ibtiix15
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A lot of people I have seen have told me that psych is useless and I shouldn't pick it. I want to become a neuropsychologist so I could also go into neuroscience. I'm not really that good with Maths so is neuroscience heavily maths-based? Should I pick it?
~ PS I study a Level 3 course
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Ackman
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neuro bro
yes, it's harder but as a rule of thumb the harder you work in life the more you get out of it.
don't complicate things. if you want to party have fun and still come out with a 2:1 and you aren't that ambitious go for psych. If you are ambitious and want to work hard for a 2:1 and are prepared to take a hit on the social side of things do neuro.
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by Ackman)
neuro bro
yes, it's harder but as a rule of thumb the harder you work in life the more you get out of it.
don't complicate things. if you want to party have fun and still come out with a 2:1 and you aren't that ambitious go for psych. If you are ambitious and want to work hard for a 2:1 and are prepared to take a hit on the social side of things do neuro.
Do you recommend doing a double major? so like psych AND neuro? or is that overcomplicating things? I don't really mind doing neuro but apparently, it's very prominent in maths and I'm not really that good at it.
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Ackman
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
Do you recommend doing a double major? so like psych AND neuro? or is that overcomplicating things? I don't really mind doing neuro but apparently, it's very prominent in maths and I'm not really that good at it.
yeah double sounds about right
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Hazelly
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
Do you recommend doing a double major? so like psych AND neuro? or is that overcomplicating things? I don't really mind doing neuro but apparently, it's very prominent in maths and I'm not really that good at it.
If you're going to do psych alongside neuroscience make sure it's BPS accredited. As if you want to become a psychologist you'll need the bps accreditation (British Psychological Society).
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by Ackman)
yeah double sounds about right
Are you sure I can pull it off? I mean I am hardworking and very focused on my studies but the maths and physics in neuroscience are going to kill me...
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by Hazelly)
If you're going to do psych alongside neuroscience make sure it's BPS accredited. As if you want to become a psychologist you'll need the bps accreditation (British Psychological Society).
How will I know? Will it say it on the university website?
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Ackman
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
Are you sure I can pull it off? I mean I am hardworking and very focused on my studies but the maths and physics in neuroscience are going to kill me
yeah your social life is gonna take a hit.
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by Ackman)
yeah your social life is gonna take a hit.
How bad will it tank?
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Ackman
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
How bad will it tank?
you won't be able to go out every weekend unless you are uber organised.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
How will I know? Will it say it on the university website?
Usually the uni course pages will make it clear if it's BPS accredited (unis like to advertise this ). If it doesn't say anything about accreditation I'd recommend contacting the course provider to ask, but assume it isn't while you wait for confirmation.

You may want to consider joint honours courses in psychology and/with (cognitive) neuroscience, which will allow you to gain a (usually) BPS accredited psychology degree but also include more neuroscience content. KCL's course is probably one of the best examples. There are also a number of psychology courses that are very neuroscientific in nature anyway, such as Oxford, Cambridge, and UCL's courses. These usually require one or more sciences at A-level though.

As far as maths goes, any psychology degree will necessarily include a fair bit of statistics work. So you need to be prepared to do that. However they usually don't expect or require you to have done A-level Maths. Neuroscience degrees will likewise include a fair bit of statistics based work usually, however as a science degree there may be other bits of maths in there (e.g. certain equations you may need to solve or similar) and you need to generally be able to think and work in a quantitative, scientific way for a neuroscience degree. Note also single honours neuroscience courses usually require at least two STEM subjects at A-level, often requiring both A-level Biology and A-level Chemistry.
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TasteLikeChicken
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Disclaimer: I am from a CompSci/AI background.

Are you certain neuro is that mathematical? There are absolutely applications such as computational and mathematical neuroscience which are very mathematical (as someone with a decent education in mathematics, I struggle with some of the maths). But if it's a more biological course, then there will be less maths for sure. I doubt that you will be doing calculus or anything like that in a neuro course. If you can, send me a link to a neuro course that you're looking at, and I'll try and figure out how mathsy it is!
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Usually the uni course pages will make it clear if it's BPS accredited (unis like to advertise this ). If it doesn't say anything about accreditation I'd recommend contacting the course provider to ask, but assume it isn't while you wait for confirmation.

You may want to consider joint honours courses in psychology and/with (cognitive) neuroscience, which will allow you to gain a (usually) BPS accredited psychology degree but also include more neuroscience content. KCL's course is probably one of the best examples. There are also a number of psychology courses that are very neuroscientific in nature anyway, such as Oxford, Cambridge, and UCL's courses. These usually require one or more sciences at A-level though.

As far as maths goes, any psychology degree will necessarily include a fair bit of statistics work. So you need to be prepared to do that. However they usually don't expect or require you to have done A-level Maths. Neuroscience degrees will likewise include a fair bit of statistics based work usually, however as a science degree there may be other bits of maths in there (e.g. certain equations you may need to solve or similar) and you need to generally be able to think and work in a quantitative, scientific way for a neuroscience degree. Note also single honours neuroscience courses usually require at least two STEM subjects at A-level, often requiring both A-level Biology and A-level Chemistry.
Oh is that so? I don't think I can do a double major then because I do a BTEC level 3 course that contains bio and psych
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by Ackman)
you won't be able to go out every weekend unless you are uber organised.
Oh, that's fine then. I wasn't planning on "going out" anyways.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
Oh is that so? I don't think I can do a double major then because I do a BTEC level 3 course that contains bio and psych
If you're applying in the UK, the term "double major" doesn't apply, because you don't have "majors" in the UK degree format. It's an American term, due to how their (very different) degrees are structured. In the UK if you are studying two (or more) subjects it will be referred to by universities and UCAS as a joint honours or combined honours programme. "Major" is only occasionally used in certain programmes like liberal arts or natural sciences, where the main subject of study isn't indicated by the degree name, or sometimes to describe the split between focus in subjects in a joint honours course where the two subjects are not studied evenly.

In any case, your background may suitable for some neuroscience oriented courses, although I'd recommend contacting any unis to check beforehand. Also if you wanted to study neuroscience as a single honours subject you could still do so even without a background in biology and/or chemistry by applying to a course with a foundation year.
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by TasteLikeChicken)
Disclaimer: I am from a CompSci/AI background.

Are you certain neuro is that mathematical? There are absolutely applications such as computational and mathematical neuroscience which are very mathematical (as someone with a decent education in mathematics, I struggle with some of the maths). But if it's a more biological course, then there will be less maths for sure. I doubt that you will be doing calculus or anything like that in a neuro course. If you can, send me a link to a neuro course that you're looking at, and I'll try and figure out how mathsy it is
Well I was planning on doing a double bachelor's in Neuroscience and Psychology but I don't know officially yet
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TasteLikeChicken
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
Well I was planning on doing a double bachelor's in Neuroscience and Psychology but I don't know officially yet
Okay, pick a uni you like the look of. Pick either a neuroscience or neuroscience and psychology dual honours course and send me the link. I can give you an idea about the maths you need!
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ibtiix15
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I don't have particular links but I am sure you will be able to find it by searching 'Neuroscience and Psychology undergraduate bachelor's degree'
I appreciate your help!!
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TasteLikeChicken
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(Original post by ibtiix15)
I don't have particular links but I am sure you will be able to find it by searching 'Neuroscience and Psychology undergraduate bachelor's degree'
I appreciate your help!!
You really shouldn't be expecting someone to do all the work for you, especially when they're offering to help. You could easily have followed your own instructions and found a course for me. :rolleyes:

https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/underg...andpsychology/

I quickly skimmed over that course at Keele (decent uni, higher ranked unis may be more mathematical, however), and aside from the usual stats that you'd need for any biological science/psychology course (mainly statistical methods and tests, inference, and some stats modelling), it doesn't seem mathematical at all. If you're aiming for top unis, it may be different, so you'd have to look around and tell me which course you'd like from there.

Do note, that there are courses such as 'Psychology and Cognitive Science', where neuroscience and cognitive science have significant overlap.
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ibtiix15
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(Original post by TasteLikeChicken)
You really shouldn't be expecting someone to do all the work for you, especially when they're offering to help. You could easily have followed your own instructions and found a course for me. :rolleyes:

https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/underg...andpsychology/

I quickly skimmed over that course at Keele (decent uni, higher ranked unis may be more mathematical, however), and aside from the usual stats that you'd need for any biological science/psychology course (mainly statistical methods and tests, inference, and some stats modelling), it doesn't seem mathematical at all. If you're aiming for top unis, it may be different, so you'd have to look around and tell me which course you'd like from there.

Do note, that there are courses such as 'Psychology and Cognitive Science', where neuroscience and cognitive science have significant overlap.
I wasn't expecting anyone to do anything for me. I am literally a year 12 student with loads of coursework so looking universities is not my priority at the moment. Nevertheless, thank you for your help.
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