23, no GCSEs, no qualifications, what now?

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confusedguye
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Forgive the dramatics but I'm in a bit of a pickle right now, due to some strong anxiety issues I missed a lot of schooling and left before the GCSEs were to start and ended up missing the entire exam. I've spent time sorting those issues out and now I find myself at 23 with no qualifications to speak of.

I'm determined to pull myself up from this scenario and I'd like to one day obtain a degree (I've always liked the idea of being a Librarian 😛) I'm confident in my determination yet am unsure which steps to take to get there, it makes sense to acquire an English and Maths GCSE but I'm also unsure how to go about that. Can these things be done online? How would I do that? I'd appreciate any advice and guidance, thank you.
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Moonlight rain
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I think you need to apply at a private exam centre which is not free btw for either november or may/June. But there a lot of resources online to help you study or you could hire a tutor.
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wizkid44
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Hey! Try the open university, I quickly searched and found this article which leads me to believe they offer courses for level 2 English and maths

http://www.open.ac.uk/business/appre...pprenticeships
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Daniel423
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https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=3584121
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confusedguye
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(Original post by wizkid44)
Hey! Try the open university, I quickly searched and found this article which leads me to believe they offer courses for level 2 English and maths

http://www.open.ac.uk/business/appre...pprenticeships
Thanks, is that a real university? I didn't know they could be solely based online.
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confusedguye
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(Original post by Moonlight rain)
I think you need to apply at a private exam centre which is not free btw for either november or may/June. But there a lot of resources online to help you study or you could hire a tutor.
Cheers, do you know any good resources for studying those subjects?
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chlo_bel
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Education is not for everyone. Have you thought about an apprenticeship or a job in your local Maccy D's?
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Barbarian l200
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(Original post by chlo_bel)
Education is not for everyone. Have you thought about an apprenticeship or a job in your local Maccy D's?
Even McDonald's look for Maths and English gcses. An aprentiship wouldn't be possible
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Barbarian l200
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You can retake your maths and english GCSEs in college, I don't know if you'll have to pay though due to your age but its worth paying or your consequence is that you have virtually no hope of a normal adult life. It probably can't be done online, you'll need to go to college and maybe an online tutor on top of that
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confusedguye
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(Original post by chlo_bel)
Education is not for everyone. Have you thought about an apprenticeship or a job in your local Maccy D's?
I'd prefer to avoid it as I'm committed to learning and self improvement, this includes mental bettering through education now I'm in a better position to do so. But thank you
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confusedguye
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(Original post by Barbarian l200)
You can retake your maths and english GCSEs in college, I don't know if you'll have to pay though due to your age but its worth paying or your consequence is that you have virtually no hope of a normal adult life.
I'll focus on that, would it be worth it to focus on the others? Cheers.
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Barbarian l200
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(Original post by confusedguye)
I'll focus on that, would it be worth it to focus on the others? Cheers.
Maths and English are the most essential, it is vital to get them and other subjects might be too much to focus on.
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Lalas03
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Check the Open Uni out, I’m in similar situation n OU seems like the best solution
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artful_lounger
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If your ultimate goal is going to uni, I'd recommend looking at Access to HE courses near you as a stepping stone to that. You may be able to enter one directly without GCSEs, and some do allow you to take one or two GCSEs alongside the course (although access courses I understand tend to be fairly intensive even without that so if you have been out of education for some time it may be worth trying to get the maths/Eng GCSEs first to prepare yourself).

For going into librarianship my understanding is in the UK you usually need to do an undergrad degree in any subject, then an approved masters course in the field of library (and information) sciences/studies/services. I think it's typical to have spent some time working as a library assistant before that. There are also part time course options to pursue alongside work in a library. Since you need an undergrad degree first and it can be in any subject, you should also think about what you want to study for your undergrad - definitely pick something you are interested in and/or enjoy doing!

As an alternative to some of the above, you could also explore the Open University as an option, especially if you are already working (in a library or otherwise). There are usually no formal requirements to start studying with the OU, and you can also do certain foundation modules for free if you have a low income. They also offer a lot of free taster modules if you wanted to explore different subjects also it is possible to start studying with the OU then apply to a degree at a brick uni (although your OU studies may affect your entitlement for further finance for a full time programme so this is something to plan carefully!). Eventually you would probably need the English and maths GCSEs though for job purposes and to get a master's in library sciences/studies. So still worth looking into the GCSE side of things for those two, but the OU may be an alternative to an Access course, especially if you can't commit to studying full time.
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confusedguye
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
If your ultimate goal is going to uni, I'd recommend looking at Access to HE courses near you as a stepping stone to that. You may be able to enter one directly without GCSEs, and some do allow you to take one or two GCSEs alongside the course (although access courses I understand tend to be fairly intensive even without that so if you have been out of education for some time it may be worth trying to get the maths/Eng GCSEs first to prepare yourself).

For going into librarianship my understanding is in the UK you usually need to do an undergrad degree in any subject, then an approved masters course in the field of library (and information) sciences/studies/services. I think it's typical to have spent some time working as a library assistant before that. There are also part time course options to pursue alongside work in a library. Since you need an undergrad degree first and it can be in any subject, you should also think about what you want to study for your undergrad - definitely pick something you are interested in and/or enjoy doing!

As an alternative to some of the above, you could also explore the Open University as an option, especially if you are already working (in a library or otherwise). There are usually no formal requirements to start studying with the OU, and you can also do certain foundation modules for free if you have a low income. They also offer a lot of free taster modules if you wanted to explore different subjects also it is possible to start studying with the OU then apply to a degree at a brick uni (although your OU studies may affect your entitlement for further finance for a full time programme so this is something to plan carefully!). Eventually you would probably need the English and maths GCSEs though for job purposes and to get a master's in library sciences/studies. So still worth looking into the GCSE side of things for those two, but the OU may be an alternative to an Access course, especially if you can't commit to studying full time.
Oh cheers, would I require A Levels? They require 5 GCSE's don't they? I doubt it's feasible to obtain 5 in addition to the rest of this
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by confusedguye)
Oh cheers, would I require A Levels? They require 5 GCSE's don't they? I doubt it's feasible to obtain 5 in addition to the rest of this
For mature students with Access courses, usually universities are a little more flexible in their requirements (although if they require particular subjects at GCSE or A-level then they would expect you to have studied these or equivalent in your Access course).

With the OU you can start without GCSEs or A-levels, probably beginning with one of their foundation modules then doing some level 1 modules. Requirements for individual Access courses may vary, some may take you without GCSEs while some may not, you would need to check them individually. The Access course (or OU study) would be in place of A-levels so you wouldn't need to do A-levels as well (unless you needed to fulfill a subject prerequisite that isn't satisfied by the Access course, e.g. you needed A-level Maths for your desired degree programme and they advised you that your Access course did not meet that requirement, then you would need to look into doing A-level Maths as well separately).
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wizkid44
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(Original post by confusedguye)
Thanks, is that a real university? I didn't know they could be solely based online.
The open university yeah! They’re a real university, and have a wide range of courses. For the English and maths, I don’t think you can do your GCSEs there but you can get Hugh enough qualifications to be elegible for some apprenticeships
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Arden University
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(Original post by confusedguye)
Forgive the dramatics but I'm in a bit of a pickle right now, due to some strong anxiety issues I missed a lot of schooling and left before the GCSEs were to start and ended up missing the entire exam. I've spent time sorting those issues out and now I find myself at 23 with no qualifications to speak of.

I'm determined to pull myself up from this scenario and I'd like to one day obtain a degree (I've always liked the idea of being a Librarian 😛) I'm confident in my determination yet am unsure which steps to take to get there, it makes sense to acquire an English and Maths GCSE but I'm also unsure how to go about that. Can these things be done online? How would I do that? I'd appreciate any advice and guidance, thank you.
confusedguye
Hello! I notice that another poster has recommended an Access to HE program (of which I teach on one of them so I should be able to advise). Access is a program aimed at 19+ year olds, you will be entitled to an advanced learner loan for the course that would be written off when you complete your degree. Most FE college's have provision which includes Nursing & Midwifery, Primary Teaching, Social Sciences (for Social Work type roles), Engineering, and Business. Some providers have pathways covering law, pharmacy and several others. I would recommend doing the course with an FE college as the online versions are not very good and have high drop out rates

However, in order to get onto an Access to HE program you would need a good GCSE in English and Maths first (Science too if you want to do primary teaching or midwifery) - these are professional requirements for those area's. I think it might be best doing your GCSE's first, that way they have a broad appeal to employers if you decide to not move onto Access and a degree too.

I had profound anxiety when I was a student, and studying a distanced learning course really helped me, 100% online. I'm currently doing my Masters with Arden, why not check out the website - https://arden.ac.uk/

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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Kogomogo
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I think there is funding out there for adult learners to do gcse equivalent qualifications. Could contact local colleges and ask what they can provide for you and what funding is there, they usually have maths, english and it courses for adult learners.
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Kerzen
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(Original post by confusedguye)

I'm determined to pull myself up from this scenario and I'd like to one day obtain a degree (I've always liked the idea of being a Librarian 😛)
Where is your nearest large library?
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