rfg22
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Hi TSR,

I'm looking to take three fast track A-Levels, but I need some guidance. I live in Scotland, I currently can't afford to take an expensive A-Level course where you take multiple A-Levels fast tracked via a College with tutor support (Plus I think it is too late to register for anything like that now aside from distance learning). I know certain colleges will offer fast track A-Levels, but these are far too expensive for me. Ideally I would be at an actual college doing these with in person support, but from what I've seen that costs around about ~£20,000 and I can barely afford £1,000, nevermind ~£20,000!

What would everyone recommend with that in mind? I'm currently planning to pay, but only to pay for the exams themselves, and then self-study using the specification and past papers as a guide. However, I am quite confused at the moment, with the whole procedure - which is the major downside of doing this all alone. I've never even sat an A-Level before, being from Scotland, this is all new to me. I'd like to take Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Politics at A-Level. I'm already doing around ~6 hours a day of Mathematics, and I feel very confident that by the time the exams come around I can perform well, so long as I have a good grasp of the process.

However, whenever I look into Further Mathematics, there are so many options which leads to me being confused and demotivated. What exactly do I have to sit, and when do I have to sit it? Do I have to complete certain modules prior to sitting the final year exam, are there exams mid year etc etc? What's the general procedure if I sit this and my other two A-Levels (Mathematics and Politics) as an external student who is not enrolled with a college and only paying to sit the exams themselves.

Any advice and guidance is appreciated.
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adam271
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What is it you intend to study at uni?
Most people don't bother self teaching A-levels due to the hassle.

It should be straight forward but exam boards don't really care about private candidates.

That being said there are many other paths to take other then self teaching A-levels.
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rfg22
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What is it you intend to study at uni?
Most people don't bother self teaching A-levels due to the hassle.

It should be straight forward but exam boards don't really care about private candidates.

That being said there are many other paths to take other then self teaching A-levels.
I haven't decided for sure, but I was leaning towards either Classics or Economics.

I'm doing double Math mainly because I feel like I'll do better in my exams than with say an essay based subject. Getting A's is really the main goal, I wouldn't feel as confident doing that in a subject like English or History. I'm too rusty. Plus, it cuts the workload down a little bit, I've read people on TSR say M/FM is more akin to 1.5 A-Levels.

It also just keeps my options open incase I decide I want to go for a more science based subject. I haven't really decided for sure what I'd like to study at university, but I hope to apply to some of the top universities and it seems like most of those prefer A-levels which is predominately why I'm willing willing to go through the hassle.
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ozzyoscy
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From adam271's reply, I can see this is about self-studying A Levels, which I have experience with.

But once again TSR has made the first post disappear, so I can't help as I don't know what was asked. (I made a thread about this bug ages ago and it was ignored.)
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(Original post by rfg22)
Hi TSR,

I'm looking to take three fast track A-Levels, but I need some guidance. I live in Scotland, I currently can't afford to take an expensive A-Level course where you take multiple A-Levels fast tracked via a College with tutor support (Plus I think it is too late to register for anything like that now aside from distance learning). I know certain colleges will offer fast track A-Levels, but these are far too expensive for me. Ideally I would be at an actual college doing these with in person support, but from what I've seen that costs around about ~£20,000 and I can barely afford £1,000, nevermind ~£20,000!

What would everyone recommend with that in mind? I'm currently planning to pay, but only to pay for the exams themselves, and then self-study using the specification and past papers as a guide. However, I am quite confused at the moment, with the whole procedure - which is the major downside of doing this all alone. I've never even sat an A-Level before, being from Scotland, this is all new to me. I'd like to take Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Politics at A-Level. I'm already doing around ~6 hours a day of Mathematics, and I feel very confident that by the time the exams come around I can perform well, so long as I have a good grasp of the process.

However, whenever I look into Further Mathematics, there are so many options which leads to me being confused and demotivated. What exactly do I have to sit, and when do I have to sit it? Do I have to complete certain modules prior to sitting the final year exam, are there exams mid year etc etc? What's the general procedure if I sit this and my other two A-Levels (Mathematics and Politics) as an external student who is not enrolled with a college and only paying to sit the exams themselves.

Any advice and guidance is appreciated.
There you go
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How old are you?
If your a mature student and your taking mathematics with no intention of doing it at university I don't think it will look as good as a 17 year old doing it for example.

Durham offer very foundation programmes that are highly rated that can help you get into university. Not just at Durham but at other highly ranked universities.


But for FM your options should be do
FM math paper 1 and 2 (mandatory)
For paper 3 you choose either statistics, mechanics or discrete mathematics.
This should be still correct for the AQA spec.

But each school uses a different exam board. Also will they offer all 3 of the 3rd paper options or just the mechanics paper for example.
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ozzyoscy
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Thanks, looks like they fixed it although confusingly you're officially the 'thread starter' now.
(Original post by rfg22)
Hi TSR,

I'm looking to take three fast track A-Levels, but I need some guidance. I live in Scotland, I currently can't afford to take an expensive A-Level course where you take multiple A-Levels fast tracked via a College with tutor support (Plus I think it is too late to register for anything like that now aside from distance learning). I know certain colleges will offer fast track A-Levels, but these are far too expensive for me. Ideally I would be at an actual college doing these with in person support, but from what I've seen that costs around about ~£20,000 and I can barely afford £1,000, nevermind ~£20,000!

What would everyone recommend with that in mind? I'm currently planning to pay, but only to pay for the exams themselves, and then self-study using the specification and past papers as a guide. However, I am quite confused at the moment, with the whole procedure - which is the major downside of doing this all alone. I've never even sat an A-Level before, being from Scotland, this is all new to me. I'd like to take Mathematics, Further Mathematics and Politics at A-Level. I'm already doing around ~6 hours a day of Mathematics, and I feel very confident that by the time the exams come around I can perform well, so long as I have a good grasp of the process.

However, whenever I look into Further Mathematics, there are so many options which leads to me being confused and demotivated. What exactly do I have to sit, and when do I have to sit it? Do I have to complete certain modules prior to sitting the final year exam, are there exams mid year etc etc? What's the general procedure if I sit this and my other two A-Levels (Mathematics and Politics) as an external student who is not enrolled with a college and only paying to sit the exams themselves.

Any advice and guidance is appreciated.
Things in Scotland can be different, so I'm talking about my experience with England.

Those costs you're seeing are for the upper class and are private and tutorial colleges and shouldn't be a consideration. I think nowadays especially though, A Levels as a physical course are hard to find. Your best, perhaps only, option is indeed to self-study, though you might find a private tutor that'll cost a bit to help intermittently. However it might not be as easy as it feels. You can have a grasp of the content, know how the exams work, and do a month of hardcore final revision and mocks, and still get a U. GCSEs are simple in comparison, A Levels want longer answers with key words used and it's more of a race. You don't know until you try it. If you're really apt at exams then maybe you'll be fine, but Access courses may be a better option.

The procedure to self-study A Levels is simple: look up your local schools and colleges and see if they provide information on external / private candidates for A Levels. AQA (or Edexcel) provided a slightly outdated list of institutions that had previously accepted candidates. I did exams at a tutorial college, another college, and then a more convenient school (where everyone was pint-sized). If they accept external candidates, you pay them for the exams (around £20 per unit I think) and they register you, then you just have to turn up on the day.

What you have to sit for Maths and Further Maths depends on the board, and A Levels have been reformed since I did it so it'll probably be different. When I did it, it was made up of Further Maths units then you picked another one or two of your choosing.

You set your own time limit. You can do them all in one year, spread it over 2 years, more if you want and aren't worried about it looking bad. Restrictions are from colleges to stretch it out, not the board. There aren't mid-year exams any more, unless they still do that in Scotland.
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rfg22
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One of my posts has been waiting to be approved for a little while, so it might show up later, but I wrote it before you responded. Thank you for for all that information Ozzy. It's nice to know that I can spread it over two years if I feel that's necessary. I still have until around January before I have to register for the exams, so I can see how comfortable I feel by the time that deadline come around. How did you do and how did you find it?

Do you recommend any specific exam board for Mathematics and Further Mathematics, which will give me the best chance of success at achieving a good grade? I understand that they're all supposed to be broadly similar, but I've read stories about how difficult the Edexcel exam was this year, so perhaps I should do it through Edexcel.

The thinking is that, if I can master the harder material from this years and any previous years Edexcel exams I will surely be in a good position for the 2020 exams. It can't get much harder I would imagine, at least if what I was reading about how difficult this years exams were is true. I had initially been planning to do it with AQA, but maybe Edexcel is the better choice with all that in mind.

In regards to an access course, I don't think it is right for me. I'm looking towards applying for a mature Cambridge college, or maybe even a standard age one, but the deadline is much closer and I don't have time to feel things out if I go down that route. Plus, I think a mature environment is probably more my pace these days anyway

I've read that A-Levels are much preferred, and I also just really like the flexibility and preparation that they provide. I will have more options and can hopefully be more competitive for a place at certain universities. I don't know if I am being unrealistic, but I want to give it a solid shot at least. I'm confident that I can get the grades I need.
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ozzyoscy
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(Original post by rfg22)
One of my posts has been waiting to be approved for a little while, so it might show up later, but I wrote it before you responded. Thank you for for all that information Ozzy. It's nice to know that I can spread it over two years if I feel that's necessary. I still have until around January before I have to register for the exams, so I can see how comfortable I feel by the time that deadline come around. How did you do and how did you find it?

Do you recommend any specific exam board for Mathematics and Further Mathematics, which will give me the best chance of success at achieving a good grade? I understand that they're all supposed to be broadly similar, but I've read stories about how difficult the Edexcel exam was this year, so perhaps I should do it through Edexcel.

The thinking is that, if I can master the harder material from this years and any previous years Edexcel exams I will surely be in a good position for the 2020 exams. It can't get much harder I would imagine, at least if what I was reading about how difficult this years exams were is true. I had initially been planning to do it with AQA, but maybe Edexcel is the better choice with all that in mind.

In regards to an access course, I don't think it is right for me. I'm looking towards applying for a mature Cambridge college, or maybe even a standard age one, but the deadline is much closer and I don't have time to feel things out if I go down that route. Plus, I think a mature environment is probably more my pace these days anyway

I've read that A-Levels are much preferred, and I also just really like the flexibility and preparation that they provide. I will have more options and can hopefully be more competitive for a place at certain universities. I don't know if I am being unrealistic, but I want to give it a solid shot at least. I'm confident that I can get the grades I need.
Self-studying A Levels didn't go great for me, but I got a Physics A Level, just not a B or higher. I understood all of the Physics and Maths, but in the exams either I was working too purposefully and didn't have enough time or there was one or two questions I wasn't sure on, which with the grade boundaries at the time meant you're screwed. My final exam went perfectly and I got a U with no idea why. It would've been less depressing if I wasn't doing science A Levels, which have practical units and cost around £1000 each, and you're not allowed funding. In hindsight I would much rather have the time and money back.

At the time, Edexcel was the one everyone used. All the revision sites etc. were based on Edexcel. I don't know about now. I heard about that one exam being too hard, but this happens every year with every board. When I did Chemistry with AQA, experiments were literally exploding in people's faces (luckily I had the wiseness to always let others go first!).

Difficulty is only a part of it. When I was revising, you could've given me the hardest questions with all the triangles, differentations and formulas you wanted and I could probably figure it out. In an exam, for some reason it can be different for people. The difficulty might not be in the sum itself, but how it's worded, vagueness, a typo, how it expects an answer and how long each question really takes.

I got a U in my Maths A Levels, but at GCSE I was A*. They're very different beasts it seems.

If you're looking for a mature environment, Access is the one, not A Levels. On an A Level course you'll have kids around 17 usually, but an Access course is literally for mature students, so you can get a range: 20s, 30s, 40-somethings. But if your heart is set in Cambridge and you know that is ideal for you without doubt, then your choice is made by process of elimination anyway.

I felt exactly the same way as you. I was heavily advised by several people to do Access, but I felt A Levels was the 'proper' route and gave me more options like Oxford/Cambridge (maybe at the time that was true, but it isn't so much now). I had the money for it so thought it was worth a try, though as I said I feel different now. But who knows, maybe having that A Level knowledge will make Access better for me now than if I went straight to Access. There will still be the odd uni that don't accept it for certain subjects or still require an A Level or 2 along with it, mainly Oxbridge. Of the few I contacted regarding physics/maths, only one said it would only be good enough for foundation year. (Foundation year is another option for non-Oxbridge btw.)

I don't mean for it to look like a biased reply getting you to do Access (or Foundation), I'm just sharing my experience honestly. There will be some who self-studied A Levels and got AAA I'm sure.
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rfg22
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You don't look biased in the slightest, I am so thankful for such an honest and insightful response. You've definitely given me pause for thought, and managed to scare the living daylights out of me. You didn't give yourself an easy route, I can see that much, even attempting Chemistry and Physics with no support is quite something.

There ought to be more support for mature students doing the sort of thing you did. I really commend universities like Durham who give pathways with foundation years, but I wished more universities than currently do would step up to the plate in that regard and offer more places for mature students, in the same sort of way that we now see them starting to step up to the plate in regards to widening participation.

Mature students are much more under the radar, but education is so important, and I know from your story you'll know the feeling of frustration wishing you had adequate support in the same sort of way that high school students do. That's my own primary frustration right now. Everyone can work hard, but sometimes you need that guidance and support to get you over the line, mature students even more so.

Take Mathematics, how prepared did you feel on the day of any of the given exams? Did you truly feel yourself that you were ready for it? My heart is pretty set that's true, it isn't only the academic side of Cambridge, but the city and university are so damn beautiful. I could happily spend a few years there. It's also good for me to set myself such goals, it helps drive me forward, so even if I fall short I'll hopefully land in a good place.
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ozzyoscy
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(Original post by rfg22)
You don't look biased in the slightest, I am so thankful for such an honest and insightful response. You've definitely given me pause for thought, and managed to scare the living daylights out of me. You didn't give yourself an easy route, I can see that much, even attempting Chemistry and Physics with no support is quite something.

There ought to be more support for mature students doing the sort of thing you did. I really commend universities like Durham who give pathways with foundation years, but I wished more universities than currently do would step up to the plate in that regard and offer more places for mature students, in the same sort of way that we now see them starting to step up to the plate in regards to widening participation.

Mature students are much more under the radar, but education is so important, and I know from your story you'll know the feeling of frustration wishing you had adequate support in the same sort of way that high school students do. That's my own primary frustration right now. Everyone can work hard, but sometimes you need that guidance and support to get you over the line, mature students even more so.

Take Mathematics, how prepared did you feel on the day of any of the given exams? Did you truly feel yourself that you were ready for it? My heart is pretty set that's true, it isn't only the academic side of Cambridge, but the city and university are so damn beautiful. I could spend a few years there, very happily. It's also good for me to set myself such goals, it helps drive me forward, so even if I fall short I'll hopefully land in a good place.
I felt fine on the day. In fact I got a bit of abuse on this site when I said one exam was surprisingly easy. But I still ran out of time and got a U, so it's an odd juxtaposition. It was the same with the U in my final exam I mentioned where it went perfectly. That was a practical Physics unit, so it was a course in a classroom and very routine. In fact, in the other practical unit I got a B. Yet somehow this time I got barely anything. When I emailed the tutor I got no reply, so in that sense I got no support.

But I preferred self-studying as I found classes too slow. As you see from the cost, I was priced out of doing a 5-figure course anyway. Especially when it was basically the same concept - textbooks, practise questions, do mocks, revise. Just at home instead of a classroom.

If they were free, and assuming you're young, I'd say try A Levels anyway. For 5 figures hanging over your head before you even get to uni, I'd personally say no way. Then I'd say just do it yourself and/or have a private tutor for much cheaper. You might even find one who went to Cambridge themselves. Even free on YouTube there are really good videos, effectively lessons, on everything, and anything not understood is asked and answered on sites like this one. Maybe self-studying to AS Level and seeing how it goes could be an option?

£20,000 is more than most people make in a year and is just not an option if you can't afford it, like I said before that's for people whose parents make way more than that. Especially as you don't know if it'll be all it's cracked up to be. Maybe the tutor that year is particularly bad, or next door is doing DIY on the day of an exam (as happened with me once) or it's 35C and there are no windows. Or simply something happens or you get sick and you can't go to most classes or even the exam. Goals are fine, but the risk:reward ratio seems really unpleasant for that money.
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rfg22
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(Original post by ozzyoscy)
I felt fine on the day. In fact I got a bit of abuse on this site when I said one exam was surprisingly easy. But I still ran out of time and got a U, so it's an odd juxtaposition. It was the same with the U in my final exam I mentioned where it went perfectly. That was a practical Physics unit, so it was a course in a classroom and very routine. In fact, in the other practical unit I got a B. Yet somehow this time I got barely anything. When I emailed the tutor I got no reply, so in that sense I got no support.

But I preferred self-studying as I found classes too slow. As you see from the cost, I was priced out of doing a 5-figure course anyway. Especially when it was basically the same concept - textbooks, practise questions, do mocks, revise. Just at home instead of a classroom.

If they were free, and assuming you're young, I'd say try A Levels anyway. For 5 figures hanging over your head before you even get to uni, I'd personally say no way. Then I'd say just do it yourself and/or have a private tutor for much cheaper. You might even find one who went to Cambridge themselves. Even free on YouTube there are really good videos, effectively lessons, on everything, and anything not understood is asked and answered on sites like this one. Maybe self-studying to AS Level and seeing how it goes could be an option?

£20,000 is more than most people make in a year and is just not an option if you can't afford it, like I said before that's for people whose parents make way more than that. Especially as you don't know if it'll be all it's cracked up to be. Maybe the tutor that year is particularly bad, or next door is doing DIY on the day of an exam (as happened with me once) or it's 35C and there are no windows. Or simply something happens or you get sick and you can't go to most classes or even the exam. Goals are fine, but the risk:reward ratio seems really unpleasant for that money.
Damn, that sucks, I can't imagine how frustrating that must have been. Did you time yourself to practice beforehand at all, because that's what I'm primarily going to do to hopefully avoid that sort of scenario where I run short on time or completely run out of time. How have things worked out post all that, did you move towards an access programme or foundation programme and what's your current trajectory if you don't mind me asking.

You may have misunderstood me though, I have no intention of taking A-Levels with an expensive school or college. I'm going to go at it alone, or perhaps pay a little bit to get some materials and support via distance learning but that's much, much, much cheaper. I'm not even sure that that's worth either in some respects though to be honest.
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(Original post by rfg22)
Damn, that sucks, I can't imagine how frustrating that must have been. Did you time yourself to practice beforehand at all, because that's what I'm primarily going to do to hopefully avoid that sort of scenario where I run short on time or completely run out of time. How have things worked out post all that, did you move towards an access programme or foundation programme and what's your current trajectory if you don't mind me asking.

You may have misunderstood me though, I have no intention of taking A-Levels with an expensive school or college. I'm going to go at it alone, or perhaps pay a little bit to get some materials and support via distance learning but that's much, much, much cheaper. I'm not even sure that that's worth either in some respects though to be honest.
After that I worked, and now I'm hopefully doing an Access course. I applied to a college and I'm having a routine English and Maths assessment, so hopefully that means I'm pretty much on it now. This course won't have exams, it'll just be short essays and coursework. I'll know by the end if I'm cut out for uni structure. If I flop at that, the only option left would be a foundation year. I'm not sure what else I would do.

Before the A Level reform, and given you were already considering doing it over 2 years, the best route in my view would've been doinging AS Level exams next summer to see how you do. I don't know if that's still an option now; I forgot they changed it so there's an exam after 2 years and AS is meaningless now. But maybe you could still do AS and, if you do well, you can do the full A Levels 1 year later. Knowledge-wise you'd already be halfway there I assume so you won't have wasted time.
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Ozzy's reply is great and not uncommon.
Quite a few people go down a difficult route in order to prove they are actually smart or for some other sort of self validation.
I can only commend people who try it and I did consider it for a while myself. I even had my heart set on it.

I suspect what happens 90% of the time though when people attempt this is they lose motivation halfway through or they become unstuck and have no support.

You seem smart. You know you could pass an access course and it should be free to you.
The easiest option isn't always the worst.

That being said if you wanted to do an Economics degree you'd probably have to do A-level maths alongside an access course.


Personally though I think your going down the hardest route possible which is potentially going to set yourself up for failure.
What usually happens after that is people get demotivated and they have to look for work. Then they get trapped in the work cycle and find it difficult to find a way back into education.
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Hi,

If I have understood correctly you are aiming for either classics or economics, ideally at Cambridge?

The first thing that any Cambridge interviewer for classics would ask is why you didn’t choose Latin, Greek or classics A levels to self study. They want to see evidence of real, not just stated, passion for their subject and saying you wanted to get As won’t cut it. If you think you can’t get As in essay based subjects at A level what makes you think that you’ll do well at Cambridge (or any other university for that matter) when both of your chosen subjects are heavily essay based?

What you are showing however is a tremendous capacity for hard work and the ability to motivate yourself to achieve, both of which are exceptional!
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Hi,

If I have understood correctly you are aiming for either classics or economics, ideally at Cambridge?

The first thing that any Cambridge interviewer for classics would ask is why you didn’t choose Latin, Greek or classics A levels to self study. They want to see evidence of real, not just stated, passion for their subject and saying you wanted to get As won’t cut it. If you think you can’t get As in essay based subjects at A level what makes you think that you’ll do well at Cambridge (or any other university for that matter) when both of your chosen subjects are heavily essay based?

What you are showing however is a tremendous capacity for hard work and the ability to motivate yourself to achieve, both of which are exceptional!
Those are all fair points. On taking Greek or Latin for an A-Level, the honest answer is that doing it on an accelerated track without support to keep me pointed in the right direction would make me a little bit uncomfortable. I have no problem telling an interviewer that, even if it makes me look like a weaker candidate I will answer truthfully.

The fact that I'm not taking a language as an A-Level doesn't mean that I am ignoring it all together though. I'm already starting on ancient Greek and would like to start on Latin too, but I have to carefully balance my workload and not take on too much because at the end of the day I can't do anything unless I get good exam results so that has to be the priority.

I've also been enjoying reading famous pieces of Classics literature for the first time, but this is also a little bit on the back burner due to exams being the primary focus. Admittedly, if I was applying for Economics it would be much harder for me to demonstrate interest, not that I am uninterested, but that I haven't applied myself in nearly the same way that I have with Classics.

I am confident that I can get an A in an essay based subject or I wouldn't be going down this road. Ultimately, I think you have to be confident you can achieve a high grade if you are even thinking about applying to Cambridge or another top university. I'm apprehensive and a little confused perhaps, but I feel that's natural in my position as someone who has never taken an A-Level before.
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(Original post by ozzyoscy)
After that I worked, and now I'm hopefully doing an Access course. I applied to a college and I'm having a routine English and Maths assessment, so hopefully that means I'm pretty much on it now. This course won't have exams, it'll just be short essays and coursework. I'll know by the end if I'm cut out for uni structure. If I flop at that, the only option left would be a foundation year. I'm not sure what else I would do.

Before the A Level reform, and given you were already considering doing it over 2 years, the best route in my view would've been doinging AS Level exams next summer to see how you do. I don't know if that's still an option now; I forgot they changed it so there's an exam after 2 years and AS is meaningless now. But maybe you could still do AS and, if you do well, you can do the full A Levels 1 year later. Knowledge-wise you'd already be halfway there I assume so you won't have wasted time.
Just keep at it, I am glad to hear that it is all still on track. I think weaker men would have given up after the disappointment of devoting so much into taking their exams again as an adult with responsibilities and then falling short. I'm not a big fan of the idea to do the AS exams though, I think it is better to press on full steam ahead. If things look bad, I can give myself an additional year in January.

(Original post by adam271)
Ozzy's reply is great and not uncommon.
Quite a few people go down a difficult route in order to prove they are actually smart or for some other sort of self validation.
I can only commend people who try it and I did consider it for a while myself. I even had my heart set on it.

I suspect what happens 90% of the time though when people attempt this is they lose motivation halfway through or they become unstuck and have no support.

You seem smart. You know you could pass an access course and it should be free to you.
The easiest option isn't always the worst.

That being said if you wanted to do an Economics degree you'd probably have to do A-level maths alongside an access course.


Personally though I think your going down the hardest route possible which is potentially going to set yourself up for failure.
What usually happens after that is people get demotivated and they have to look for work. Then they get trapped in the work cycle and find it difficult to find a way back into education.
You're right, I suspect a lot of adults can get demotivated due to work and other external responsibilities leading to them losing focus. I'm in a quite fortunate position though, I am on stable enough ground that I can afford to switch to part-time work, so I won't have too much pressure on that side of things. Doing education while working full time ain't for the faint hearted, not for me anyway!

The access route is attractive to some extent, but access courses in Scotland differ from their English counterparts. I just don't think that they would prepare me adequately enough for the universities that I am aiming towards. I'm motivated enough that I can hit the grades I need, I know that in my heart of hearts.

+One of the posts that I made in this thread not long after I created it still hasn't been approved. It might randomly show up, but it was wrote before most people responded.
Last edited by rfg22; 2 months ago
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IrisM65
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I just don't think that they would prepare me adequately enough for the universities that I am aiming towards.

My experience of teaching on these supports your conclusion. It is also the case that self teaching as you are doing is far more impressive. The only drawback is the lack of advice and objective assessment of where you are at. The subjects that you are taking minimise the risk of fooling yourself with their prescribed mark schemes though.

What you are saying about reading and studying classics, Latin and Greek is also impressive and would highlight your application as a good one.

My experience tells me that once you have learned the material the best approach is past papers, past papers and past papers all timed of course. If you run out of questions, what I do is look for similar questions on other boards’ papers.

Good luck!
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