Need help with this gcse language paper 1 q2

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KacperSchl
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.thddheuejejej
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lkshmiseta
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The writer has used descriptive language to paint a picture of the garden in the readers mind.The writer uses adjectives such as " muddle", "gnarled"," tangled" etc to emphasise the nature of the garden. The writer makes use of personification when referring to the mulberry tree. It has "knuckles" " malformed hands", "long twisted shadows", "choking it" and "caged". Thus the imagery that is build up is that of a figure which is being held in a " cage"; the trunk being caught and held in check by the ivy not allowing the tree to break free from the concrete poured over its root- " broken bricks and chunks of cements".
The sense of neglect is reflected by the use of words such as "overgrown mess" "muddle of trees and shrubs" ( clearly indication that this is not a well planned, neatly laid out garden). Words like tangled ivy, nettles and brambles all emphasis the fact that the garden is not well cared for and that nature has taken over the garden by allowing the unplanned growth of ivy, nettles, brambles and muddle of trees and shrubs. Even sunlight that reaches the garden is weak since the tree is huge and covers a large area of the garden and the wintry sun is able to cast very little light.
By using adjectives, verbs and personification the writer creates an strong imagery of neglect and a sense of the struggle between man and nature where nature seems to be gaining the upper hand despite the sense of the mulberry tree being caged. It seems as though though nature is held in check by the "padlocked door", it is only a matter of time before it triumps by spreading the mass of nettles and brambles beyond it and the tree will break free from the bricks and cement that holds it now.
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KacperSchl
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[deleted] got requested my aqa member to delete this sorry!
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lkshmiseta
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I think you response is well planned. Connecting the word "unfamiliar" and seeing it as extending through the passage is impressive as well as the point about the descriptions progress from clear to blurry is well made.

good luck and keep it up
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KacperSchl
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(Original post by lkshmiseta)
I think you response is well planned. Connecting the word "unfamiliar" and seeing it as extending through the passage is impressive as well as the point about the descriptions progress from clear to blurry is well made.

good luck and keep it up
TY
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jamieh_05
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I’ve got this as an exam today 😬
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Patricia lopes
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Which board is this?
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KacperSchl
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(Original post by jamieh_05)
I’ve got this as an exam today 😬
yh its the 2020 paper
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KacperSchl
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(Original post by Patricia lopes)
Which board is this?
aqa language paper 1 q2
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taiba.h
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(Original post by KacperSchl)
This is what I got for my HW it was due today morning so I wrote this last night. Got full marks so that's good.

The writer uses the adjective 'unfamiliar' which suggests the garden is one of a kind, and very different from an ordinary garden. This also allows the reader to experience the garden in Rosie's perspective as she also never seen anything like this. The use of the triplets 'overgrown mess, a muddle of trees and shrubs' gives the impression that the garden was isolated from the rest of the world. The writer paints a vivid image of the garden to make it certain that the readers are imagining the exact same garden. This would be needed if the garden is an extended metaphor that represents a theme throughout the story.

The writer uses personification/anthropomorphism of the 'gigantic malformed hand' in order to give the garden an animalistic appearance. The garden was isolated for so long it was able to retain it's wild forms, which is later reinforced by the adjective 'ancient'. The writer uses many dynamic verbs such as 'snarled' and 'choking'. The word 'snarled' defines as an aggressive growl, this personification gives a sense of intimidation and danger portrayed by the garden.The word 'choking' could be foreshadowing a character's death. This could also show that the garden has outgrown it's captivity.The description seems to progress from a clear and structured to blurry near the end. It seems like the adjective 'unfamiliar' is extended throughout this description.
Your answer is very well planned out and amazing isn’t there any chance you can help me with question 4 it’s the same extract
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hakim123!!1
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(Original post by KacperSchl)
The extract:Rosie had made a quick check of the unfamiliar garden before letting the children go out to play. The bottom half of the garden was an overgrown mess, a muddle of trees and shrubs. An ancient mulberry tree stood at the centre. Its massive twisted branches drooped to the ground in places, its knuckles in the earth like a gigantic malformed hand. The wintry sun hung low in the sky and the gnarled growth threw long twisted shadows across the undergrowth within its cage. The trunk of the tree was snarled with the tangled ivy that grew up through the broken bricks and chunks of cement, choking it. The path that led down towards the fence at the bottom, which marked the garden off from an orchard beyond, disappeared into a mass of nettles and brambles before it reached the padlocked door.
The question : How does the writer use language here to describe the garden? Need help I am stuck, need this for HW
hey can you send me q 3,4,5 and paper 2 if you have it from 2020 English language exams please kinda in need
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KacperSchl
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(Original post by hakim123!!1)
hey can you send me q 3,4,5 and paper 2 if you have it from 2020 English language exams please kinda in need
cant aqa member told me to delete this post lol
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0_gxrv_0
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Hey I need help with Q4 on this same paper, I had it yesterday and I wanna "make sure that I got it right".
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I’m that girl xx
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(Original post by lkshmiseta)
The writer has used descriptive language to paint a picture of the garden in the readers mind.The writer uses adjectives such as " muddle", "gnarled"," tangled" etc to emphasise the nature of the garden. The writer makes use of personification when referring to the mulberry tree. It has "knuckles" " malformed hands", "long twisted shadows", "choking it" and "caged". Thus the imagery that is build up is that of a figure which is being held in a " cage"; the trunk being caught and held in check by the ivy not allowing the tree to break free from the concrete poured over its root- " broken bricks and chunks of cements".
The sense of neglect is reflected by the use of words such as "overgrown mess" "muddle of trees and shrubs" ( clearly indication that this is not a well planned, neatly laid out garden). Words like tangled ivy, nettles and brambles all emphasis the fact that the garden is not well cared for and that nature has taken over the garden by allowing the unplanned growth of ivy, nettles, brambles and muddle of trees and shrubs. Even sunlight that reaches the garden is weak since the tree is huge and covers a large area of the garden and the wintry sun is able to cast very little light.
By using adjectives, verbs and personification the writer creates an strong imagery of neglect and a sense of the struggle between man and nature where nature seems to be gaining the upper hand despite the sense of the mulberry tree being caged. It seems as though though nature is held in check by the "padlocked door", it is only a matter of time before it triumps by spreading the mass of nettles and brambles beyond it and the tree will break free from the bricks and cement that holds it now.
This is really good btw what question is this I know it’s aqa paper1
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hycksfltr
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(Original post by I’m that girl xx)
This is really good btw what question is this I know it’s aqa paper1
It's question 2, "How does the writer use language here to describe the garden?"
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timikofo1
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(Original post by hycksfltr)
It's question 2, "How does the writer use language here to describe the garden?"
do u have question 4
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hycksfltr
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(Original post by timikofo1)
do u have question 4
yh it's something like, a student said "I wasn't surprised at the stranger child's disappearance at the end. She is just part of Rosie's imagination."

To what extent do you agree?
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(Original post by hycksfltr)
yh it's something like, a student said "I wasn't surprised at the stranger child's disappearance at the end. She is just part of Rosie's imagination."

To what extent do you agree?
do you have the model answer
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Joe6280
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(Original post by KacperSchl)
.thddheuejejej
Hello, I can help you out. Please find attached the prompt
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Ibz.miah100
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(Original post by KacperSchl)
[deleted] got requested my aqa member to delete this sorry!
Hi I’ve seen your answer and I’m really impressed, if you don’t mind I need help with the other questions and would appreciate it, I understand that you may be busy so I’m willing to pay for your time
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