What’s with NSL on dodgy country roads.

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FRS500
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I’m no stranger to the single track road round my neck of the woods.

They’re clearly dangerous roads at too high a speed, ones where I would just about go 20 mph let alone 30... woe be tide 60. Id end up flying into someone’s electric fence or simply into the front of someone’s car coming round a corner.

Tried to figure it out, particularly if (now that I’m adding car as well as motorbike to my bow) I end up being taken down a single track in my test.

Why are they marked NSL (60 mph) when the council could just as easily set a sensible limit.

Also in a driving test, just what IS too fast/slow on a single track road? Where’s the line between failing for going too fast and failing for being unacceptably slow? Given the dodgy surface and bends all over the gaffe.
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Jang Gwangnam
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(Original post by FRS500)
I’m no stranger to the single track road round my neck of the woods.

They’re clearly dangerous roads at too high a speed, ones where I would just about go 20 mph let alone 30... woe be tide 60. Id end up flying into someone’s electric fence or simply into the front of someone’s car coming round a corner.

Tried to figure it out, particularly if (now that I’m adding car as well as motorbike to my bow) I end up being taken down a single track in my test.

Why are they marked NSL (60 mph) when the council could just as easily set a sensible limit.

Also in a driving test, just what IS too fast/slow on a single track road? Where’s the line between failing for going too fast and failing for being unacceptably slow? Given the dodgy surface and bends all over the gaffe.
Lol you can go whatever speeds on the back roads (irrespective of the speed sign as these roads aren't properly enforced), personally I like to peg it and test my cornering and my car's raw acceleration. It's a blast if you know what you're doing.

On the test, just go the speed limit - whether that be a sign that says NSL or no signs therefore meaning you have to stick to 30mph (unless stated otherwise by repeater signs).
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Arkansas
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(Original post by FRS500)
I’m no stranger to the single track road round my neck of the woods.

They’re clearly dangerous roads at too high a speed, ones where I would just about go 20 mph let alone 30... woe be tide 60. Id end up flying into someone’s electric fence or simply into the front of someone’s car coming round a corner.

Tried to figure it out, particularly if (now that I’m adding car as well as motorbike to my bow) I end up being taken down a single track in my test.

Why are they marked NSL (60 mph) when the council could just as easily set a sensible limit.

Also in a driving test, just what IS too fast/slow on a single track road? Where’s the line between failing for going too fast and failing for being unacceptably slow? Given the dodgy surface and bends all over the gaffe.
It's an ABSOLUTE limit, even if it's not physically possible. I've had NSL for literally 100 yards before. It is not a goal. If a speed is encouraged, a green (non-prohibitive circle) will be around it. It's not being changed because it's legally defined as a single carriageway. I doubt the council has the resources to plug every single dodgy lane when it assumes driver sense will take priority.

Driving with due care and attention comes BEFORE the national speed limit, or any speed limit for that matter.
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StriderHort
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My guess if the council want to keep slapping 30's and 40's around, often as a result of lobbying, then they need to take more active responsibility for it. They don't want to, past a point you need to just allow people to drive.

On a twisty backroad, if i'm not going to read/act on the huge black and white chevrons warning me of the bend, or the huge SLOW painted on the road or even common sense... then a wee number in a circle won't help much.
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IWMTom
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Why not NSL? Just because you're not comfortable driving at that speed doesn't mean others aren't.
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Dee-Emma
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(Original post by FRS500)
I’m no stranger to the single track road round my neck of the woods.

They’re clearly dangerous roads at too high a speed, ones where I would just about go 20 mph let alone 30... woe be tide 60. Id end up flying into someone’s electric fence or simply into the front of someone’s car coming round a corner.

Tried to figure it out, particularly if (now that I’m adding car as well as motorbike to my bow) I end up being taken down a single track in my test.

Why are they marked NSL (60 mph) when the council could just as easily set a sensible limit.

Also in a driving test, just what IS too fast/slow on a single track road? Where’s the line between failing for going too fast and failing for being unacceptably slow? Given the dodgy surface and bends all over the gaffe.
It's a case of skill and knowledge. Imagine there's a tractor / horse / deer / pedestrian etc around the next blind bend. Could you stop in time. Equally if its raining, or maybe un-gritted black ice, or just loose surface... Can you take that next corner, or even slow down. Not everything in life needs regulating, use your common sense.
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FRS500
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(Original post by IWMTom)
Why not NSL? Just because you're not comfortable driving at that speed doesn't mean others aren't.
Because there’s absolutely no way you can do 60 on a road that’s tighter than a gnat’s a’hole and bends every couple of feet with a road surface that’s tougher than Keith Lemon on a Friday night after a couple VK’s!

It would be physically impossible to do that kind of speed without causing an accident round here tbh
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FRS500
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(Original post by StriderHort)
On a twisty backroad, if i'm not going to read/act on the huge black and white chevrons warning me of the bend, or the huge SLOW painted on the road or even common sense... then a wee number in a circle won't help much.
This is a very good way of looking at it tbh!
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Drewski
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It's a limit, not a target.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by FRS500)
Because there’s absolutely no way you can do 60 on a road that’s tighter than a gnat’s a’hole and bends every couple of feet with a road surface that’s tougher than Keith Lemon on a Friday night after a couple VK’s!

It would be physically impossible to do that kind of speed without causing an accident round here tbh
Okay? So don't do 60? Why exactly does the speed limit need to change though?
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the beer
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(Original post by FRS500)
the council could just as easily set a sensible limit.
No chance, we'd just end up with a blanket 40 limit.
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TheMcSame
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NSL for those kinds of roads are mainly just less hassle and maintenance I believe. You might have stretches where 60 is all good, then somewhere even 30 is too much. Why maintain two or three extra signs (or pairs of signs) when you can just have the NSL signs cover the whole thing. Okay, so why not just blanket the road with a lower limit? Same again really. Is it worth the hassle and cost for a quiet road? Probably not.

To add to that, these roads aren't usually as high traffic, just making the change less justifiable. It'd make sense on some more frequently used country roads. For example, I have a few near me which are pretty solid roads, well used and NSL+ can be done quite easily on some stretches. But when we're talking single track kinda stuff? It's hard to justify spending the money on new signs and maintaining them. Even less so if people are 'policing' themselves because those speeds just aren't safe on that road.

Simply put, this is basically one of those scenarios where the limit is just that. An absolute limit.

As for what is too fast/slow. It's a tough one and depends on a road-by-road basis, that's before you throw in different scenarios. All I can say to that is use your best judgement. As long as you're in full control of the vehicle and within the speed limit, it'd be hard to get slapped for going too fast.
Last edited by TheMcSame; 1 month ago
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roo02
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(Original post by FRS500)
Because there’s absolutely no way you can do 60 on a road that’s tighter than a gnat’s a’hole and bends every couple of feet with a road surface that’s tougher than Keith Lemon on a Friday night after a couple VK’s!

It would be physically impossible to do that kind of speed without causing an accident round here tbh
I think a lot of people are misunderstanding what we mean by backroad here; I live on one and the fastest I've probably ever gone is 40, and that was at night on the only straight; the bends have to be taken at 20 max.

I think the council set that limit because they can, it's legally a single carriageway, even if it is single track, and nobody is stupid enough to go that fast
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by roo02)
I think a lot of people are misunderstanding what we mean by backroad here; I live on one and the fastest I've probably ever gone is 40, and that was at night on the only straight; the bends have to be taken at 20 max.
I think it's just the difference of what words can mean to people. For example, backroad to me would be more like quiet residential sidestreets, generally littered with cars on the side of the road.

Likewise, the OP mentions both country roads and single track roads. I'd say the later is almost always the former, but the former isn't always the later. To me, a country road is just a two lane connecting road that cuts through the countryside (so not something like dual carriageway), non/minimal residential, most likely unlit roads, may or may not have road markings or only minimal markings.
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roo02
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(Original post by TheMcSame)
I think it's just the difference of what words can mean to people. For example, backroad to me would be more like quiet residential sidestreets, generally littered with cars on the side of the road.

Likewise, the OP mentions both country roads and single track roads. I'd say the later is almost always the former, but the former isn't always the later. To me, a country road is just a two lane connecting road that cuts through the countryside (so not something like dual carriageway), non/minimal residential, most likely unlit roads, may or may not have road markings or only minimal markings.
oh fair enough! I never considered backroad could mean anything except a single track 'ratrun' in all honesty. thank you!
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