How do I revise for English Literature A-level? Watch

JusticeInk
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I'm currently doing English literature at A-level and I'm constantly getting C's in my mocks, I've never got anything higher than a B. I really need help and advice on how to revise for English Literature to make my grades better, because I need an A for uni. I'm doing English literature with OCR and I'm studying 'The Duches Of Malfi', Rossetti poems, 'The Bloody Chamber' (The gothic) and 'Twelfth Night' by Shakespeare. Also for GCSE we had an open book exam so this why I'm not used to the closed book exam format.
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mkhurana
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here's how i revise for english literature which got me an A for as;
i'm doing the OCR exams too, and what i do is structure my essays in a way that includes ALL the AO's. for example, if AO3 is 30%, equivalent to 9 marks, whilst i'm writing my essay i would include exactly 9 points on context to ensure i've got every mark. same with the others, if it's 20% AO1 (5 marks) i would make sure i'd mention quotes/themes/etc 5 times, so this could be once in the introduction, twice in my first paragraph, etc etc. since this is how the examiners mark your exam, they will know exactly where to give your marks. DONT waffle, only talk about what links to the AO's.
for actual revision i make mind maps on theme quotes and character quotes, HOWEVER don't just write the quote, here's how i set up mine:
AO1- the quote and a theme
AO2- a language technique that the quote shows e.g rhetorical question
AO3- context for the quote
AO4/AO5- interpretations/comparisons.
so for each quote, i have ALL the AO's in place so when i write the essay i can mention everything and gain a mark for every AO. this is how you should analyse a quote/make it into a paragraph.
i remember quotes by writing them over and over again on scrap paper and testing myself, which is a bit tedious but it helps. also, as soon as i get my exam paper i jot down as many quotes i can remember in the moment. i think the main thing you can do to achieve an A is just remember the mark scheme and getting as many AO's as you can in your essay.
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JusticeInk
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Thank you so so much, I'm going to use your technique in the future, and hopefully it'll help!! Thanks again!!
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mozaregita
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(Original post by mkhurana)
here's how i revise for english literature which got me an A for as;
i'm doing the OCR exams too, and what i do is structure my essays in a way that includes ALL the AO's. for example, if AO3 is 30%, equivalent to 9 marks, whilst i'm writing my essay i would include exactly 9 points on context to ensure i've got every mark. same with the others, if it's 20% AO1 (5 marks) i would make sure i'd mention quotes/themes/etc 5 times, so this could be once in the introduction, twice in my first paragraph, etc etc. since this is how the examiners mark your exam, they will know exactly where to give your marks. DONT waffle, only talk about what links to the AO's.
for actual revision i make mind maps on theme quotes and character quotes, HOWEVER don't just write the quote, here's how i set up mine:
AO1- the quote and a theme
AO2- a language technique that the quote shows e.g rhetorical question
AO3- context for the quote
AO4/AO5- interpretations/comparisons.
so for each quote, i have ALL the AO's in place so when i write the essay i can mention everything and gain a mark for every AO. this is how you should analyse a quote/make it into a paragraph.
i remember quotes by writing them over and over again on scrap paper and testing myself, which is a bit tedious but it helps. also, as soon as i get my exam paper i jot down as many quotes i can remember in the moment. i think the main thing you can do to achieve an A is just remember the mark scheme and getting as many AO's as you can in your essay.
hi there, your technique seems very helpful!! was just wondering if you could help me figure out how many marks are 7.5% and 5%??
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Ella2001
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(Original post by mkhurana)
here's how i revise for english literature which got me an A for as;
i'm doing the OCR exams too, and what i do is structure my essays in a way that includes ALL the AO's. for example, if AO3 is 30%, equivalent to 9 marks, whilst i'm writing my essay i would include exactly 9 points on context to ensure i've got every mark. same with the others, if it's 20% AO1 (5 marks) i would make sure i'd mention quotes/themes/etc 5 times, so this could be once in the introduction, twice in my first paragraph, etc etc. since this is how the examiners mark your exam, they will know exactly where to give your marks. DONT waffle, only talk about what links to the AO's.
for actual revision i make mind maps on theme quotes and character quotes, HOWEVER don't just write the quote, here's how i set up mine:
AO1- the quote and a theme
AO2- a language technique that the quote shows e.g rhetorical question
AO3- context for the quote
AO4/AO5- interpretations/comparisons.
so for each quote, i have ALL the AO's in place so when i write the essay i can mention everything and gain a mark for every AO. this is how you should analyse a quote/make it into a paragraph.
i remember quotes by writing them over and over again on scrap paper and testing myself, which is a bit tedious but it helps. also, as soon as i get my exam paper i jot down as many quotes i can remember in the moment. i think the main thing you can do to achieve an A is just remember the mark scheme and getting as many AO's as you can in your essay.
Heyyy, your revision technique looks quite beneficial and I will definitely be trying it. Would you mind sharing your revision materials with me as I am struggling quite a bit and I'm struggling to get any responses. Thank you x
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mkhurana
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(Original post by Ella2001)
Heyyy, your revision technique looks quite beneficial and I will definitely be trying it. Would you mind sharing your revision materials with me as I am struggling quite a bit and I'm struggling to get any responses. Thank you x
Hi there I have finished A levels therefore I no longer own any revision materials. Definitely try what I mentioned in the post by picking a quote and listing all the assessment objectives for it. What I did for my A2 exam is writing a pre-planned essay which was broad and general e.g for The Great Gatsby the main theme is the American Dream so I wrote an essay based around this idea and I could link it to any question that came up in the exam (Loss, hope, failure, death, pursuit of money) it pretty much linked to everything so memorising my points and taking them into the exam and moulding them into whichever question came up helps a ton. Good luck and if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask x
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Ella2001
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(Original post by mkhurana)
Hi there I have finished A levels therefore I no longer own any revision materials. Definitely try what I mentioned in the post by picking a quote and listing all the assessment objectives for it. What I did for my A2 exam is writing a pre-planned essay which was broad and general e.g for The Great Gatsby the main theme is the American Dream so I wrote an essay based around this idea and I could link it to any question that came up in the exam (Loss, hope, failure, death, pursuit of money) it pretty much linked to everything so memorising my points and taking them into the exam and moulding them into whichever question came up helps a ton. Good luck and if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask x
Oh ok that's a really good technique but I'm not sure of what a general question would be for my texts. I do Othello, The kite runner, The handmaid's tale and Blake (songs of innocence and experience) and keats. Do you have any knowledge of them?
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ABM2001
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Hi all,

Personally I’ve found using a whiteboard and making mindmaps on it incredibly helpful. Also, having group discussions, bouncing ideas off of eachother is also a great technique. Even if you’re not the most talkative or social it’s always helpful to sit and listen and even take notes.

For English Literature A-Level, I’m currently studying:
- The Handmaids Tale, by Margaret Atwood
- Nineteen Eighty Four, by George Orwell
- Christina Rossetti Selected Poems
- A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen
- Hamlet, Shakespeare (course work)
- Half Of A Yellow Sun, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (coursework)
- Carol Ann Duffy’s World’s Wife (coursework)

I was wondering if you’re doing Carol Ann Duffy World’s Wife for coursework - what poem are you thinking of focusing on?

All the best.
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ABM2001
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Sorry - Hamlet isn’t for coursework.
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