Is university harder than A Levels? Watch

Ratchet Hoe
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And if it is, how much harder is it?
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CoolCavy
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Yes
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KiwiBanana22
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Yes. Just as there is a jump up from GCSE to A level, there is another quantum leap to being an undergraduate. The more advanced the study, the more you are expected to do for yourself. The highly self motivated thrive on this and others flounder.
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Ratchet Hoe
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(Original post by KiwiBanana22)
Yes. Just as there is a jump up from GCSE to A level, there is another quantum leap to being an undergraduate. The more advanced the study, the more you are expected to do for yourself. The highly self motivated thrive on this and others flounder.
Are you able to cope with it however and do you ever has free time?
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username4340172
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In my opinion a lot harder
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_NMcC_
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In Natural Sciences (Chem, Bio, Physics), absolutely.

Doing well in my view is largely dependent on your ability to study independently without being 'force fed' material.

Lecturers will generally give you notes that on their own are enough for a good grade but if you want to get marks in 70s/80s, you have to be prepared to go to a library and read textbooks, online material and research papers to get the really high marks in questions.
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cheesecakelove
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(Original post by Ratchet Hoe)
Are you able to cope with it however and do you ever has free time?
It depends on how well you organise yourself and your studies. It may take some getting used to moving from A-Levels to a more independent and in-depth form of study, but if you keep on time of deadlines and engage yourself in the course, you should be able too cope with it. You should have free time too, depending on how well you manage your time. Keeping a list of tasks or creating a study timetable can help.
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Sinnoh
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Depends who you ask. My older brother told me his time at uni was so much easier than A-levels - tbf he no longer cared for his course in the slightest by the end and had possibly the worst attendance that anyone has ever passed with.
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Ccyxxx
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Al ot of people find uni less stressful as A levels you learn 3 subjects in a short space of time whereas Uni has course work not just exams, is more relaxed and spread out only the 3rd year is more stressful.
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Quick-use
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Yes and no.

Yes because the depth of study required is on a whole new level. During A levels, you're still learning mostly 'basic' information whereas at university, it's all very advanced and the responses required from you within the form of essays or otherwise need to be of an extremely high standard to even think of scraping an A.

No because A levels require you to go into class daily for several hours, study various subjects (some of which you may not care for at all), do continuous homework and do a lot of exam preparation. Whereas for university, you mostly only do subjects that interest you so it's not as chaotic. You can also plan in advance for your assignments as you're mostly only required to do 1 or 2 essays per semester per module. It's simpler in that regard.
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David Tan
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University education is definitely more difficult than 'A' level education. In the field of chemistry, what you are taught in physical chemistry such as the topic on chemical equilibrium are partially inaccurate. For instance, the equilibrium constant has no units but students are taught that it does. For university organic chemistry, students are expected to know their arrow pushing and skeletal structures very well. These are just some examples to highlight the difference in the knowledge taught at various stages of your learning curve. Hence, you got to adjust yourself and be flexible in your learning approach. As mentioned in the earlier post, there is no teacher to "spoon feed" you with the required knowledge and if you hope to survive in the university, you have to learn to be resourceful and be self-reliant. In short, be flexible, be resourceful and be self-reliant.

Hope it helps.
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ihatePE
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the work is harder and more in depth but not necessarily intense. Many attend classes for 10 hrs a week and have plenty of time to self develop. though if you choose: engineering/maths/physics/medicine/law, be prepared to attend classes almost everyday and sometimes 9-6 and then having to catch up afterwards for further reading. entirely depends on your course choice.
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IrrationalRoot
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Yes and I would be surprised if there were any exceptions. I can't imagine anyone finding it easier to get a first in a degree than do well at A Level, regardless of how 'easy' the course is.
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kkboyk
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(Original post by Quick-use)
No because A levels require you to go into class daily for several hours, study various subjects (some of which you may not care for at all), do continuous homework and do a lot of exam preparation. Whereas for university, you mostly only do subjects that interest you so it's not as chaotic. You can also plan in advance for your assignments as you're mostly only required to do 1 or 2 essays per semester per subjects. It's simpler in that regard.
Tbh this part doesn't apply to some degrees, stem courses in particular, which you'll have several hours of lessons, study various modules and continuous weekly homework (one per module at least). You'll also be given a wide range of subject within your course, making it feel like A-levels in a sort of way.
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Hammad(214508)
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Really depends on degree and even University. But in general , yes
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mnot
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(Original post by Ratchet Hoe)
And if it is, how much harder is it?
Yes,
although every uni & course is different. First year is a slight step up, but the jump is not too bad.
2nd, 3rd, 4th years are much more intense & difficult than a levels.

but again this is very course specific, for example business communications or media studies degree is probably pretty easy. Whereas anything STEM will be much harder...
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Quick-use
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(Original post by kkboyk)
Tbh this part doesn't apply to some degrees, stem courses in particular, which you'll have several hours of lessons, study various modules and continuous weekly homework (one per module at least). You'll also be given a wide range of subject within your course, making it feel like A-levels in a sort of way.
Ah, for those STEM courses, it's mostly lab work, right? As opposed to sitting down with a class and working. That's what I meant. I feel like tutes / lab work is a little different from classroom work. You get more things done and progress in the former whereas with classroom it's a little more chaotic. Not sure if I'm conveying myself well...
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ihatePE
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(Original post by Quick-use)
Ah, for those STEM courses, it's mostly lab work, right? As opposed to sitting down with a class and working. That's what I meant. I feel like tutes / lab work is a little different from classroom work. You get more things done and progress in the former whereas with classroom it's a little more chaotic. Not sure if I'm conveying myself well...
I did engineering first yr, I had lectures, tutorial and labs. lectures are so tedious and boring, tutorial is similar to lessons in school where we sat and discussed questions and answers, feels more personal. labs long and boring imo. that's just my opinion, others probably found it good
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ltsmith
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depends what university and what course.

maths at cambridge will be harder than a-levels but sport studies at london met won't be harder
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Vinny C
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Yes... esp yrs 2 and 3. Next question?
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