Shamima Begum would face a short drop and a sudden stop in Bangladesh Watch

Napp
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I might have punched up the title a little.. but you've got to love some of the official quotes in this article such as; 'She's not our problem' :lol:
Although more to the point though this should be giving a rather fun legal headache to Number 10 as if we ignore the legal dubiousness of making someone stateless, if memory serves is there not a piece of legislation quite explicitly forbidding Britain from sending it's citizens to be executed?
Although not being a lawyer I might be slightly wrong on that one so feel free to correct me if so.

As a slightly flippant point though; possession is 9/10th of the law and currently the Kurds have her. I imagine they'd find it more than slightly tricky to send her to either Britain or Bangladesh and one can only assume if she is left there she will eventually meet a rather certain fate which make everyone, well all the governments at least, happy... no?

IS bride Shamima Begum would "face the death penalty" for terrorism if she came to Bangladesh, the country's foreign minister has said.
Abdul Momen told the BBC that Ms Begum has "nothing to do" with his country.
The 19-year-old, who left east London to join the Islamic State group in 2015, was stripped of her British citizenship in February.
Her claim to Bangladeshi nationality through her mother is believed to have informed the Home Office's decision.
Under international law, it is illegal to deprive a person of citizenship if to do so would leave them stateless.
Speaking to the BBC, Ms Begum's lawyer, Tasnime Akunjee, told the BBC "in no way is she Bangladesh's problem".
Ms Begum is appealing against the Home Office's decision.

Mr Momen said there was "no question" of giving Ms Begum Bangladeshi citizenship or allowing her into the country, piling pressure on Home Secretary Sajid Javid to settle her status.
"She has never sought Bangladeshi citizenship and her parents are also British citizens," he told the BBC.
"The British government is responsible for her. They'll have to deal with her."
He added that, if she did end up coming to Bangladesh, she would fall foul of the country's "zero tolerance policy" towards terrorism.
"Bangladeshi law is very clear. Terrorists will have to face the death penalty," he said.
Although Ms Begum travelled to Syria to join the IS group, she has not admitted any terror offences.

The Home Office could reverse its decision "at any time" and doing so would "save British taxpayers a lot of money" in court costs and legal aid, Mr Akunjee said.
"What Sajid Javid did in stripping Shamima of her citizenship is human fly tipping - taking our problems and dumping them on other countries," he said.
The Home Office told the BBC it would not respond to Mr Momen's comments and had nothing further to add to its previous statement.

Ms Begum left the UK with two school friends at the age of 15 before being found by a journalist from the Times in a Syrian refugee camp in mid-February this year.
Heavily pregnant with her third child, she pleaded to return to the UK, claiming she had been "brainwashed" by Islamic State and now "regrets everything".
She said she did not regret travelling to Syria but did not agree with everything the IS group had done.
Mr Javid did not acquiesce to her pleas, telling MPs he "won't hesitate" to revoke her citizenship in the interests of national security.
"If you back terror, there must be consequences," he said.


Soon afterwards, she gave birth to a boy called Jarrah. He died of pneumonia in March at less than three weeks of age. She had two other children who also died.
In the wake of the boy's death, Mr Javid was criticised over the decision to strip Ms Begum of her British citizenship.
Three weeks prior to the death, Ms Begum's sister, Renu Begum, had written to Mr Javid asking him to help her bring the baby to the UK.
Under the 1981 British Nationality Act, a person can be deprived of their citizenship if the home secretary is satisfied it would be "conducive to the public good" and they would not become stateless as a result.



https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48154781
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YaliaV
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I’m sick of hearing about her.
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Napp
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(Original post by YaliaV)
I’m sick of hearing about her.
Arent we all? I'm just sick of these outlets calling her an 'ISIS bride' instead of a terrorist.
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Quick-use
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I don't really understand your title or post. What exactly is your point?
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Napp
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(Original post by Quick-use)
I don't really understand your title or post. What exactly is your point?
Title: Slightly more pithy variation on the BBC's one.
Post: Somewhat self explanatory, no?
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Andrew97
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So you’re saying she wouldn’t be safe in Bangladesh?
Surely an argument could be made that unless her name and location get changed, then she won’t be safe in the U.K
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Napp
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(Original post by Andrew97)
So you’re saying she wouldn’t be safe in Bangladesh?
Surely an argument could be made that unless her name and location get changed, then she won’t be safe in the U.K
Technically I was saying the British government have really managed to screw the pooch (legally speaking) on this one.
However, what I was saying moreover though was that a policy of masterly inactivity would work rather well for all concerned instead of the current policy of chasing 5 seconds of good(ish) media coverage
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username4499936
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(Original post by Napp)
I might have punched up the title a little.. but you've got to love some of the official quotes in this article such as; 'She's not our problem' :lol:
Although more to the point though this should be giving a rather fun legal headache to Number 10 as if we ignore the legal dubiousness of making someone stateless, if memory serves is there not a piece of legislation quite explicitly forbidding Britain from sending it's citizens to be executed?
Although not being a lawyer I might be slightly wrong on that one so feel free to correct me if so.

As a slightly flippant point though; possession is 9/10th of the law and currently the Kurds have her. I imagine they'd find it more than slightly tricky to send her to either Britain or Bangladesh and one can only assume if she is left there she will eventually meet a rather certain fate which make everyone, well all the governments at least, happy... no?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48154781
Sounds like a rather nice death.Much preferable to being dissolved in nitric acid for instance or being burned alive.Both of which Isis has done.I don't really care tbh.Good riddance to bad rubbish as they say.
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Napp
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(Original post by AJ126)
Sounds like a rather nice death.Much preferable to being dissolved in nitric acid for instance or being burned alive.Both of which Isis has done.I don't really care tbh.Good riddance to bad rubbish as they say.
Indeed, I can’t foresee many tears being shed. I do rather object to the British, Bengalis or indeed the Syrians/Kurds having to waste their money on her though.
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Good bloke
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This rather gives the lie to the attempt to deny her right to Bangladeshi citizenship. If that were true there would be no need for the Bangladeshis to play this trump card. Of course, she has not been convicted of a capital offence so cannot be executed anyway.

Begum's only chance of capitalising on it would be to confess to having been a terrrorist then she can spend twenty years in gaol in Britain.

One does have to wonder how someone who married four years ago, and has since had several children, can sensibly be called a bride.
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username4499936
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(Original post by Good bloke)
This rather gives the lie to the attempt to deny her right to Bangladeshi citizenship. If that were true there would be no need for the Bangladeshis to play this trump card. Of course, she has not been convicted of a capital offence so cannot be executed anyway.

Begum's only chance of capitalising on it would be to confess to having been a terrrorist then she can spend twenty years in gaol in Britain.

One does have to wonder how someone who married four years ago, and has since had several children, can sensibly be called a bride.
She wouldn't get 20 years here.She'd be lucky to get 5.You can literally commit murder here,get let out, kill somebodyelse and you will still only get a year in prison.This did actually happen recently.Plus it would be very difficult to prove anything.She'd just end up blowing somebody up 10 years down the line.
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the bear
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Jemima Bigbum is the authoress of her own misfortunes

smh
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Good bloke
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The other relevant point is that she is not in the UK and not currently a problem for Britain. If her withdrawn citizenship sticks (and what Bangladesh does to its convicted nationals is hardly relevant to that - the constraint on the home secerary is only whether she is entitled to citizenship elsewhere), then she will be left to her own devices to negotiate from Syria her new home in Bangladesh or somewhere else.
Last edited by Good bloke; 1 month ago
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The RAR
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Is she went to Bangladesh, counter terrorist police would surrounded her whole house and tell her to come out with her hands up, guns pointing of course, if she says no they will hail a storm of bullets on her location, pretty much killing her. So yeah, I would say she is kind of ****ed if she goes to Bangladesh (Not go back as she has never been there), but then again do I really care?
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Napp, there is a solution but it would involve Syrian Kurdistan becoming de jure independent - she gains Kurdistani citizenship by residency and the Kurds try her, meaning that the British taxpayer doesn't have to pay for her legal aid, appeals, Channel 4 interviews etc.
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pineapplepink
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she went off to isis- there's no way she should be allowed to come back
couldn't care less what happens to her as long as she never returns here
cba with all this media attention on her still
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(Original post by Napp)
Title: Slightly more pithy variation on the BBC's one.
Post: Somewhat self explanatory, no?
I wish that your post (and title) were, at the very least, somewhat self-explanatory... It just makes no sense and there's absolutely no coherent point. :confused:
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Napp
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(Original post by Quick-use)
I wish that your post (and title) were, at the very least, somewhat self-explanatory... It just makes no sense and there's absolutely no coherent point. :confused:
Umm remind me how its my problem/fault that you don't seem to be able to read?
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Napp
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(Original post by Mossbourne)
Napp, there is a solution but it would involve Syrian Kurdistan becoming de jure independent - she gains Kurdistani citizenship by residency and the Kurds try her, meaning that the British taxpayer doesn't have to pay for her legal aid, appeals, Channel 4 interviews etc.
How exactly would they intend to break off from Syria? No one in the region is going to allow that (not to mention everyone else)
Then again I imagine the Kurds would simply put her against the nearest wall thus solving everyones problems.
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If you could write then maybe I might be able to actually understand what you were on about...
(Original post by Napp)
Umm remind me how its my problem/fault that you don't seem to be able to read?
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