Anonymous_234129
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Hi I am thinking between choosing between these two
Now I have thought about working possibly on planes and aircraft and learning the theory behind it. I have one career in mind which is being a aerospace engineer.

But I am also thinking about doing electrical and electronic because I really like coding and programming. Software engineering is another career in mind that I want to do.
Note: I cant do computer science otherwise I would have to apply next year which I cant

Now I have thought about maybe working on electrical engineering projects like sensors, robots but I also would love to work on projects that are aerospace related like drones or rockets or anything that flies.


What do you think I should do?
Any suggestions?
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mnot
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If you want to work "on" i.e. onboard planes you really need to be a technician or field type engineer.

If you just want to design & develop things around these then you can work on aircraft with an aerospace or electrical degree. Aircraft employ lots of complex avionics and on board computers & electrical systems.

The aerospace degree will focus more broadly on: aerodynamics, materials, structures/stress/dynamics, propulsion systems, thermodynamics (basically all the mechanical aspects of aircraft) as well as avionics and electrical systems.

But power electrical engineering will be much more focused, id imagine more depth on programming, power electronics, electrical systems... but to a greater range of applications.

its really a case of preference, what aspect of aircraft are you more drawn to.
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Anonymous_234129
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(Original post by mnot)
If you want to work "on" i.e. onboard planes you really need to be a technician or field type engineer.

If you just want to design & develop things around these then you can work on aircraft with an aerospace or electrical degree. Aircraft employ lots of complex avionics and on board computers & electrical systems.

The aerospace degree will focus more broadly on: aerodynamics, materials, structures/stress/dynamics, propulsion systems, thermodynamics (basically all the mechanical aspects of aircraft) as well as avionics and electrical systems.

But power electrical engineering will be much more focused, id imagine more depth on programming, power electronics, electrical systems... but to a greater range of applications.

its really a case of preference, what aspect of aircraft are you more drawn to.
Maybe any aspect of aircraft so maybe thermodynamics, propulsion of rockets or maybe even the software of aircrafts that involves coding or programming.
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous_234129)
Maybe any aspect of aircraft so maybe thermodynamics, propulsion of rockets or maybe even the software of aircrafts that involves coding or programming.
If you want to keep the ability to do electrical systems & thermodynamics you are better off doing aerospace.
Electrical engineering wouldn't give you the broader mechanical aspects of the aerospace industry.
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Anonymous_234129
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(Original post by mnot)
If you want to keep the ability to do electrical systems & thermodynamics you are better off doing aerospace.
Electrical engineering wouldn't give you the broader mechanical aspects of the aerospace industry.
what if I like coding and programming should I go with electrical and electronic engineering or stick with aerospace?
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous_234129)
what if I like coding and programming should I go with electrical and electronic engineering or stick with aerospace?
Yea probably electrical & electronic or computer science
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Anonymous_234129
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(Original post by mnot)
Yea probably electrical & electronic or computer science
Y is that? is it because electrical and electronic engineering exposes students to a lot of coding?
What other things do they do because what if I don't like the other aspects of that course?
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mnot
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(Original post by Anonymous_234129)
Y is that? is it because electrical and electronic engineering exposes students to a lot of coding?
What other things do they do because what if I don't like the other aspects of that course?
Look at all the courses, aerospace won’t expose you to lots of coding. You’ll be more likely to look at computational engineering like cfd or fea. If you want to look at programming/coding aerospace isn’t the best degree.
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Smack
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Aerospace if you want to work on the physical or mechanical parts of the plane, electrical and electronics if you want to do the electrical part and maybe some software parts.
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uberteknik
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I did a degree in electronics, landed a job at British Aerospace and later a company sponsored masters in advanced aerospace systems engineering.

Started out as a graduate engineer and through promotions ended up as Senior Principal in electronics design before progressing to project management.

Aerospace engineering keeps options open as a general degree. You are unlikely to end up in a design role with this route as it covers the subject in breadth but not depth and more suited to systems, test, field test etc.

Electronics is already more specialised, has less breadth but greater depth. It's also better for casting your general job net wider as more diverse applications open up in different industries.

Both degrees are general in their application and if you want to end up in a design role, ever more specialisation and narrowing of options becomes apparent.

General systems engineers tend to be boys , beers and ultra competitive types. Specialised Designers tend to be ultra focussed geek types. Both define themselves through work.

Once in your career, it's far easier to jump from specialist to general systems but not from systems to specialist design.
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