ampare.x
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Hey guys,

i am from the United Kingdom and i would like to apply to the US to study for university. But the problems is i do not know how to apply and what kind of exams will i take before i apply and try to apply ? Or would i even need to taken an exam to get a place >
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ecolier
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(Original post by ampare.x)
Hey guys,

i am from the United Kingdom and i would like to apply to the US to study for university. But the problems is i do not know how to apply and what kind of exams will i take before i apply and try to apply ? Or would i even need to taken an exam to get a place >
Well done for moving on from your teacher crush.

The American school system and the UK school system is slightly (understatement) different.

Why do you want to study there?
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ampare.x
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;(

Oh okay. I would want to study journalism over there.
(Original post by ecolier)
Well done for moving on from your teacher crush.

The American school system and the UK school system is slightly (understatement) different.

Why do you want to study there?
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ecolier
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(Original post by ampare.x)
;(

Oh okay. I would want to study journalism over there.
US journalism? I would have to stop myself from saying things I might regret haha.

I don't know too much about studying in the US (especially journalism), hopefully someone more knowledgeable will answer your Q.

Good luck.
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ampare.x
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Yea US journalism Oh okay... Why would you say something you regret lol ? Also would you know anyone who could help me ? That would be awesome if you did..


(Original post by ecolier)
US journalism? I would have to stop myself from saying things I might regret haha.

I don't know too much about studying in the US (especially journalism), hopefully someone more knowledgeable will answer your Q.

Good luck.
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ecolier
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(Original post by ampare.x)
...Why would you say something you regret lol ?
Don't really want to derail the thread with off-topic content :rofl:

Also would you know anyone who could help me ? That would be awesome if you did..
You have posted in the right forum, but remember TSR is UK-based so responses are not going to be coming in thick and fast, let's put it that way!
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ampare.x
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Oh okay.. Nope lol
(Original post by ecolier)
Don't really want to derail the thread with off-topic content :rofl:



You have posted in the right forum, but remember TSR is UK-based so responses are not going to be coming in thick and fast, let's put it that way!
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HedgePig
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I’m no expert at all but know a little about the process. So until someone more knowledgeable comes along and posts, here are a few points.
1. It’s expensive. Think $250,000++ for a four year degree. Scholarships and grants are available but pretty tough to get for an international student.
2. The application process is much, much more complicated than in the UK. There is a “common app” form - but not all universities use it. And most that do require additional information - which varies with each application. So essentially you have to put together an application for each university you apply to.
3. The application process is much more expensive as you have to pay for each application - each one of which will be much more expensive than UCAS.($100+ per application.) But if you can afford the fees, this is small potatoes.
4. The application process is much more “holistic” and things like extra curricular are very important. People often talk about having a “hook” which is something interesting in you application that hooks the admissions officer - like the fact that you won a national oboe playing competition or saved someone from drowning or volunteered at a charity and raised £25,000 pounds or cured cancer. (As you may gather I’m a little cynical about this process - but you really do have to blow your own trumpet loudly) Having said that, your academic results are still the most important unless you have a truly fantastic hook.
5. You’ll probably apply to many more universities than you would in the UK. There is no limit on the number and rejection rates are much, much higher - partly because the decision making process is more opaque. You really need to look at each universty’s requirements. You’ll also become familiar with terms like “early decision” and “regular decision” applications.
6. You’ll almost certainly need to take at least least the SAT or ACT standardised test. These are very similar and you only need one - they test a combination of English, math(s) and reasoning. GCSE level maths should be fine but definitely prepare - you can buy plenty of of prep materials online. Some universities are “SAT/ACT optional” meaning you don’t have to submit a score but most are not. You can take the SAT/ACT more than once - usually universities will consider your best score. Some “super score” meaning they look at the best combination of subscores (the SAT / ACT is broken down into a couple of sections)
7. For top level universities you probably need to submit SAT II results as well. The SAT II’s are subject specific tests.
8. US degrees are generally much less focused than UK degrees. In most cases you don’t apply for a specific major although might indicate what you intend to major in. But you can change your mind. Eventually you will have to “declare” your major and will need enough relevant credits in that area. I know someone whose declared major started as “pre-med” (for medicine) went on to accounting, law and finally settled on Latin.
9. Many universities require you to take some “core curriculum” courses - so you might need to take some sciencey courses if your general direction is artsy and vice versa. Exactly what these requirements are varies from university to university. Each one will have an explanation as to why their particular approach is the best.
10. Lots of information at collegeconfidential.com although it might take a while to become familiar with all the new terminology.

Hope this helps a little.
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ampare.x
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Thank you so much!!! would it be easier to get into an american university than a UK one ?
(Original post by HedgePig)
I’m no expert at all but know a little about the process. So until someone more knowledgeable comes along and posts, here are a few points.
1. It’s expensive. Think $250,000++ for a four year degree. Scholarships and grants are available but pretty tough to get for an international student.
2. The application process is much, much more complicated than in the UK. There is a “common app” form - but not all universities use it. And most that do require additional information - which varies with each application. So essentially you have to put together an application for each university you apply to.
3. The application process is much more expensive as you have to pay for each application - each one of which will be much more expensive than UCAS.($100+ per application.) But if you can afford the fees, this is small potatoes.
4. The application process is much more “holistic” and things like extra curricular are very important. People often talk about having a “hook” which is something interesting in you application that hooks the admissions officer - like the fact that you won a national oboe playing competition or saved someone from drowning or volunteered at a charity and raised £25,000 pounds or cured cancer. (As you may gather I’m a little cynical about this process - but you really do have to blow your own trumpet loudly) Having said that, your academic results are still the most important unless you have a truly fantastic hook.
5. You’ll probably apply to many more universities than you would in the UK. There is no limit on the number and rejection rates are much, much higher - partly because the decision making process is more opaque. You really need to look at each universty’s requirements. You’ll also become familiar with terms like “early decision” and “regular decision” applications.
6. You’ll almost certainly need to take at least least the SAT or ACT standardised test. These are very similar and you only need one - they test a combination of English, math(s) and reasoning. GCSE level maths should be fine but definitely prepare - you can buy plenty of of prep materials online. Some universities are “SAT/ACT optional” meaning you don’t have to submit a score but most are not. You can take the SAT/ACT more than once - usually universities will consider your best score. Some “super score” meaning they look at the best combination of subscores (the SAT / ACT is broken down into a couple of sections)
7. For top level universities you probably need to submit SAT II results as well. The SAT II’s are subject specific tests.
8. US degrees are generally much less focused than UK degrees. In most cases you don’t apply for a specific major although might indicate what you intend to major in. But you can change your mind. Eventually you will have to “declare” your major and will need enough relevant credits in that area. I know someone whose declared major started as “pre-med” (for medicine) went on to accounting, law and finally settled on Latin.
9. Many universities require you to take some “core curriculum” courses - so you might need to take some sciencey courses if your general direction is artsy and vice versa. Exactly what these requirements are varies from university to university. Each one will have an explanation as to why their particular approach is the best.
10. Lots of information at collegeconfidential.com although it might take a while to become familiar with all the new terminology.

Hope this helps a little.
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HedgePig
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(Original post by ampare.x)
Thank you so much!!! would it be easier to get into an american university than a UK one ?
I guess it would be easier to get into a university or college in the USA than in the UK - if you don’t mind where you go or the quality of education. There are around 4,000 colleges and universities and I’m sure some of them are going to be happy to take your money as long as you have a pulse. (The difference between a college and a university is I believe that a college cannot award PhDs. But don’t use this as a criterion, there are some outstanding colleges that are extremely selective. They offer really good undergraduate education.)

Is it easier to get into one of a comparable standard? I think that as a foreigner it would be more difficult. However, it does also depend on your strengths. As mentioned before, UK universities are far more focused on your academic strengths as evidenced by standardised tests such as A levels. US universities look at you more holistically but unless you have some truly outstanding achievement, your academics still have to be good.

There is much wider range of universities and colleges in the US than in the UK. There are many small colleges (one or two thousand students or even smaller), some of which are excellent and some of which.....are not. There are also quite a few really large places (50,000+ students) and everything in between. If you are looking at an I ranked or lowly ranked US university or college, I suspect you’d be MUCH better off in the UK unless you have money to burn.
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theholychilli
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Northwestern University has a great journalism school (one of the best in the US), and they offer brilliant financial aid (if you need it) -- there's also scholarships available to international students applying to their school of journalism (which there is no separate application for, you just apply normally to NU throught the Common App and they assess whether you are suited for it). Even if you don't get the scholarship, they more than likely will give a good financial aid package that is affordable for you and your family.

There is an amazing programme called the Sutton Trust US Programme, which you apply for in Year 12. The criteria for the programme is here: https://us.suttontrust.com/apply/eli...and-selection/, but to be eligible you must attend, and always have attended, a state school or college in the UK, not hold US citizenship, be from a low-income family (generally less than £45k/year) and be interested in US culture and higher education. They also have additonal criteria which you can see on the website, examples include obtaining excellent GCSE results (at least eight at grade A or 7 or above), and your academic performance and potential.

If you don't meet the eligibilty/criteria, you can take a look on the Fulbright US-UK website. There's loads of information about applying, the tests, and all that to get you started.

If you are in years 9-11 I would recommend getting in some good extracurriculars now to boost your applications. And yes -- US applications and university itself is expensive. But some universities (mostly private) offer excellent financial aid for good international applicants.
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ampare.x
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Thank you very much for this information. but what if i want to attend a US uni and am not that academically bright... will i still have a chance to attend one.
(Original post by theholychilli)
Northwestern University has a great journalism school (one of the best in the US), and they offer brilliant financial aid (if you need it) -- there's also scholarships available to international students applying to their school of journalism (which there is no separate application for, you just apply normally to NU throught the Common App and they assess whether you are suited for it). Even if you don't get the scholarship, they more than likely will give a good financial aid package that is affordable for you and your family.

There is an amazing programme called the Sutton Trust US Programme, which you apply for in Year 12. The criteria for the programme is here: https://us.suttontrust.com/apply/eli...and-selection/, but to be eligible you must attend, and always have attended, a state school or college in the UK, not hold US citizenship, be from a low-income family (generally less than £45k/year) and be interested in US culture and higher education. They also have additonal criteria which you can see on the website, examples include obtaining excellent GCSE results (at least eight at grade A or 7 or above), and your academic performance and potential.

If you don't meet the eligibilty/criteria, you can take a look on the Fulbright US-UK website. There's loads of information about applying, the tests, and all that to get you started.

If you are in years 9-11 I would recommend getting in some good extracurriculars now to boost your applications. And yes -- US applications and university itself is expensive. But some universities (mostly private) offer excellent financial aid for good international applicants.
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mnot
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(Original post by ampare.x)
Thank you very much for this information. but what if i want to attend a US uni and am not that academically bright... will i still have a chance to attend one.
So the US admissions process is much more complex.
You apply with an individual essays & questions for every Uni.

You will also need to complete either the ACT or SAT (these are standardized tests) which will sit alongside your A-levels to represent your academic potential.

Attending US unis without scholarships or 'in-state' aid (what 90% of US students get) is much harder and more expensive, you will be writing huge checks every year.

If yur grades are not good it means you cant go to the good universities, or even the decent ones if you get BCC at A-level your going to stuck looking at the lower tier Unis, if you get ABB mid-tier Unis, if you get A*AA+ you can apply for Unis such as Yale or Berkeley...

The US system is also very very different where you studying a much wider variety of subjects at Uni (you have to study a certain amount of english, math, history, science... modules every year, then about 50% of your modules are focused on your 'major')
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CaspertheOctopus
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I'm a US student, and while I may not be able to help you with the specifics of applying from the UK, I can at least give you an overview of how applications work here.Generally, I believe UK students are still highly reccomended to sit the SAT or ACT. Both tests are pretty easy- they test up to what is Alg 2 here for math and has a fairly simple English section. Doesn't matter which test you take, unis will rate them pretty much equal. Score ranges are online and it isn't uncommon for US students to take these tests multiple times. Both are pretty much 90% multiple choice.From my understanding testing is much less a part of US admissions than UK ones. The only real number that matters gradewise in the US is called your GPA. This number is basically a summary of how you did in each course you took all averaged together. I don't believe most UK students are given a GPA, so I'd recommend either emailing the college admissions site on what to put here or asking someone at your school. *Do not put your A-levels here, unless told by an admissions councilor, I don't believe they are equivalent, and also our GPAs are generally calculated off of 20 or 30 classes we've taken during grades 9-12 (ages about 14-18)Depending on where you apply, the university may have an official site for admissions. If they don't, they may tell you to apply on Common App. The Common App is what admissions officers call holistic so they include your extracurriculars which may help bulk out a bad mark.

Aside from that keep in mind that US university is expensive particularly without scholarships and that because of foreign quotas if you apply from outside the US a school is probably only allowed to accept about 5% of its population being overseas.
Last edited by CaspertheOctopus; 1 month ago
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ampare.x
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oh okay.. is the standardised tests difficult ? Even if i am not that bright will i be able to go to a normal uni in the states ?
(Original post by mnot)
So the US admissions process is much more complex.
You apply with an individual essays & questions for every Uni.

You will also need to complete either the ACT or SAT (these are standardized tests) which will sit alongside your A-levels to represent your academic potential.

Attending US unis without scholarships or 'in-state' aid (what 90% of US students get) is much harder and more expensive, you will be writing huge checks every year.

If yur grades are not good it means you cant go to the good universities, or even the decent ones if you get BCC at A-level your going to stuck looking at the lower tier Unis, if you get ABB mid-tier Unis, if you get A*AA+ you can apply for Unis such as Yale or Berkeley...

The US system is also very very different where you studying a much wider variety of subjects at Uni (you have to study a certain amount of english, math, history, science... modules every year, then about 50% of your modules are focused on your 'major')
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ampare.x
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Oh okay.. so there is a limted chance of me being able to go the a US uni because they only accept 5% of those who are from overseas. Also does your GPA need to be high for you to get into a decent uni if the person is from overseas.. Would you have to be academically good to enter a US uni
(Original post by CaspertheOctopus)
I'm a US student, and while I may not be able to help you with the specifics of applying from the UK, I can at least give you an overview of how applications work here.Generally, I believe UK students are still highly reccomended to sit the SAT or ACT. Both tests are pretty easy- they test up to what is Alg 2 here for math and has a fairly simple English section. Doesn't matter which test you take, unis will rate them pretty much equal. Score ranges are online and it isn't uncommon for US students to take these tests multiple times. Both are pretty much 90% multiple choice.From my understanding testing is much less a part of US admissions than UK ones. The only real number that matters gradewise in the US is called your GPA. This number is basically a summary of how you did in each course you took all averaged together. I don't believe most UK students are given a GPA, so I'd recommend either emailing the college admissions site on what to put here or asking someone at your school. *Do not put your A-levels here, unless told by an admissions councilor, I don't believe they are equivalent, and also our GPAs are generally calculated off of 20 or 30 classes we've taken during grades 9-12 (ages about 14-18)Depending on where you apply, the university may have an official site for admissions. If they don't, they may tell you to apply on Common App. The Common App is what admissions officers call holistic so they include your extracurriculars which may help bulk out a bad mark.

Aside from that keep in mind that US university is expensive particularly without scholarships and that because of foreign quotas if you apply from outside the US a school is probably only allowed to accept about 5% of its population being overseas.
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theholychilli
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If you need full/good financial aid, then I apologise, but it's a very small chance. If you can afford to pay the fees (which can go up to $75k/year) then there are unis that you could get into, or there could be scholarships.

I 100% recommend checking the Fulbright UK-US website
(Original post by ampare.x)
Thank you very much for this information. but what if i want to attend a US uni and am not that academically bright... will i still have a chance to attend one.
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Galeriapaints
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(Original post by ampare.x)
Hey guys,

i am from the United Kingdom and i would like to apply to the US to study for university. But the problems is i do not know how to apply and what kind of exams will i take before i apply and try to apply ? Or would i even need to taken an exam to get a place >
You have to go directly to the University website.
Click on the degree you want to do.
Find where the application button is on the webpage.
Look at what the application requirements are.

If you don't like it... look for a University in Europe.
Now, the tuition fees in the US and UK are pretty much the same.
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theholychilli
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(Original post by Galeriapaints)
You have to go directly to the University website.
Click on the degree you want to do.
Find where the application button is on the webpage.
Look at what the application requirements are.

If you don't like it... look for a University in Europe.
Now, the tuition fees in the US and UK are pretty much the same.
Tuition fees are definitely not pretty much the same. In the US tuition fees can go up to $50,000 with the full cost of attendance (tuition+dorm+food+books+persona l expenses) going up to $75,000, this is completely different to UK tuition fees
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Galeriapaints
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Did you miss the news about tuition fees increasing in England?? ...
Also have you looked at the exchange rate between the dollar and the pound...???
(Original post by theholychilli)
Tuition fees are definitely not pretty much the same. In the US tuition fees can go up to $50,000 with the full cost of attendance (tuition+dorm+food+books+persona l expenses) going up to $75,000, this is completely different to UK tuition fees
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