The British and the Japanese

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young_guns
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#1
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#1
There are some fascinating parrellels between the British and the Japanese


(1) Both are an island race* living on a large island/isle offshore a large continent

(2) Both were major seafaring powers who built up a large empire protected by a powerful navy (the British obviously of a different scope, but nonetheless)

(3) Both adopted industrialisation at the earliest possible opportunity

(4) Both are considered to have a somewhat "quirky" sense of humour

(5) Both consider or considered themselves highly superior to their continental cousins

(6) Both enjoy an obsession with tea and gardening


*I don't mean island race to imply any ethnic consideration, it's more in the Churchillian/Thatcherian sense
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HucktheForde
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#2
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#2
The one huge difference that completely separates both is one are humane and civilized and another are complete spawn of devils that takes life without batting an eyelid.
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FlareBlitz96
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#3
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#3
Japan has anime.

Japan 1-0
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RayApparently
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#4
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#4
(Original post by HucktheForde)
The one huge difference that completely separates both is one are humane and civilized and another are complete spawn of devils that takes life without batting an eyelid.
Not even sure which you're talking about.
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Drewski
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#5
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#5
(Original post by HucktheForde)
The one huge difference that completely separates both is one are humane and civilized and another are complete spawn of devils that takes life without batting an eyelid.
And yet, anyone with half a brain cell knows perfectly well that both countries have done things which fit into both categories...


I've lived and worked in Japan, yes there are some similarities, but they're only in very basic general senses.
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HucktheForde
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Drewski)
And yet, anyone with half a brain cell knows perfectly well that both countries have done things which fit into both categories...


I've lived and worked in Japan, yes there are some similarities, but they're only in very basic general senses.
no chance mate.

What we have done cannot in a million years be compared with them. They just gave brutality a whole new definition.
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RayApparently
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#7
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#7
(Original post by HucktheForde)
no chance mate.

What we have done cannot in a million years be compared with them. They just gave brutality a whole new definition.
Say what you mean. You think the Japanese aren't 'civilised' and/or are 'spawn of devils'?
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HucktheForde
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#8
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#8
(Original post by RayApparently)
Say what you mean. You think the Japanese aren't 'civilised' and/or are 'spawn of devils'?
the last time i posted a few pictures about it i got banned for posting gore pics. so feel free to google it yourself.
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Chlorophile
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#9
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#9
(Original post by young_guns)
There are some fascinating parrellels between the British and the Japanese


(1) Both are an island race* living on a large island/isle offshore a large continent

(2) Both were major seafaring powers who built up a large empire protected by a powerful navy (the British obviously of a different scope, but nonetheless)

(3) Both adopted industrialisation at the earliest possible opportunity

(4) Both are considered to have a somewhat "quirky" sense of humour

(5) Both consider or considered themselves highly superior to their continental cousins

(6) Both enjoy an obsession with tea and gardening


*I don't mean island race to imply any ethnic consideration, it's more in the Churchillian/Thatcherian sense
Those are some pretty vague parallels, you could make similar vague comparisons with other countires. I think Japanese culture and British culture are generally incredibly different.
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Jebedee
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#10
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#10
Having lived in both I can honestly say Japan wins on all fronts. If I never go back to UK I'll be completely happy.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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RayApparently
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#11
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#11
(Original post by HucktheForde)
the last time i posted a few pictures about it i got banned for posting gore pics. so feel free to google it yourself.
Again, say what you mean. Feel free to say similar about every country that's committed crimes against humanity (there are many). I want to know clearly if you're criticising historical crime or modern, wholly civilised, peoples.
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RayApparently
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#12
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#12
There are certain cultural similarities - a understated and embedded conservatism for example. Indeed one is in Europe and the other in Asia, they're not exactly twins. But I see what the OP is getting at. My two favourite countries.
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young_guns
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#13
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#13
(Original post by RayApparently)
There are certain cultural similarities - a understated and embedded conservatism for example. Indeed one is in Europe and the other in Asia, they're not exactly twins. But I see what the OP is getting at. My two favourite countries.
I'm not commenting on parrallels in the superficial "In Japan, they bow and we don't", or as you say, one is in Asia and the other is in Europe, sense.

I'm more pointing to sociological, geographic and geopolitical factors that have influenced their history and culture in very interesting ways. In particular, I think the fact they are both island races is hugely important in considering why they both evolved in ways that mimiced each other on many levels.

To be honest, I did expect (not saying you did this) some TSRians to respond along the lines of, "What are you talking about? They're nothing like us, we have an alphabet and they use characters" or something similar to demonstrate they completely missed the point and are looking at this only on the most facile level

The comparison of Japan and Britain is not new, it's been made since the 19th century and they used to be called "the Britain of the East". It's particularly their similar island status (Britain and Japan are really the only two major island civilisations in the world, there are no others) and subsequent development as seafaring/naval powers, and their similar full-fledged and enthusiastic adoption of industrialisation in a way that allowed them to outmatch their vastly more populous continental neighbours.

And having drawn attention to that particular and notable parrallel, it's then just the cherry on top to point out they both have what is seen elsewhere as a quirky sense of humour, they are both perceived to be quite formal and attached to manners and courtesy, they both love tea and gardening, and so on.

As I said, I'm not saying they are identical cultures or even similar in the ordinary sense; they are alien to one another in manyways. It's a comment on their social and geopolitical development, and how they interacted with and were perceived by the world, that isbeing commented upon
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young_guns
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#14
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#14
(Original post by Drewski)
I've lived and worked in Japan, yes there are some similarities, but they're only in very basic general senses.
I'd say the opposite. It's in the facile sense that they are very different ("Oh, one's in Asia and the other's in Europe" or "We have an alphabet and they use characters".)

I'm talking about their geographic and geopolitical development, the fact that Britain and Japan really are the only two major island civilisations, that they both developed into major seafaring powers and both enthusiastically adopted the industrial revolution in a way that allowed them to be a peer of their considerably more populous continental cousins. It's also inthe way they're perceived by other peoples.

It's just a cherry on top of the aforementioned things that both countries enjoy tea and gardening, and that they are perceived as polite and honourable (or at least concerned with honour), having a notable interest in protocol, and being calculating and also quirky

Someone might say, "They're nothing like us, they bow and we don't". And I'd pat themand say well done, that's an exceptionally superficial analysis. I'm not talking about the day-to-day experience, but the countrys' place inthe world, their societal development and the like.

By the way,this isn't a novel thing to point out; prior to World War 2 they were often called "the Britain of the East".
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RayApparently
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#15
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#15
(Original post by young_guns)
I'm not commenting on parrallels in the superficial "In Japan, they bow and we don't", or as you say, one is in Asia and the other is in Europe, sense.

I'm more pointing to sociological, geographic and geopolitical factors that have influenced their history and culture in very interesting ways. In particular, I think the fact they are both island races is hugely important in considering why they both evolved in ways that mimiced each other on many levels.

To be honest, I did expect (not saying you did this) some TSRians to respond along the lines of, "What are you talking about? They're nothing like us, we have an alphabet and they use characters" or something similar to demonstrate they completely missed the point and are looking at this only on the most facile level

The comparison of Japan and Britain is not new, it's been made since the 19th century and they used to be called "the Britain of the East". It's particularly their similar island status (Britain and Japan are really the only two major island civilisations in the world, there are no others) and subsequent development as seafaring/naval powers, and their similar full-fledged and enthusiastic adoption of industrialisation in a way that allowed them to outmatch their vastly more populous continental neighbours.

And having drawn attention to that particular and notable parrallel, it's then just the cherry on top to point out they both have what is seen elsewhere as a quirky sense of humour, they are both perceived to be quite formal and attached to manners and courtesy, they both love tea and gardening, and so on.

As I said, I'm not saying they are identical cultures or even similar in the ordinary sense; they are alien to one another in manyways. It's a comment on their social and geopolitical development, and how they interacted with and were perceived by the world, that isbeing commented upon
I agree with you, I was only adding cultural similarities to the list. As for the 'they are in Asia etc.' I meant that only as an explanation for what you call the superficial differences.
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GoldenEmblem277
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#16
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#16
Also- the Code of Chivalry vs the Code of Bushido- another interesting parallel.

Maybe this explains why I'm such a huge Japanophile.
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Studentus-anonymous
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#17
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#17
I think what we've learned here is that large Island nations off of continents have a relatively stable and insular foundation to develop a more unified and more peaceful culture so it can expend it's energies elsewhere into empires, trade and the odd war abroad, and technological advancement, and socio-cultural reforms and progress at home.


Continental societies and cultures usually share land borders and it's much easier to disrupt each other via conflict and competition.

Saying that China was technologically more advanced than Japan for most of it;s history, and Europe was hardly ever that far behind Britain. For a lot of history the British isles were a backwater.
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Kangie
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#18
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#18
(Original post by HucktheForde)
no chance mate.

What we have done cannot in a million years be compared with them. They just gave brutality a whole new definition.
Care to elaborate on this, without posting pictures? I find Japan a much better place than Britain as everytime I've visited, the atmosphere is a lot more friendly, relaxed and the culture hasn't been destroyed by immigrants.
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MatureStudent36
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Kangie)
Care to elaborate on this, without posting pictures? I find Japan a much better place than Britain as everytime I've visited, the atmosphere is a lot more friendly, relaxed and the culture hasn't been destroyed by immigrants.
I find that when ever I visit somewhere. But don't mix up the relaxed feel of a holiday or a visits with a real comparison.
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