Ybsy75
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Do you take notes during interview? Do you send thank you emails after?
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luq_ali
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Taking notes during an interview as well as asking a few questions to show you know somethings about the organization and are interested enough in it to have done a little research are VERY effective interview tools, but NOT to the point of being a distraction. You don't want to be taking notes to the point of not keeping eye contact with and appearing attentive and interested with the interviewer. And you don't want to ask, for example, in a first interview with someone from Human Resources for an accounting job, a question about LIFO/FIFO inventory. Such a question in the initial rounds of interview, most likely, just using this as an example, will go way above the head of the interviewer. Now, on a 2nd or 3rd interview, where you are actually interviewing with the people who you'd be working for, getting that much more specific, both in your notes, and questions, would be very effective.

So make sure you know "who" your audience is and keep in engaged and personable with the person you are interviewing with. With regard to e-mails, sure those are fine, to send. BUT, go a little old school classical-send an actual thank you card in the mail-less likely to be lost in the jumble and shuffle, and will definitely stand out-those were once standard, I'm told, but not very common now.

(Original post by Ybsy75)
Do you take notes during interview? Do you send thank you emails after?
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Ybsy75
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(Original post by luq_ali)
Taking notes during an interview as well as asking a few questions to show you know somethings about the organization and are interested enough in it to have done a little research are VERY effective interview tools, but NOT to the point of being a distraction. You don't want to be taking notes to the point of not keeping eye contact with and appearing attentive and interested with the interviewer. And you don't want to ask, for example, in a first interview with someone from Human Resources for an accounting job, a question about LIFO/FIFO inventory. Such a question in the initial rounds of interview, most likely, just using this as an example, will go way above the head of the interviewer. Now, on a 2nd or 3rd interview, where you are actually interviewing with the people who you'd be working for, getting that much more specific, both in your notes, and questions, would be very effective.

So make sure you know "who" your audience is and keep in engaged and personable with the person you are interviewing with.
Yes, that's why I worry notes would backfire. I wouldn't trust myself to keep my attention fully on the interviewer and take notes. I'm bad at that.
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luq_ali
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Then use it as a prop, and have a few things you've already written out that you can appear to glance down at a few times, pen in hand, to sort of check off. If you fear you can't use it for more than that-it can still be effective as a prop. I'm going to amend my previous answer to address your question about e-mails, too.

(Original post by Ybsy75)
Yes, that's why I worry notes would backfire. I wouldn't trust myself to keep my attention fully on the interviewer and take notes. I'm bad at that.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Ybsy75)
Do you take notes during interview? Do you send thank you emails after?
Notes - no. Have a pen and paper and jot down the odd word to keep track of a question - yes. So if you get a question that has multiple parts eg 'Can you tell us about a time when you met a challenge at work? What was your first response, how did you resolve it and what was the result? Then I might jot down challenge, first resp, resolve, result.

Send an email afterwards - no, not unless I know that I've not been part of a formal recruitment round, and an individual has put time aside to give me a speculative interview. Just emailing after a standard process interview is just clutter, no-one is interviewing you based on your manners and it can't be taken into account because it's a panel process.
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Ybsy75
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Notes - no. Have a pen and paper and jot down the odd word to keep track of a question - yes. So if you get a question that has multiple parts eg 'Can you tell us about a time when you met a challenge at work? What was your first response, how did you resolve it and what was the result? Then I might jot down challenge, first resp, resolve, result.

Send an email afterwards - no, not unless I know that I've not been part of a formal recruitment round, and an individual has put time aside to give me a speculative interview. Just emailing after a standard process interview is just clutter, no-one is interviewing you based on your manners and it can't be taken into account because it's a panel process.
There's too much conflicting advice online. Some say never turn up to an interview empty handed or with a rucksack but ive done both to every successful interview I've had to date.

What if it's not a panel and it's the hiring manager plus one of his colleagues.
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(Original post by Ybsy75)
There's too much conflicting advice online. Some say never turn up to an interview empty handed or with a rucksack but ive done both to every successful interview I've had to date.
Because no-one cares! It's only that if you are nervous, and in someone else's office, clunking around with a large bag can be (but isn't always) a distraction/annoyance/trip hazard.

(Original post by Ybsy75)
What if it's not a panel and it's the hiring manager plus one of his colleagues.
That's a panel! Look very suspiciously at any employer who has only one person interviewing you. Best practice is 3, 2 should be a minimum.
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Ganjaweed Rebel
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No and no. I speak slowly and stare into their eyes even if it seems awkward.
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Ybsy75
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Because no-one cares! It's only that if you are nervous, and in someone else's office, clunking around with a large bag can be (but isn't always) a distraction/annoyance/trip hazard.

That's a panel! Look very suspiciously at any employer who has only one person interviewing you. Best practice is 3, 2 should be a minimum.
True. And I get the feeling that a lot of the advice out there is tailored towards sales jobs or similar where appearance and performance is everything. The hiring manager has the ultimate say though since at the end of the day, they will be your line manager.

Do you work in the private or public sector?
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luq_ali
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There is certainly a lot of advice out there on interviewing, and I'm not here to say one person is wrong or right, as opposed to another viewpoint. I can only say you have to find what works for you, somewhere in the middle. I do know, coming through business school where I majored in accounting, I had, for four years, a professional development course, which included mastering interviewing. My father also was a nationally recognized recruiter for the U.S. military, prior to his retirement and going into private practice in psychology, so he shared a lot of his insights with me which I found to be very helpful. And ultimately, of my first four interviews with Fortune 500 companies, I got three plant visits(flown up to the corporate headquarters) and 2 job offers. I had other interviews after that, where they might have had several hundred applicants and I managed to get down to the final 2 or 3, sometimes getting the offer, sometimes not. (I do think the interview process is very different, though, say, in sales, marketing, accounting, finance, and general business, as opposed, to say, some of the legal job interviews that I did during law school and after. So a big part of it is the industry you are applying for-as an example, the legal interviews were way more intense, in my opinion-but then, I'm sure interviews for engineers and physicians are much different in their intensity than say, an interview with an Insurance company to be a claim representative.)

Also, it is considered good etiquette, when you meet someone, to send them a message, again-the card-a simple thank you card, is enough(I'm not saying an e-mail won't work, but it again is going to be in that clutter.) People will tell you otherwise, and again, I'm not at all attacking their views, I can only say both from my own experiences, and from those of colleagues and friends, I absolutely do know that it has been VERY helpful. Best wishes to you for much success.

(Original post by Ybsy75)
True. And I get the feeling that a lot of the advice out there is tailored towards sales jobs or similar where appearance and performance is everything. The hiring manager has the ultimate say though since at the end of the day, they will be your line manager.

Do you work in the private or public sector?
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Ybsy75
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(Original post by luq_ali)
There is certainly a lot of advice out there on interviewing, and I'm not here to say one person is wrong or right, as opposed to another viewpoint. I can only say you have to find what works for you, somewhere in the middle. I do know, coming through business school where I majored in accounting, I had, for four years, a professional development course, which included mastering interviewing. My father also was a nationally recognized recruiter for the U.S. military, prior to his retirement and going into private practice in psychology, so he shared a lot of his insights with me which I found to be very helpful. And ultimately, of my first four interviews with Fortune 500 companies, I got three plant visits(flown up to the corporate headquarters) and 2 job offers. I had other interviews after that, where they might have had several hundred applicants and I managed to get down to the final 2 or 3, sometimes getting the offer, sometimes not. (I do think the interview process is very different, though, say, in sales, marketing, accounting, finance, and general business, as opposed, to say, some of the legal job interviews that I did during law school and after. So a big part of it is the industry you are applying for-as an example, the legal interviews were way more intense, in my opinion-but then, I'm sure interviews for engineers and physicians are much different in their intensity than say, an interview with an Insurance company to be a claim representative.)

Also, it is considered good etiquette, when you meet someone, to send them a message, again-the card-a simple thank you card, is enough(I'm not saying an e-mail won't work, but it again is going to be in that clutter.) People will tell you otherwise, and again, I'm not at all attacking their views, I can only say both from my own experiences, and from those of colleagues and friends, I absolutely do know that it has been VERY helpful. Best wishes to you for much success.
Thanks. I'm also wondering whether it's a good idea to ask a question at the end like "based on what we've discussed about my skills and experiences, how well do I fit the profile of the candidate you are looking for?" Or "is there anything I can show you to improve my application?"
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luq_ali
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No, I wouldn't suggest those things. You know-its kind of like this, they want you to appear interested, but not desperate. They want to think that they are hiring someone who also had offers and opportunities elsewhere.

(Original post by Ybsy75)
Thanks. I'm also wondering whether it's a good idea to ask a question at the end like "based on what we've discussed about my skills and experiences, how well do I fit the profile of the candidate you are looking for?" Or "is there anything I can show you to improve my application?"
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Ybsy75
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(Original post by luq_ali)
No, I wouldn't suggest those things. You know-its kind of like this, they want you to appear interested, but not desperate. They want to think that they are hiring someone who also had offers and opportunities elsewhere.
I don't think that's necessarily true. I think it depends on whether you're just desperate for any job or if you're actually genuinely interested in the role you applied for and it's an ambition you've had for a while.
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Ybsy75
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Also if you know someone who works in the team, should you mention theor name to the interviewer?

And how long should answers be? Especially for answers to questions such as why this job? Why this company etc?

And is it a good idea to ask questions at the end such as given the current changes in the industry, what do you think will be some of the opportunities and challenges for the team? Or will that put the manager in an awkward position?
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