anonymous_new
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Hi,

I am interested in doing a course such as accounting and finance at Warwick.

If I was to get the entry requirements at least AAA if not higher A*A*A, however I have quite bad GCSE’s and did not pick maths which it requires, do I have any chance of getting in?

My a levels are:

Economics
History
Psychology

And if not, what are some investment banking target universities or degrees I could go to/do without fantastic GCSE’s and without maths?

Thanks very much.
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thrwawy
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I doubt they will let you in if you don’t have maths, you can ask but it’s unlikely but you don’t need any specific degree for investment banking so pick what you like!
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mike23mike
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(Original post by Jmd908)
Hi,

I am interested in doing a course such as accounting and finance at Warwick.

If I was to get the entry requirements at least AAA if not higher A*A*A, however I have quite bad GCSE’s and did not pick maths which it requires, do I have any chance of getting in?

My a levels are:

Economics
History
Psychology

And if not, what are some investment banking target universities or degrees I could go to/do without fantastic GCSE’s and without maths?

Thanks very much.
Going to a top uni like Warwick and studying accounting and finance would certainly put you in a strong position to be considered by an investment bank. Not having A level maths may be an issue. Investment banks want people who are numerate so any degree with numbers is considered - engineering, physics, economics, maths etc. However, with you not having A level maths you will struggle to get into any of these degrees. There are BA economics degrees so you could try to get onto one of them.
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chramos15
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unis are almost never lenient with subject specific requirement - if a course requires maths as an entry requirement and you don't study it is us likely that you will be instantly rejected from that course. sorry

the target unis are - Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick and Imperial

'semi' targets (bit more subjective so might have missed some out but its best to do your own research for the most part that isn't on student room as I'll have the investment banking police on my back if I get any wrong) but they are - Durham, Bristol, Notts, Edinburgh, St. Andrews, Kings, Bath, maybe Exeter and Manchester

a degree in any discipline from these will put you in a decent position. some more favourable than others like Econ or maths as these will obviously help massively when it comes to the numerical/technical side of interviews but there really isn't much preference when it comes to degree. what matters even more is landing relevant working experience and internships as it is ridiculously competitive to get into IB as a graduate

so yeh just pick a course that genuinely interests you. but if you don't have a level maths youre pretty limited getting onto an Econ or accounting and finance degree from some of the above. HOWEVER -

durham's accounting, accounting and finance course as well as accounting and management don't require a level maths but do require a 7 in gcse maths if not taken for a level - https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?...=BSC&year=2021


bristols accounting and finance course doesn't need a level maths but needs 7 in maths gcse -
https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/unde...nd-management/

nottingham - only needs 6 maths gcse as a requirement
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...Management-BSc

just a few. im sure there is more from the list of unis above that don't need maths a level. but don't take A&F for the sake of going into IB only take it if you actually enjoy it and are subsequently interested in pursuing a career in IB

pm me if u have any questions
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anonymous_new
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(Original post by chramos15)
unis are almost never lenient with subject specific requirement - if a course requires maths as an entry requirement and you don't study it is us likely that you will be instantly rejected from that course. sorry

the target unis are - Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick and Imperial

'semi' targets (bit more subjective so might have missed some out but its best to do your own research for the most part that isn't on student room as I'll have the investment banking police on my back if I get any wrong) but they are - Durham, Bristol, Notts, Edinburgh, St. Andrews, Kings, Bath, maybe Exeter and Manchester

a degree in any discipline from these will put you in a decent position. some more favourable than others like Econ or maths as these will obviously help massively when it comes to the numerical/technical side of interviews but there really isn't much preference when it comes to degree. what matters even more is landing relevant working experience and internships as it is ridiculously competitive to get into IB as a graduate

so yeh just pick a course that genuinely interests you. but if you don't have a level maths youre pretty limited getting onto an Econ or accounting and finance degree from some of the above. HOWEVER -

durham's accounting, accounting and finance course as well as accounting and management don't require a level maths but do require a 7 in gcse maths if not taken for a level - https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?...=BSC&year=2021


bristols accounting and finance course doesn't need a level maths but needs 7 in maths gcse -
https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/unde...nd-management/

nottingham - only needs 6 maths gcse as a requirement
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...Management-BSc

just a few. im sure there is more from the list of unis above that don't need maths a level. but don't take A&F for the sake of going into IB only take it if you actually enjoy it and are subsequently interested in pursuing a career in IB

pm me if u have any questions
I’ll be honest mate, that’s incredible. Thank you so much. Really really helpful!

Do you think if I’ve got work experience in accounting and finance, before applying to a degree at say Durham who require a 7 in maths, I got a 6. Would they potentially be lenient about the GCSE grade? As I’m part of the year who got predicted grades due to Covid and unfortunately think I would’ve got a 7 but ended up with a 6.
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McGinger
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Ask yourself why you didn't choose Maths as an A level - if it was 'I don't like Maths' or 'I'm nor very good at it', then you really do need to rethink this idea. Not only will the degree be stuffed with Maths (and higher concept stuff than A level) but the job focuses on this as well.

You might like to look at other degrees, such as Economics, instead : https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/economics_degree
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anonymous_new
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(Original post by McGinger)
Ask yourself why you didn't choose Maths as an A level - if it was 'I don't like Maths' or 'I'm nor very good at it', then you really do need to rethink this idea. Not only will the degree be stuffed with Maths (and higher concept stuff than A level) but the job focuses on this as well.

You might like to look at other degrees, such as Economics, instead : https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/economics_degree
It wasn’t that I was bad at it, I just didn’t enjoy, the parts of maths which weren’t practical. I really enjoy practical maths such as numbers percentages graphs statistics etc, but a lot of a level course isn’t focused around that. However at a degree such as accounting and finance I would hope it would be much more based on that type of maths
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chramos15
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(Original post by Jmd908)
I’ll be honest mate, that’s incredible. Thank you so much. Really really helpful!

Do you think if I’ve got work experience in accounting and finance, before applying to a degree at say Durham who require a 7 in maths, I got a 6. Would they potentially be lenient about the GCSE grade? As I’m part of the year who got predicted grades due to Covid and unfortunately think I would’ve got a 7 but ended up with a 6.
hi its pretty uncommon for unis to be lenient with subject specific grades/requirements whether it is at GCSE or A level. you could email them to ask as they are the only one who can give you an answer - but that kind of requirement is usually the first 'cut off' point when it comes to applications.

your best bet is probably to retake maths and achieve a 7 or more when you get a chance which is annoying especially bcos your grade 6 was decided by a teacher and in the actual test who knows you could have scored better. but yeh just drop them and email and ask to see if they will be lenient
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username4926198
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I agree with many others in saying that maybe you need to reconsider if investment banking is really for you. It is all about numbers. I got a 7 for GCSE maths and I'm currently in the process of retaking my maths A level and it's really hard.

Degrees such as economics require a very strong understanding of maths and universities only take those with good maths grades because they recognise that that level of understanding lies at the core of the subject at university. I don't think you'll enjoy finance and banking.

Just to put it into perspective, my tutor who has a first-class maths degree from KCL has struggled on the questions they ask for the kind of 'entrance exam' for investment banking.

If it's the money that's motivating you, you're more likely to be successful in a field you're genuinely passionate about. Try not to place too much emphasis on the end-result, just focus on the degree you'd like.
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thrwawy
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There isn’t much maths in investment banking, it’s mostly applying basic arithmetic Don’t let that put you off, go to a top uni, get good experience and grades and you’re in with a shot even if you don’t get in on a grad scheme you can lateral in from elsewhere

Edit: the people who are saying IB is all about maths are wrong, people get into IB from arts backgrounds
Last edited by thrwawy; 6 months ago
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anonymous_new
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(Original post by thrwawy)
There isn’t much maths in investment banking, it’s mostly applying basic arithmetic Don’t let that put you off, go to a top uni, get good experience and grades and you’re in with a shot even if you don’t get in on a grad scheme you can lateral in from elsewhere

Edit: the people who are saying IB is all about maths are wrong, people get into IB from arts backgrounds
Thanks, this is more what I’ve heard from a general point of view.
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BHALLAFAMILLY
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Hey,
If the reason you are interested in doing accounting and finance degree is to go into the finance sector or to do a job in the big 4 a degree in accounting and finance is not required. However, the name of the uni and the ranking of the uni will make a bigger difference, in terms of employability rates in to this industry.
If you do choose to go into the finance sector and do another degree make sure to attend work experience during uni and maybe even during year 13 summer. Doing an another degree and applying for internship in the finance sector will not make you a less competitive candidate as the process of getting into the internships is based on a aptitude test and a interview, no industry based knowledge required.
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mike23mike
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(Original post by thrwawy)
There isn’t much maths in investment banking, it’s mostly applying basic arithmetic Don’t let that put you off, go to a top uni, get good experience and grades and you’re in with a shot even if you don’t get in on a grad scheme you can lateral in from elsewhere

Edit: the people who are saying IB is all about maths are wrong, people get into IB from arts backgrounds
Hi
What you are saying is simply not true. Yes, there may the odd person from Oxford who gets into an investment bank with a degree in English but the vast majority have a quants background. Let's look at the degrees of the board of directors in Credit Suisse as an example - all have advanced degrees in quantitative subjects like Economics or Accountancy.

Urs Rohner - Chairman
Education
1990 Admission to the bar of the State of New York
1986 Admission to the bar of the Canton of Zurich
1983 Master in Law (lic.iur.), University of Zurich, Switzerland


Iris Bohnet
Education
1997 Doctorate in Economics, University of Zurich, Switzerland
1992 Master's degree in Economic History, Economics and Political Science, University of Zurich, Switzerland


Christian Gellerstad
Education
2019 Board Director Diploma, International Institute for Management Development (IMD), Switzerland
1996 Certified International Investment Analyst (CIIA) & Certified Portfolio Manager and Financial Analyst (AZEK)
1993 Master in Business Administration and Economics, University of St. Gallen (HSG), Switzerland


Michael Klein
Education
1985 Bachelors of Science in Economics (Finance and Accounting), The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

Shan Li
Education
1994 PhD in Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
1988 MA in Economics, University of California, Davis
1986 BS in Management Information Systems, Tsinghua University, Beijing


Seraina Macia
Education
2001 Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), CFA Institute, USA
1999 MBA, Monash Mt Eliza Business School, Australia
1997 Postgraduate Certificate in Management, Deakin University, Australia


Richard Meddings
Education
1983 UK Chartered Accountant, Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales
1980 BA Modern History, Exeter College, Oxford


Kai S. Nargolwala
Education
1974 Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants (FCA), England and Wales
1969 BA in Economics, University of Delhi


Ana Paula Pessoa
Education
1991 MA, FRI (Development Economics), Stanford University, California
1988 BA, Economics and International Relations, Stanford University, California


Joaquin J. Ribeiro
Education
1996 Executive Business Certificate, Columbia Business School, New York
1988 MBA in Finance, New York University, New York
1980 Certified Public Account, New York state
1978 Bachelor degree in Accounting, Pace University, New York


Severin Schwan
Education
1993 Doctor of Law, University of Innsbruck, Austria
1991 Master's degrees in Economics and Law, University of Innsbruck, Austria


John Tiner
Education
2010 Honorary Doctor of Letters, Kingston University, London
1981 UK Chartered Accountant, Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales
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thrwawy
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(Original post by mike23mike)
Hi
What you are saying is simply not true. Yes, there may the odd person from Oxford who gets into an investment bank with a degree in English but the vast majority have a quants background. Let's look at the degrees of the board of directors in Credit Suisse as an example - all have advanced degrees in quantitative subjects like Economics or Accountancy.

Urs Rohner - Chairman
Education
1990 Admission to the bar of the State of New York
1986 Admission to the bar of the Canton of Zurich
1983 Master in Law (lic.iur.), University of Zurich, Switzerland


Iris Bohnet
Education
1997 Doctorate in Economics, University of Zurich, Switzerland
1992 Master's degree in Economic History, Economics and Political Science, University of Zurich, Switzerland


Christian Gellerstad
Education
2019 Board Director Diploma, International Institute for Management Development (IMD), Switzerland
1996 Certified International Investment Analyst (CIIA) & Certified Portfolio Manager and Financial Analyst (AZEK)
1993 Master in Business Administration and Economics, University of St. Gallen (HSG), Switzerland


Michael Klein
Education
1985 Bachelors of Science in Economics (Finance and Accounting), The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

Shan Li
Education
1994 PhD in Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
1988 MA in Economics, University of California, Davis
1986 BS in Management Information Systems, Tsinghua University, Beijing


Seraina Macia
Education
2001 Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA), CFA Institute, USA
1999 MBA, Monash Mt Eliza Business School, Australia
1997 Postgraduate Certificate in Management, Deakin University, Australia


Richard Meddings
Education
1983 UK Chartered Accountant, Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales
1980 BA Modern History, Exeter College, Oxford


Kai S. Nargolwala
Education
1974 Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants (FCA), England and Wales
1969 BA in Economics, University of Delhi


Ana Paula Pessoa
Education
1991 MA, FRI (Development Economics), Stanford University, California
1988 BA, Economics and International Relations, Stanford University, California


Joaquin J. Ribeiro
Education
1996 Executive Business Certificate, Columbia Business School, New York
1988 MBA in Finance, New York University, New York
1980 Certified Public Account, New York state
1978 Bachelor degree in Accounting, Pace University, New York


Severin Schwan
Education
1993 Doctor of Law, University of Innsbruck, Austria
1991 Master's degrees in Economics and Law, University of Innsbruck, Austria


John Tiner
Education
2010 Honorary Doctor of Letters, Kingston University, London
1981 UK Chartered Accountant, Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales
You’ve taken my comment completely out of context, the OP is discussing breaking into banking not becoming a leading figure at a top IB and you’re wrong anyway 3 of the names you mentioned have BA degrees... Bachelor of ART’S, a couple of the others studied Law including the chairman, which isn’t a “quant” degree.

My point was that studying a numerate degree is by no means a requirement to get into IB, and as you have demonstrated it’s not even a requirement to become chairman of Credit Suisse
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mike23mike
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(Original post by thrwawy)
You’ve taken my comment completely out of context, the OP is discussing breaking into banking not becoming a leading figure at a top IB and you’re wrong anyway 3 of the names you mentioned have BA degrees... Bachelor of ART’S, a couple of the others studied Law including the chairman, which isn’t a “quant” degree.

My point was that studying a numerate degree is by no means a requirement to get into IB, and as you have demonstrated it’s not even a requirement to become chairman of Credit Suisse
You are correct, 3 out of the 12 directors had a non-quants background but the majority did. Thus please don't lead the OP on by suggesting its the norm for someone with a history degree from Bristol to get into investment banking; it's not. I have provided evidence that the majority of people in investment banking have a quants background. Happy to stand corrected if you can show me otherwise.
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thrwawy
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(Original post by mike23mike)
You are correct, 3 out of the 12 directors had a non-quants background but the majority did. Thus please don't lead the OP on by suggesting its the norm for someone with a history degree from Bristol to get into investment banking; it's not. I have provided evidence that the majority of people in investment banking have a quants background. Happy to stand corrected if you can show me otherwise.
You’re trying to argue with me about something I have never said, you need to re-read my original post, all I said was that you don’t need a BSc or a quants background to break into banking that’s all, I never commented on if it’s the “norm” neither did I say anything about history or Bristol so I don’t know where you’re getting that from.

Only 6 of the people have a Bachelors degree listed within their education section, of those 6 three of them are BA’s...

If you look at all of them 6/12 either have a BA or a masters in economics with either history, law or international relations, although they’re economics they are economics with a non “quant” subject so probably weren’t maths heavy masters degrees.

If you google “BA history (any investment bank) LinkedIn” you’ll find plenty of people from outside Oxbridge with BA History who are currently associate or higher working at BB IB’s
Last edited by thrwawy; 6 months ago
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