Is MSc, Cyber Security Engineering at WMG worth taking? Watch

mingyunyuansu
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Hi everyone,

I am an international student and plan to go to UK for MSc. At current I have received:

MSc Data Science, Bath
Information Security with 1 year placement, Queen's University Belfast
Cyber Security Engineering, WMG, Warwick
Computer Systems Engineering, Glasgow
Advanced Computer Science, Sheffield

To be honest I want to go for WMG the most because I want to work in security line in future, and Warwick has a good reputation in my country.

However I am not sure about how is this programme like. I find its course is kind of about telling student making informed decisions for stakeholders, or we say too much management-related, whereas I want to learn some pure techniques and principles in detailed theory behind applications. So, no elective module is also a strange thing.

Could anyone attended this course tell me some information? The information about this course is scarce in the Internet......

I am also thinking about MSc Information Security in Royal Holloway because I heared its reputation in this line. The question is that its general ranking is quite low (like QS. No offense but HR in my country thinks highly of that.) Any information in selecting or security business would be of help! Thank you!
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katie091000
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(Original post by mingyunyuansu)
Hi everyone,

I am an international student and plan to go to UK for MSc. At current I have received:

MSc Data Science, Bath
Information Security with 1 year placement, Queen's University Belfast
Cyber Security Engineering, WMG, Warwick
Computer Systems Engineering, Glasgow
Advanced Computer Science, Sheffield

To be honest I want to go for WMG the most because I want to work in security line in future, and Warwick has a good reputation in my country.

However I am not sure about how is this programme like. I find its course is kind of about telling student making informed decisions for stakeholders, or we say too much management-related, whereas I want to learn some pure techniques and principles in detailed theory behind applications. So, no elective module is also a strange thing.

Could anyone attended this course tell me some information? The information about this course is scarce in the Internet......

I am also thinking about MSc Information Security in Royal Holloway because I heared its reputation in this line. The question is that its general ranking is quite low (like QS. No offense but HR in my country thinks highly of that.) Any information in selecting or security business would be of help! Thank you!
Hi! So in regards to royal Holloway’s ranking it’s general ranking is 23rd, of course this is down to subjective opinion but I wouldn’t personally say this is a low ranking at all considering there are about 150 uni’s in total ranked on the complete university guide- it’s made significant progress this year in the rankings!
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mingyunyuansu
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(Original post by katie091000)
Hi! So in regards to royal Holloway’s ranking it’s general ranking is 23rd, of course this is down to subjective opinion but I wouldn’t personally say this is a low ranking at all considering there are about 150 uni’s in total ranked on the complete university guide- it’s made significant progress this year in the rankings!
Yeah, apology for my inappropriate word "quite low". Sometimes I use strange words... It's just that QS ranking is mostly used in my country, and on that RHUL is ranked 236 while Warwick's is 54, the gap is relatively huge though. So you know, I'm not sure how to balance between reputation and course per se.
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katie091000
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(Original post by mingyunyuansu)
Yeah, apology for my inappropriate word "quite low". Sometimes I use strange words... It's just that QS ranking is mostly used in my country, and on that RHUL is ranked 236 while Warwick's is 54, the gap is relatively huge though. So you know, I'm not sure how to balance between reputation and course per se.
Ah okay so that’s completely understandable- if I saw that huge gap as well I would be confused. I’m not sure why that is? On the complete university guide, (which is a main one used in the U.K.,) Warwick is 12th and Royal Holloway is 23. This is still quite a gap but Warwick have actually gone down whilst royal Holloway have gone up I personally chose royal Holloway because it was a much closer uni to me than ones like Warwick but also because I really liked it! Undeniably though Warwick is quite a bit higher than royal Holloway for computer science
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The National Cyber Security Centre
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(Original post by mingyunyuansu)
Yeah, apology for my inappropriate word "quite low". Sometimes I use strange words... It's just that QS ranking is mostly used in my country, and on that RHUL is ranked 236 while Warwick's is 54, the gap is relatively huge though. So you know, I'm not sure how to balance between reputation and course per se.
Whilst we're not in a position to comment on the detailed contents of courses, if it helps your decision the courses at both Warwick and RHUL have been successfully certified under the scheme we run here at the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), to recognise high-quality degrees in cyber security.

Whilst QS and other ranking schemes undoubtedly have a place, they do take a more high-level view of each university, and so areas of excellence are sometimes outweighed in the overall ranking. Our scheme focuses on individual degrees, and looks at the staff, facilities, degree content, assessments and dissertations, to ensure that relevant material is being taught by knowledgeable people in good facilities. It has been designed to answer the question of what a good cyber security degree might look like.

Of the other courses you mention the MSc Applied Cyber Security at Queen's is also certified under our scheme, so definitely worth taking a look at. The full list of NCSC-Certified degrees can be found at https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/...tified-degrees, with links to the relevant course pages where available. There's a wide variety of universities on the list, and the courses have different content, so hopefully there should be one of interest to most people. All of the courses have met the high standard that our scheme demands.

We hope this helps, but please do let us know if you have any other questions. Good luck with your search
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mingyunyuansu
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(Original post by The National Cyber Security Centre)
Whilst we're not in a position to comment on the detailed contents of courses, if it helps your decision the courses at both Warwick and RHUL have been successfully certified under the scheme we run here at the UK National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), to recognise high-quality degrees in cyber security.

Whilst QS and other ranking schemes undoubtedly have a place, they do take a more high-level view of each university, and so areas of excellence are sometimes outweighed in the overall ranking. Our scheme focuses on individual degrees, and looks at the staff, facilities, degree content, assessments and dissertations, to ensure that relevant material is being taught by knowledgeable people in good facilities. It has been designed to answer the question of what a good cyber security degree might look like.

Of the other courses you mention the MSc Applied Cyber Security at Queen's is also certified under our scheme, so definitely worth taking a look at. The full list of NCSC-Certified degrees can be found at https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/...tified-degrees, with links to the relevant course pages where available. There's a wide variety of universities on the list, and the courses have different content, so hopefully there should be one of interest to most people. All of the courses have met the high standard that our scheme demands.

We hope this helps, but please do let us know if you have any other questions. Good luck with your search
Thank you so much for the reply! It does help.
Though I am wondering what is the difference between a fully certified degree and a provisionally certified one. Let's say, in Warwick, MSc Cyber Security Management has been fully certified whilst MSc Cyber Security Engineering is only provisionally certified. Does this make some sense? Or is it just a matter of time (I know CSE was established after CSM so it's not strange to be "provisional", is it so) ?
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The National Cyber Security Centre
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(Original post by mingyunyuansu)
Thank you so much for the reply! It does help.
Though I am wondering what is the difference between a fully certified degree and a provisionally certified one. Let's say, in Warwick, MSc Cyber Security Management has been fully certified whilst MSc Cyber Security Engineering is only provisionally certified. Does this make some sense? Or is it just a matter of time (I know CSE was established after CSM so it's not strange to be "provisional", is it so) ?
Good question - there is no difference in the standard of fully or provisionally-certified degree courses; as you suggest the difference mainly relates to how long the courses have been running, and therefore whether the university has been able to furnish evidence of completed dissertations, student numbers, feedback and the external examiner's report, which are also required for Full certification.

In all cases (provisional and full) the courses have to reach the standard we set with respect to subject coverage, staff expertise, facilities and assessments.
Last edited by The National Cyber Security Centre; 3 weeks ago
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mingyunyuansu
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Thank you very much!
(Original post by The National Cyber Security Centre)
Good question - there is no difference in the standard of fully or partially-certified degree courses; as you suggest the difference mainly relates to how long the courses have been running, and therefore whether the university has been able to furnish evidence of completed dissertations, student numbers, feedback and the external examiner's report, which are also required for Full certification.

In all cases (provisional and full) the courses have to reach the standard we set with respect to subject coverage, staff expertise, facilities and assessments.
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