FrenchToastBF
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I’m really struggling to grasp the concept of propositional knowledge. The whole S and P subject and proposition thing is confusing the heck out of me.
I’ve really tried to get my head around it but I just can’t seem to and it’s making me frustrated with myself.

If anyone has a second to spare please could you explain it to me in the most blunt, obvious and dumbed down way possible please, as if you’re explaining it to a 4 year old.

Thanks in advance for your help
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Quirky Object
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(Original post by FrenchToastBF)
I’m really struggling to grasp the concept of propositional knowledge. The whole S and P subject and proposition thing is confusing the heck out of me.
I’ve really tried to get my head around it but I just can’t seem to and it’s making me frustrated with myself.

If anyone has a second to spare please could you explain it to me in the most blunt, obvious and dumbed down way possible please, as if you’re explaining it to a 4 year old.

Thanks in advance for your help
Basically you have three types of knowledge: ability (knowing how to do something), acquaintance (knowing something/someone by coming into contact with them) and propositional. I think the best way to distinguish them is to think about how sentences describing each form of knowledge would be expressed, e.g.

"I know how to drive." - ability
"I know that person." - acquaintance
"I know that the sky is blue." - propositional

"The sky is blue" is a claim about reality which could be either true or false, i.e. a proposition, whereas "that person" and "how to drive" are not claims of any sort. Generally, you'll be able to tell that a certain statement is an example of propositional knowledge because it will be in the form "I know that x is y" (or x has y, does y etc.).

According to some philosophers, in order for a proposition to count as propositional knowledge, it must be a justified true belief. We know that the statement "I know that the sky is blue" is propositional knowledge because it is true that the sky is blue, the person making that statement believes that the sky is blue and we can justify this statement by saying we can see the blue sky (or talking about Rayleigh scattering, whatever). A proposition must fulfil all of these conditions - being justified, being true and being believed by someone - in order to be considered propositional knowledge.

Most people don't agree with this criterion of a justified true belief anymore due to complications with the word "justified" (see the Gettier problem), but that's basically what propositional knowledge is.
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JaneJ15
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You have good question, I will note answer too
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JaneJ15
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You have good question! I need explanation too. Sometimes I think we have to much information and our brain block it.
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