Golfs and Polo’s why are they so special?

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M1llionz
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Like I saw and 08 golf going for 3 grand and millage was 90k... this is uncommon either. I think Polo’s usually abit cheaper.

What makes these cars so great?
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StriderHort
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Both have a reputation as near bulletproof drivers cars, price doesn't sound particularly uncommon to me, people still want them so it's supply and demand.
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Medkid7
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Pools and golfs are some of the safest cars you can get, and insurance is reasonable (although there are other cars with cheaper options). Personally I feel like the golf model looks much better as the years have gone by, so aesthetics could be a factor for popularity
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IWMTom
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(Original post by M1llionz)
Like I saw and 08 golf going for 3 grand and millage was 90k... this is uncommon either. I think Polo’s usually abit cheaper.

What makes these cars so great?
On the whole well built cars.
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barnetlad
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The 'if only everything was as reliable as a Volkswagen' is true, at least in my family's experience when I was growing up.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by barnetlad)
The 'if only everything was as reliable as a Volkswagen' is true, at least in my family's experience when I was growing up.
"If only everything was as efficiently organised as a Mercedes"...nah I don't see that catching on
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FRS500
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- Cheap insurance;

- Well built and reliable German vehicle;

- Parts are easy to find. OEM or otherwise;

- Likewise, it's a common vehicle so if you want to tinker around with it and service yourself you'll find yourself able to get advice and instructions with no drama at all.
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noturhabibti
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polos are lenggg
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PTMalewski
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Guys! These cars were actually famous among mechanics for excessive engine oil consuption, prematurely failing timing chains and even engine blocks literally exploding their pieces!

The 08 Golf is already the sixth gen Golf, that mainly used TSI and 2.0 TDI engines. Both of them were one of the most unreliable engines on the market at that time.

The reasons why these cars are rather expensive for their age, is that they were expensive once they were knew, and most people have no idea about cars, and follow stereotypes that at best were true in the 90ies. They are overall well built maybe, but their engines had some fatal design flaws, like faulty oil control rings, oil-pressure controlled timing chain tensioners that don't work properly when the car is city driven, or in case of 2.0 TDI, early units had engine blocks so thin, they would crack apart, especially when poorly designed oil pumps failed to lubricate the engine.
My cousin could have actually been killed, when he was overtaking and a 2.0 TDI that didn't do even 70 k miles, exploded during the manuver. Not only he lost all power during the manuver, the brakes power assist went out too. Barely managed to decelarate in time. He had to call firefighters to clean the road because it was all covered with engine oil and pieces of metal from the blown engine.

The last good Golf was IVth gen, maybe VIth gen given it's a naturally-aspirated version.
Last edited by PTMalewski; 1 month ago
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Nuffles
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(Original post by PTMalewski)
Guys! These cars were actually famous among mechanics for excessive engine oil consuption, prematurely failing timing chains and even engine blocks literally exploding their pieces!

The 08 Golf is already the sixth gen Golf, that mainly used TSI and 2.0 TDI engines. Both of them were one of the most unreliable engines on the market at that time.

The reasons why these cars are rather expensive for their age, is that they were expensive once they were knew, and most people have no idea about cars, and follow stereotypes that at best were true in the 90ies. They are overall well built maybe, but their engines had some fatal design flaws, like faulty oil control rings, oil-pressure controlled timing chain tensioners that don't work properly when the car is city driven, or in case of 2.0 TDI, early units had engine blocks so thin, they would crack apart, especially when poorly designed oil pumps failed to lubricate the engine.
My cousin could have actually been killed, when he was overtaking and a 2.0 TDI that didn't do even 70 k miles, exploded during the manuver. Not only he lost all power during the manuver, the brakes power assist went out too. Barely managed to decelarate in time. He had to call firefighters to clean the road because it was all covered with engine oil and pieces of metal from the blown engine.

The last good Golf was IVth gen, maybe VIth gen given it's a naturally-aspirated version.
The 2.0PD TDIs weren't great engines, but the 2.0CR TDIs are known as *very* good engines. The 1.6CR TDIs are pretty good as well. The older 1.9PD TDIs are on the whole very good engines as well as long as they're serviced on time with the correct oil. The even older 1.9VE TDIs are damn near bullet proof. There are taxis all over Europe with VAG diesels in them clocking up anywhere between 200 and 300,000 miles.

I've owned a 1.9VE with 160k on it, and 1.9PDs with 100k and 185k - currently own a 1.9PD with 160k miles on it - they all run/ran like sewing machines. My girlfriend has a 1.9VE TDI as well with 165k on it and it runs great.

The cars have their problems, but all cars do. Parts are cheap and very easy to source, and they're reasonably easy to work on. There's a massive wealth of information online in the way of forums and YouTube videos covering pretty much any problem you can have with them and how to fix it. And then you get interiors which are generally way ahead of cars of a similar class (sit in a mk1 Focus and then sit in a mk4 Golf - the Golf is leagues ahead) and cars which drive really well in general. Smooth, comfortable, settled and composed at high speed.
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PTMalewski
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(Original post by Nuffles)
The 2.0PD TDIs weren't great engines, but the 2.0CR TDIs are known as *very* good engines.
That's right, the 2.0TDI were blowing up already when they were on varranty, at less than 60, even 30k miles, so VW improved them.

(Original post by Nuffles)
The older 1.9PD TDIs are on the whole very good engines as well as long as they're serviced on time with the correct oil. The even older 1.9VE TDIs are damn near bullet proof. There are taxis all over Europe with VAG diesels in them clocking up anywhere between 200 and 300,000 miles.
Especially the older 1.9TDIs were good. The final BXE version has some savings and bad modifications, in Poland garages specialised in swapping 1.9 TDI BXE VAGs with older engines, because repairing the BXEs was too expensive and they were flawed anyway.

(Original post by Nuffles)
I've owned a 1.9VE with 160k on it, and 1.9PDs with 100k and 185k - currently own a 1.9PD with 160k miles on it - they all run/ran like sewing machines. My girlfriend has a 1.9VE TDI as well with 165k on it and it runs great.
I know people who owned cars with Rover K16- a nail to a coffin for Rover, and modified Fiat 115c push rod engine from the fifites, that did 170 to 300k miles without renovation, and especially the 115c weren't even consuming more than 0,2liter of engine oil per 600 miles. It's really not an chievement, it's a disgrace that modern engines often require complete rebuilt or replacement at mileage an over 60 years old engine can do without. And 115c wasn't a durable engine, it was pretty powerful for a small push-rod produced at that time and had only three crank bearings, so it was one of the shorter lifespan engines, particularly vulnerable to driver's mistakes.

(Original post by Nuffles)
The cars have their problems, but all cars do. Parts are cheap and very easy to source, and they're reasonably easy to work on. There's a massive wealth of information online in the way of forums and YouTube videos covering pretty much any problem you can have with them and how to fix it.
This could be said of practically any car on the market. The difference is, that Japanese cars to an all around quality (except rusting Mazdas), add quality engines, while Fiats or Alfas might have some minor issues, parcularly electrical, which are easy and cheap to repair, cost far less, and have bulletprof engines. Look through the internet, ask on forums, the T-Jet is a much more reliable engine than VW 1.4 TSI, while delivering similar power.
And it's better to have some minor electrical issue, than a blown engine. Especially if it's not just HGF, but damaged oil control rings, valves crashed into pistons after premature chain failure, or a huge whole in the engine block.
Last edited by PTMalewski; 1 month ago
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LTEcactus
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Modern VWs are very cheap and nasty once you get underneath them. Heard they have an awful plastic water pump that fails in no time at all, dodgy timing chains etc. The interior plastics are literally their only redeeming feature.
Despite having an awful image, I think Vauxhall Corsa's are better built, but still not great.

If you want reliability and good build quality, Japanese cars are what you want, especially Toyota's and Honda's.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by LTEcactus)
Modern VWs are very cheap and nasty once you get underneath them. Heard they have an awful plastic water pump that fails in no time at all, dodgy timing chains etc. The interior plastics are literally their only redeeming feature.
Despite having an awful image, I think Vauxhall Corsa's are better built, but still not great.
Absolute nonsense.
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roo02
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(Original post by M1llionz)
Like I saw and 08 golf going for 3 grand and millage was 90k... this is uncommon either. I think Polo’s usually abit cheaper.

What makes these cars so great?
If we're taking about older golfs, eg </=mk4 then its because:

Their engines are bulletproof, people joke that they're barely broken in at 150k;
Tonnes and tonnes of modifications available for every part, bodykits etc;
On a similar note, parts are plentiful, since they can also be taken from other brands and models, Lupo has the same throttle actuator as a seat arousa for example. mk4 seats can be taken from most audis, etc.
Can be remapped like hell: My friend has a bora and he's got it from its stock 160ish bhp to about 270 just by remapping and installing a bigger turbo.
They're easy to work on, so are brilliant for people wanting to get into modifying cars
They're safe
And they transcend class: A golf is one of those cars than anybody can own regardless of societal status.
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username5395306
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if it aint jap its scarp..... i guessits just hype but newer ones arent the same
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username5395306
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(Original post by roo02)
If we're taking about older golfs, eg </=mk4 then its because:

Their engines are bulletproof, people joke that they're barely broken in at 150k;
Tonnes and tonnes of modifications available for every part, bodykits etc;
On a similar note, parts are plentiful, since they can also be taken from other brands and models, Lupo has the same throttle actuator as a seat arousa for example. mk4 seats can be taken from most audis, etc.
Can be remapped like hell: My friend has a bora and he's got it from its stock 160ish bhp to about 270 just by remapping and installing a bigger turbo.
They're easy to work on, so are brilliant for people wanting to get into modifying cars
They're safe
And they transcend class: A golf is one of those cars than anybody can own regardless of societal status.
i dont think transverse engine layouts are that easy to work on...
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alex282
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I suppose cause it's just an average car but personally I hate them
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Nuffles
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(Original post by 7xm2)
i dont think transverse engine layouts are that easy to work on...
VAG stuff is built with the "service position" in mind. The radiator support is very easy to either slide forward or remove completely. Takes 20 minutes or so once you've done it a few times.

I used the design to my advantage when I replaced the shift solenoids on my mk4. Bumper, headlights, crash bar, and rad support removed with the rad supported (to save me dumping the coolant) gave me an extra five or six inches of clearance.

Image

The front gearbox cover is right up against the fan shroud if you don't pull the rad forwards - loads of room if you do though

Image

Like most procedures with VAG cars, if you know how to do it properly it's not that bad. If I could've been bothered to drop the coolant then I'd have had completely open access to the front of the engine and gearbox.
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PTMalewski
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(Original post by Nuffles)
VAG stuff is built with the "service position" in mind. The radiator support is very easy to either slide forward or remove completely. Takes 20 minutes or so once you've done it a few times.

I used the design to my advantage when I replaced the shift solenoids on my mk4. Bumper, headlights, crash bar, and rad support removed with the rad supported (to save me dumping the coolant) gave me an extra five or six inches of clearance.

Image

The front gearbox cover is right up against the fan shroud if you don't pull the rad forwards - loads of room if you do though

Image

Like most procedures with VAG cars, if you know how to do it properly it's not that bad. If I could've been bothered to drop the coolant then I'd have had completely open access to the front of the engine and gearbox.
JESUS CHRIST!!! You've dismantled whole front, and you call that an easy service position?! And it looks like it's Golf MkIV!!!

In a properly designed car from that time, you have excellent acess to do anything in the engine bay without dismantling the bodyshell, and removing a radiator should be 5 minutes of work for someone who has no idea about repairs whatsoever!
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BlueIndigoViolet
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Deutsches Ingenieurwesen hat einen wirklich guten Ruf, für den die Leute bereit sind zu bezahlen.
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