Help for the american girl: I want to earn a Master degree in the UK Watch

alohachica
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
Hi Folks,

I am considering a Master's degree in the UK I studied business in Chicago and now I am looking to options that I have in the UK

I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?
Also can you give information about financial aid?

Please reach me out if you need help/information to apply to school in the USA
Thank you !
0
reply
Limoncello
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by alohachica)
Hi Folks,

I am considering a Master's degree in the UK I studied business in Chicago and now I am looking to options that I have in the UK

I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?
Also can you give information about financial aid?

Please reach me out if you need help/information to apply to school in the USA
Thank you !
there isn't financial aid (like in the us). There are however few scholarships but you need to be extremely talented and I believe the us government also has some grants for American students wishing to study in the UK.
0
reply
Zefiros
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by alohachica)
Hi Folks,

I am considering a Master's degree in the UK I studied business in Chicago and now I am looking to options that I have in the UK

I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?
Also can you give information about financial aid?

Please reach me out if you need help/information to apply to school in the USA
Thank you !
A 4-year USA college degree is equivalent to a 3-year UK undergrad degree, so you will have to complete the whole Master's program like everybody else.
0
reply
Limoncello
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
(Original post by Zefiros)
A 4-year USA college degree is equivalent to a 3-year UK undergrad degree, so you will have to complete the whole Master's program like everybody else.
actually not always. Some universities require a uk graduate diploma before being able to do a uk master hence 3 year undergraduate uk > usa although it depends on the university.
(Original post by alohachica)
Hi Folks,

I am considering a Master's degree in the UK I studied business in Chicago and now I am looking to options that I have in the UK

I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?
Also can you give information about financial aid?

Please reach me out if you need help/information to apply to school in the USA
Thank you !
Which university and what program are you interested in? Have you taken your gmat/gre?
0
reply
Baron of Sealand
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by alohachica)
I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?
No.


(Original post by alohachica)
Also can you give information about financial aid?
They tend to be university-based. You can see if there are any general aids for Americans from America.
0
reply
MASTER265
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
Your accent is cute
0
reply
thechairman66
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
I'm an American currently getting my masters in the UK. Let me help


(Original post by alohachica)

I know that undergrad is 3 years there I studied 4 years will I study only one year if I decide to enroll to a 2 years program?


A masters program and your undergraduate have nothing to do with one another. By that I mean the length of your previous studies will have no impact whatsoever on the length of your masters program. However it's important to note that most masters program in the UK are only one year (12 months) anyways. So for example I started school in Sept 2013 and I'll officially be done in Sept 2014. The classroom instruction period typically ends in April or May and you spend the summer writing your dissertation.

However, make sure you check the length of each program you're interested in because length might vary depending on the program or the school


Also can you give information about financial aid?
What are you asking about specifically?

As a previous poster above mentioned, the US and the UK have different philosophies towards financial aid. In the US almost everyone gets *something* even if it's just a $5,000 scholarship for a $20,000 program. That's not how it works here. I wouldn't say that most don't receive financial aid, but I'd say it's probably a 50/50 proposition. It's very important to apply for financial aid early especially as an international student. A lot of schools will accept applications until July for a program that starts in Sept, but their financial aid deadline is usually at the end of April.

Apply right now if you're even thinking about it. Trust me, the application system in the UK is 100% easier, simpler, and faster than in the states. For example, in the US most schools require you to have official copies of all your documents before you can apply. And a lot of them still require you to mail them in. In most places in the UK you can simply tell them what your GPA is and they'll give you a conditional offer. Which basically means you're accepted as long as you meet the conditions (ie scan and send an official copy of your transcript). Also important to note, most schools do not have have application fees. So aside from time and effort, you have very little to lose by applying.


Let me know if you have any more questions

Cheers
1
reply
Zefiros
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by Limoncello)
actually not always. Some universities require a uk graduate diploma before being able to do a uk master hence 3 year undergraduate uk > usa although it depends on the university.
That's true. I suppose that the quality of education in the US varies a lot more than in the UK, so it might depend on one's alma mater too.
0
reply
Limoncello
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Zefiros)
That's true. I suppose that the quality of education in the US varies a lot more than in the UK, so it might depend on one's alma mater too.
Not just the actual quality but rather the specialisation.

In the US most universities have requirements ( or core curriculum) so a student is forced to take courses outside of his chosen field, so you don't need to chose your major until the 2nd or even 3rd. This means that at the end even though it's a 4 years degree it is often not as specialised in the chosen field as it is in the UK, since whatever degree you take all your courses will be directly related to it, however in the US you can major in for eg Pre-med and take photography and music courses .
0
reply
thechairman66
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by Limoncello)
Not just the actual quality but rather the specialisation.

In the US most universities have requirements ( or core curriculum) so a student is forced to take courses outside of his chosen field, so you don't need to chose your major until the 2nd or even 3rd. This means that at the end even though it's a 4 years degree it is often not as specialised in the chosen field as it is in the UK, since whatever degree you take all your courses will be directly related to it, however in the US you can major in for eg Pre-med and take photography and music courses .
This is a bit of a misrepresentation. In the US, universities are focused on the well rounded development of students. Because of this all students are required to take prerequisites outside of their major. This serves two purposes. First it allows students to sample a wide variety of disciplines in case they are undecided about what they wish to study or in case they want to change their mind. For example a student might go to college with the intent of being a business major, but then he takes his first ever psychology class and falls in love with psychology instead. Or conversely perhaps he/she take a business class and decide they don't really like it, then they're given the freedom to explore other options.

Additionally, being a well rounded student means pushing your comfort zone and trying new things. I share one of my electives with 3rd year students getting ready to graduate. When I made a comment on how something in our book was similar to Aristotle everyone went completely blank faced. Turns out most of them never even took a philosophy class and were completely unaware of something most Americans learn fall semester of freshmen year.

Each system has it's strengths and weaknesses, but the lack of required courses outside one's field is not one of the strengths of the UK system.
1
reply
Limoncello
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by thechairman66)
This is a bit of a misrepresentation. In the US, universities are focused on the well rounded development of students. Because of this all students are required to take prerequisites outside of their major. This serves two purposes. First it allows students to sample a wide variety of disciplines in case they are undecided about what they wish to study or in case they want to change their mind. For example a student might go to college with the intent of being a business major, but then he takes his first ever psychology class and falls in love with psychology instead. Or conversely perhaps he/she take a business class and decide they don't really like it, then they're given the freedom to explore other options.

Additionally, being a well rounded student means pushing your comfort zone and trying new things. I share one of my electives with 3rd year students getting ready to graduate. When I made a comment on how something in our book was similar to Aristotle everyone went completely blank faced. Turns out most of them never even took a philosophy class and were completely unaware of something most Americans learn fall semester of freshmen year.

Each system has it's strengths and weaknesses, but the lack of required courses outside one's field is not one of the strengths of the UK system.
Yes I am fully aware of that. US education is more well rounded while European is more specialised
0
reply
sj27
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#12
Report 5 years ago
#12
(Original post by thechairman66)
This is a bit of a misrepresentation. In the US, universities are focused on the well rounded development of students. Because of this all students are required to take prerequisites outside of their major. This serves two purposes. First it allows students to sample a wide variety of disciplines in case they are undecided about what they wish to study or in case they want to change their mind. For example a student might go to college with the intent of being a business major, but then he takes his first ever psychology class and falls in love with psychology instead. Or conversely perhaps he/she take a business class and decide they don't really like it, then they're given the freedom to explore other options.

Additionally, being a well rounded student means pushing your comfort zone and trying new things. I share one of my electives with 3rd year students getting ready to graduate. When I made a comment on how something in our book was similar to Aristotle everyone went completely blank faced. Turns out most of them never even took a philosophy class and were completely unaware of something most Americans learn fall semester of freshmen year.

Each system has it's strengths and weaknesses, but the lack of required courses outside one's field is not one of the strengths of the UK system.
Excellent post.

My sister will graduate from a top 20 US uni this year. She went to do pre-med, and has completed all the requirements for that. However she has also done enough other stuff, including languages and social sciences, that she is now deciding between her original intention of applying to medical school or applying for a masters in international affairs! I think it's really cool that a system can give you those kind of widely divergent choices when you emerge with your bachelors!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

What's your favourite genre?

Rock (203)
23.52%
Pop (214)
24.8%
Jazz (33)
3.82%
Classical (48)
5.56%
Hip-Hop (166)
19.24%
Electronic (60)
6.95%
Indie (139)
16.11%

Watched Threads

View All