Could somebody translate this from Spanish to English please?

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sajmo1
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#1
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#1
Niñito, no quiero que pongas la cola del gato en tu boca. Is the sentence just ridiculous or am I getting a word wrong?
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donut_mckenzie28
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I study Spanish and this may translate:

'Little boy (toddler), do not put the tail of the cat in your mouth.'
I hope that has helped.
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username3553182
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(Original post by donut_mckenzie28)
I study Spanish and this may translate:

'Little boy (toddler), do not put the tail of the cat in your mouth.'
I hope that has helped.
This is right, except a more literal translation would be:

Little boy, I don't want you to put the cat's tail in your mouth
As far as I'm aware this isn't an idiom or something - that seems to be right! (and that's probably what you got too)
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donut_mckenzie28
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(Original post by mundosinfin)
This is right, except a more literal translation would be:

Little boy, I don't want you to put the cat's tail in your mouth
As far as I'm aware this isn't an idiom or something - that seems to be right! (and that's probably what you got too)
Probably much better.You can tell i need a better translation for spanish
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DrSocSciences
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It's a bit stilted. Think about the meaning rather than the word for word translation.
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username3553182
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(Original post by donut_mckenzie28)
Probably much better.You can tell i need a better translation for spanish
Honestly your translation was great and got the gist of the sentence with all the required words, I was just nitpicking Your translation skills seem good as they are now!
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username3553182
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
It's a bit stilted. Think about the meaning rather than the word for word translation.
I think OP can probably get the message although the translations seem generally rather unnatural in English. (it doesn't look like this sentence actually has to be translated, more OP didn't understand it in a book or something)
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Plantagenet Crown
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#8
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(Original post by sajmo1)
Niñito, no quiero que pongas la cola del gato en tu boca. Is the sentence just ridiculous or am I getting a word wrong?
People have already provided the English translation, but the sentence itself in Spanish is phrased a bit clumsily, almost as if someone translated it literally from English. A more natural way of saying the same thing is thus:

"Niñito, no quiero que te metas la cola del gato en la boca". In Spanish, body parts do not go accompanied by possessive pronouns in the vast majority of contexts (unless you're saying something like "my eyes" or "your leg" etc.).

E.g. In English you'd say "my leg hurts". Whereas in Spanish you'd say "me duele la pierna", literally "The leg (of mine) hurts".
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DrSocSciences
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(Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
People have already provided the English translation, but the sentence itself in Spanish is phrased a bit clumsily, almost as if someone translated it literally from English. A more natural way of saying the same thing is thus:

"Niñito, no quiero que te metas la cola del gato en la boca". In Spanish, body parts do not go accompanied by possessive pronouns in the vast majority of contexts (unless you're saying something like "my eyes" or "your leg" etc.).

E.g. In English you'd say "my leg hurts". Whereas in Spanish you'd say "me duele la pierna", literally "The leg (of mine) hurts".
Yes, true. But I'd be more inclined to defer to the colloquial spirit of the intent rather than the verbatim translation, so I'd probably use 'dejar de' or 'sacar' in the imperative (reflexive) form.ie. 'Stop chewing the cat's tail' or 'Get that cat's tail out of your mouth.'
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Plantagenet Crown
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#10
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(Original post by DrSocSciences)
Yes, true. But I'd be more inclined to defer to the colloquial spirit of the intent rather than the verbatim translation, so I'd probably use 'dejar de' or 'sacar' in the imperative (reflexive) form.ie. 'Stop chewing the cat's tail' or 'Get that cat's tail out of your mouth.'
The use of the imperative would only be more appropriate if the boy was sucking the cat's tail right in the moment and the other person asked him to stop doing it.

However, from the OP's sentence, the context seems to be more a comment that a parent is making in advance, i.e. "I don't want you to put the cat's tail in your mouth" as opposed to "stop putting the tail in your mouth/get it out of your mouth this instant!". Maybe the OP could clarify the exact context of the sentence?
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DrSocSciences
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
The use of the imperative would only be more appropriate if the boy was sucking the cat's tail right in the moment and the other person asked him to stop doing it.

However, from the OP's sentence, the context seems to be more a comment that a parent is making in advance, i.e. "I don't want you to put the cat's tail in your mouth" as opposed to "stop putting the tail in your mouth/get it out of your mouth this instant!". Maybe the OP could clarify the exact context of the sentence?
Agreed: it's a pre-emptive expression of preference. As a mum, 'tho, I'd probably say "get that filthy [whatever object] away from/out of your mouth" before Child had actually chomped it. So my suggestion higher up the thread is a linguistic-experiential hybrid.
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