Should I drop out of second year of A levels?

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Anonymous #1
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Because of the extent of my health issues and not being able to get support/mitigating circumstances and struggling in class/possibly causing failure in class, I feel like I should drop out of second year of A levels. I should have dropped out after the first year but I chose not to because I surprised myself. Should I drop out of second year in February (when I turn 18) and get a full time job?
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Anonymous #2
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Don't drop out

Just get through a levels and then take a gap year
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Because of the extent of my health issues and not being able to get support/mitigating circumstances and struggling in class/possibly causing failure in class, I feel like I should drop out of second year of A levels. I should have dropped out after the first year but I chose not to because I surprised myself. Should I drop out of second year in February (when I turn 18) and get a full time job?
Why can't you get support? Have you spoken to your school?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Blue_Cow)
Why can't you get support? Have you spoken to your school?
Yes and I need a referral from the gp to The hospital to get support for exams but I can’t get it because my gp are ********s and they say for me not to do it and just sit there, but I know that’s not allowed. Only other option is to leave and get a job, or leave and do nothing with my life and go on benefits because of how bad it is.
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SkyRunner61
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If your health issues are such that continuing to go to school might not be possible, would it really be feasible to work a full-time job?
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Joe Frazier
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Because of the extent of my health issues and not being able to get support/mitigating circumstances and struggling in class/possibly causing failure in class, I feel like I should drop out of second year of A levels. I should have dropped out after the first year but I chose not to because I surprised myself. Should I drop out of second year in February (when I turn 18) and get a full time job?
You might surprise yourself again. There is no disadvantage of finishing A Levels, they’re free and you’ve already studied them for 18 months, you may as well finish.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SkyRunner61)
If your health issues are such that continuing to go to school might not be possible, would it really be feasible to work a full-time job?
Not really but what am I supposed to do? You have to do something with your life, can’t just sit at home and do nothing.

At least with a full time job you don’t need to do work outside/revision and stress about exams. I am so scared that I am beginning to spot (I have never spotted before), I thought I started my period but I didn’t. I feel like my heart palpitations caused me to spot, I can also hear it when I am trying to sleep and feel like I am getting a fever. My genetic condition also causes heart defects, so heart palpitations every day on a regular basis is not good. Only way to stop all this anxiety is to drop out and forget studies. I am sure work life isn’t this stressful and won’t be that hard, unless it requires using my brain.
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Allyxluv
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I'm sorry to hear about your health issues, as a 2nd-year a-level student I want to encourage you to complete your a-levels, even if you feel as if you're going to fail so that you can get some sort of qualification and put yourself in a better position. Have you considered looking at apprenticeships? They may pay the same as a lower-wage job with some going up to 20k a year. This way maybe you can get some qualifications too,You should really schedule a meeting with your school headteacher about your health concerns if they are not supporting you....try and get them in trouble, I don't know email the goddamn government, the kids at my school usually complete some type of risk assessment and then they can miss more lessons. Figure something out, dont give up x.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Joe Frazier)
You might surprise yourself again. There is no disadvantage of finishing A Levels, they’re free and you’ve already studied them for 18 months, you may as well finish.
Disadvantage is failure, as in a U grade.


I doubt I will surprise myself again because of how hard A2 is compared to AS. I feel like I only passed AS because I was well at the beginning of the AS year so even though I got sick mid way through the year and began forgetting nearly everything, I was still okay. If I was sick from the first day to the last of AS then I wouldn’t have learnt anything and then failed everything.
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SkyRunner61
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Not really but what am I supposed to do? You have to do something with your life, can’t just sit at home and do nothing.

At least with a full time job you don’t need to do work outside/revision and stress about exams. I am so scared that I am beginning to spot (I have never spotted before), I thought I started my period but I didn’t. I feel like my heart palpitations caused me to spot, I can also hear it when I am trying to sleep and feel like I am getting a fever. My genetic condition also causes heart defects, so heart palpitations every day on a regular basis is not good. Only way to stop all this anxiety is to drop out and forget studies. I am sure work life isn’t this stressful and won’t be that hard, unless it requires using my brain.
From my experience at least, work is difficult in a different way. I was sick during sixth form but I always enjoyed learning so despite the stress of A Levels it felt like I was working towards something worthwhile. Currently on a gap year before going to uni to recover and I’m working a full time job, which can be very stressful and places more strain on my body than my studies did. Even for jobs that don’t require that much brainwork, work isn’t easy
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Allyxluv)
I'm sorry to hear about your health issues, as a 2nd-year a-level student I want to encourage you to complete your a-levels, even if you feel as if you're going to fail so that you can get some sort of qualification and put yourself in a better position. Have you considered looking at apprenticeships? They may pay the same as a lower-wage job with some going up to 20k a year. This way maybe you can get some qualifications too,You should really schedule a meeting with your school headteacher about your health concerns if they are not supporting you....try and get them in trouble, I don't know email the goddamn government, the kids at my school usually complete some type of risk assessment and then they can miss more lessons. Figure something out, dont give up x.
So what are you suggesting? I drop out and do an apprenticeship?

Apparently jobs look at experience not qualifications. Realistically I may not go to university because of the amount of health issues I have, so there may not be a point to completing A levels. People are completing ucas applications, and I am there wondering if I am even going to go.
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