Qualifications in coding, law or finance

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BenjaminSibson
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Hello, so with A levels being cancelled and all that I have way too much spare time. I've learned a fair bit about coding, particularly data science, because it's relevant to what I want to study at uni (finance).

I'm interested in learning about fintech, law, finance and coding. Learned a little bit about all of them, though they're obviously incredibly broad topics, I find it all interesting.

I'm curious if there's any respected qualifications I can start working towards in these areas?
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MindMax2000
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The jobs in the finance sector is varied, and there are many finance and professional qualifications that you could easily do that could be sufficient for you to get the job.

Finance at university will have little coding, law, or tech (if any). A lot of it would be learning about financial accounting, financial analysis, basic economics, financial mathematics, and the types of financial investments there are. If you intend to do something mathematical or require a bit of IT after uni, the finance degree alone might not be enough.

If you intend to work in fintech, you're better off specialising in a qualification on programming and cybersecurity. Blockchain is a big thing at the moment.

If you want to specialise in law, then you're better off doing an LLB or LLM, specialising in corporate law

If you want to learn coding, then there's no specific legal requirement that you need a qualification to code, but you could just easily do a computer science degree. The only qualifications that I think are credible in terms of being comprehensive and in what they teach would be those issued by the bodies that created the programming languages. As far as I know, Python (https://pythoninstitute.org/certification/) and Java (https://education.oracle.com/java-ce...ation-benefits) are the only ones. Having said that, most employers that employ coders usually just care about you being able to do the job than what qualifications you have.

If you're looking for a job that combines as many of the above interests as possible, then I'd consider:

  • quants - combines financial trading and coding - really hard because of the maths
  • corporate finance - combines finance and law
  • blockchain and cybersecurity - mostly computing in the finance space

If you want to go into quants, consider the CQF qualification (https://www.cqf.com/about-cqf/progra...-qualification). As you will notice, you won't need a degree to do this qualification, but it can be expensive. It's also a highly prized qualification in quants, but it takes a lot of time to learn (i would argue as much time as a degree).

For corporate finance, employers can ask for a CFA (you can go into this after your degree: https://www.cfainstitute.org/en/programs/cfa), CISI certificate (https://www.cisi.org/cisiweb2/cisi-w...porate-finance), and the corporate finance qualification (https://www.icaew.com/learning-and-d...fqualification). The last qualification is new, so I haven't looked into it as such. You can alternatively do accounting qualifications to go into corproate finance as well. Which qualification is most suited can depend on the employer, bu the CFA is a safe bet.


There isn't a specific qualification that I could think of for blockchain, most likely because it's not fully regulated or established yet.

I think the first step is get better clarity on what you actually want to do.
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BenjaminSibson
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
The jobs in the finance sector is varied, and there are many finance and professional qualifications that you could easily do that could be sufficient for you to get the job.

Finance at university will have little coding, law, or tech (if any). A lot of it would be learning about financial accounting, financial analysis, basic economics, financial mathematics, and the types of financial investments there are. If you intend to do something mathematical or require a bit of IT after uni, the finance degree alone might not be enough.

If you intend to work in fintech, you're better off specialising in a qualification on programming and cybersecurity. Blockchain is a big thing at the moment.

If you want to specialise in law, then you're better off doing an LLB or LLM, specialising in corporate law

If you want to learn coding, then there's no specific legal requirement that you need a qualification to code, but you could just easily do a computer science degree. The only qualifications that I think are credible in terms of being comprehensive and in what they teach would be those issued by the bodies that created the programming languages. As far as I know, Python (https://pythoninstitute.org/certification/) and Java (https://education.oracle.com/java-ce...ation-benefits) are the only ones. Having said that, most employers that employ coders usually just care about you being able to do the job than what qualifications you have.

If you're looking for a job that combines as many of the above interests as possible, then I'd consider:

  • quants - combines financial trading and coding - really hard because of the maths
  • corporate finance - combines finance and law
  • blockchain and cybersecurity - mostly computing in the finance space

If you want to go into quants, consider the CQF qualification (https://www.cqf.com/about-cqf/progra...-qualification). As you will notice, you won't need a degree to do this qualification, but it can be expensive. It's also a highly prized qualification in quants, but it takes a lot of time to learn (i would argue as much time as a degree).

For corporate finance, employers can ask for a CFA (you can go into this after your degree: https://www.cfainstitute.org/en/programs/cfa), CISI certificate (https://www.cisi.org/cisiweb2/cisi-w...porate-finance), and the corporate finance qualification (https://www.icaew.com/learning-and-d...fqualification). The last qualification is new, so I haven't looked into it as such. You can alternatively do accounting qualifications to go into corproate finance as well. Which qualification is most suited can depend on the employer, bu the CFA is a safe bet.


There isn't a specific qualification that I could think of for blockchain, most likely because it's not fully regulated or established yet.

I think the first step is get better clarity on what you actually want to do.
Thank you for the detail, I'm pretty set on corporate finance as a career but I'd like to know a bit about other stuff so I can keep my options open, I don't think I have the experience nor the knowledge to set my heart on one yet. I've took one exam in the certificate level of CFQ, but the next one is regulation and I don't really want to do that until I'm in the industry, unless I have a regulation module in my uni degree maybe?

I reckon those coding qualifications might be useful to pursue for now, so thank you for that, I'll take a look now.
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BenjaminSibson
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
The jobs in the finance sector is varied, and there are many finance and professional qualifications that you could easily do that could be sufficient for you to get the job.

Finance at university will have little coding, law, or tech (if any). A lot of it would be learning about financial accounting, financial analysis, basic economics, financial mathematics, and the types of financial investments there are. If you intend to do something mathematical or require a bit of IT after uni, the finance degree alone might not be enough.

If you intend to work in fintech, you're better off specialising in a qualification on programming and cybersecurity. Blockchain is a big thing at the moment.

If you want to specialise in law, then you're better off doing an LLB or LLM, specialising in corporate law

If you want to learn coding, then there's no specific legal requirement that you need a qualification to code, but you could just easily do a computer science degree. The only qualifications that I think are credible in terms of being comprehensive and in what they teach would be those issued by the bodies that created the programming languages. As far as I know, Python (https://pythoninstitute.org/certification/) and Java (https://education.oracle.com/java-ce...ation-benefits) are the only ones. Having said that, most employers that employ coders usually just care about you being able to do the job than what qualifications you have.

If you're looking for a job that combines as many of the above interests as possible, then I'd consider:

  • quants - combines financial trading and coding - really hard because of the maths
  • corporate finance - combines finance and law
  • blockchain and cybersecurity - mostly computing in the finance space

If you want to go into quants, consider the CQF qualification (https://www.cqf.com/about-cqf/progra...-qualification). As you will notice, you won't need a degree to do this qualification, but it can be expensive. It's also a highly prized qualification in quants, but it takes a lot of time to learn (i would argue as much time as a degree).

For corporate finance, employers can ask for a CFA (you can go into this after your degree: https://www.cfainstitute.org/en/programs/cfa), CISI certificate (https://www.cisi.org/cisiweb2/cisi-w...porate-finance), and the corporate finance qualification (https://www.icaew.com/learning-and-d...fqualification). The last qualification is new, so I haven't looked into it as such. You can alternatively do accounting qualifications to go into corproate finance as well. Which qualification is most suited can depend on the employer, bu the CFA is a safe bet.


There isn't a specific qualification that I could think of for blockchain, most likely because it's not fully regulated or established yet.

I think the first step is get better clarity on what you actually want to do.
Thank you for the detail, I'm pretty set on corporate finance as a career but I'd like to know a bit about other stuff so I can keep my options open, I don't think I have the experience nor the knowledge to set my heart on one yet. I've took one exam in the certificate level of CFQ, but the next one is regulation and I don't really want to do that until I'm in the industry, unless I have a regulation module in my uni degree maybe?

I reckon those coding qualifications might be useful to pursue for now, so thank you for that, I'll take a look now.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by BenjaminSibson)
Thank you for the detail, I'm pretty set on corporate finance as a career but I'd like to know a bit about other stuff so I can keep my options open, I don't think I have the experience nor the knowledge to set my heart on one yet. I've took one exam in the certificate level of CFQ, but the next one is regulation and I don't really want to do that until I'm in the industry, unless I have a regulation module in my uni degree maybe?

I reckon those coding qualifications might be useful to pursue for now, so thank you for that, I'll take a look now.
No, there's no regulation module in your degree. The degree mostly focuses on what theoretically works, and less so on application. Unless you opt (or are required) to do a law module, you won't come across anything remotely legal or regulatory. Regulations also change all the time.
Regulation modules tend to only come up in professional qualifications.

In terms of coding for finance, I would suspect to complement the CFQ qualification, you would either be doing Python or C++ as opposed to other languages. See the following for more information:
https://www.quantstart.com/articles/...nce-Resources/
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