Are BTECs for the people who aren't smart enough to do A Levels? Watch

iholdthem
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#181
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#181
(Original post by im so academic)
Oh no. Why on earth did you decide to do a BTEC National Diploma?
I thought it was a good idea at the time, but now I've wasted a year of my life and gotta finish. It's good that I am doing A levels in my own time to help though
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im so academic
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#182
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#182
(Original post by iholdthem)
I thought it was a good idea at the time, but now I've wasted a year of my life and gotta finish. It's good that I am doing A levels in my own time to help though
:sigh:

It definitely wasn't!

Hmm... Foundation degree and then progress onto a BSc/BA? :dontknow:
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LaylaLaw
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#183
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#183
(Original post by im so academic)
Oh no. Why on earth did you decide to do a BTEC National Diploma?



Woah. Poor range of A-level subjects, apart from English Lit.

Oh God, a BTEC National Award in Performing Arts. :sigh:

Lol, you were planning on doing Drama and Theatre at A-level? :rofl:

HOWEVER, the degree "matches" the career you're doing, which is good. You're doing a degrre to get onto your chosen career path.

But at Keele? :erm: Fair enough.
I do not appreciate your rudeness and actually when you study the subjects they interlink nicely. My school did not offer a Drama & Theatre studies A Level, therefore that was never a option. What is wrong with Keele?
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Doodahdoo
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#184
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#184
(Original post by im so academic)
Lol, you were planning on doing Drama and Theatre at A-level? :rofl:
I have to say, I learned a lot more - both in academic terms and personal skills - doing Drama & Theatre studies than I did in English Lit at A-level.
A lot of it overlapped anyway - things like analysing the text and considering the context of the work, interpreting text and intention, essay writing and comparing and contrasting texts. There was obviously the difference in the performance aspect, and there wasn't quite as in-depth interpretation and analysis of literature, as there was more interpretation of actual performances too, but there was certainly a lot of similarity.
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Flying Cow
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#185
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#185
I have done both. A levels, personally, were dull and just generally unenjoyable. I did Chemistry, Biology and IT, and as I didn't want to do IT, it didn't work out particularly well for me. I had no interest in the subject whatsoever and, although I put effort into it, it was nothing compared to the effort of Chemistry and Biology. Now to do my A levels, I stayed in my secondary school, which was a huge mistake. My Chemistry teacher was new for starters and didn't have a clue about what modules we were doing and so her teaching was appalling. I failed the AS exams of Chemistry and IT, so I thought I might as well quit now and do a Btec instead.

I did a Btec in Medical Science, which was basically Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Engineering and I absolutely loved it. Biology was more "hands on" than it had been when I had done it as an A level and Chemistry was much more enjoyable because the teacher actually KNEW what he was talking about. There was still a lot of work involved but because I thoroughly enjoyed the subjects, I found it wasn't a chore to do. Btec is not as hard as A levels for the simple fact that there are no exams whatsoever, but it is certainly not a walk in the park either.
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im so academic
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#186
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#186
(Original post by LaylaLaw)
I do not appreciate your rudeness and actually when you study the subjects they interlink nicely. My school did not offer a Drama & Theatre studies A Level, therefore that was never a option. What is wrong with Keele?
So what if the subejcts interlink nicely?

Media, Film and Theatre all interlink nicely. It doesn't make it a good selection though.

Yeah, I know. :rolleyes: Thank God your school didn't offer a Drama and Theatre A-level. I'm sorry, but it is hardly as challenging intellectually as Physics.

(And before you complain about not having studied Drama/Theatre - believe me, I have. The worthless and pathetic waste of my time).

What is wrong with Keele? Well, there's nothing "wrong" with Keele - but, be honest, it's hardly Imperial or Oxbridge, is it?

(Please don't bang on about how those universities don't offer your subject - I'm talking of the university as a whole).
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im so academic
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#187
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#187
(Original post by Doodahdoo)
I have to say, I learned a lot more - both in academic terms and personal skills - doing Drama & Theatre studies than I did in English Lit at A-level.
A lot of it overlapped anyway - things like analysing the text and considering the context of the work, interpreting text and intention, essay writing and comparing and contrasting texts. There was obviously the difference in the performance aspect, and there wasn't quite as in-depth interpretation and analysis of literature, as there was more interpretation of actual performances too, but there was certainly a lot of similarity.
But at the end of the day English Lit > Drama and Theatre.

Maybe you're confusing the fact that (I believe) in English, it's mostly about independent study and personal analysis, so I can understand why you think you learnt less in English Lit, than in Drama.
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Doodahdoo
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#188
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#188
(Original post by im so academic)
But at the end of the day English Lit > Drama and Theatre.
I know - and that's what I'm saying, it's stupid - and people like you seem to reaffirm the (incorrect) assumption.

(Original post by im so academic)
Maybe you're confusing the fact that (I believe) in English, it's mostly about independent study and personal analysis, so I can understand why you think you learnt less in English Lit, than in Drama.
Nah man. Appreciate what you're saying, but honestly, you're way off the mark. I'm not talking about stuff you learn in class, I'm talking about skills and knowledge you gain throughout the whole course.
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LaylaLaw
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#189
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#189
(Original post by im so academic)
What is wrong with Keele? Well, there's nothing "wrong" with Keele - but, be honest, it's hardly Imperial or Oxbridge, is it?
But I don't want to go to Imperial or Oxbridge...
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im so academic
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#190
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#190
(Original post by Doodahdoo)
I know - and that's what I'm saying, it's stupid - and people like you seem to reaffirm the (incorrect) assumption.
But come on! It's true! There are "classes" of subjects.

Don't tell me that Media Studies > English Literature.

Nah man. Appreciate what you're saying, but honestly, you're way off the mark. I'm not talking about stuff you learn in class, I'm talking about skills and knowledge you gain throughout the whole course.
Fair enough, but let's be honest, English Lit > Drama.

You could say that Drama gives you skills in acting, but English Lit doesn't. What matters is that you develop useful skills rather than learn and develop loads of different ones.
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im so academic
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#191
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#191
(Original post by LaylaLaw)
But I don't want to go to Imperial or Oxbridge...
Surely you could aim higher than Keele though? (regardless if you like the university or not).

Just "aim" higher, right?
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LaylaLaw
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#192
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#192
(Original post by im so academic)
Surely you could aim higher than Keele though? (regardless if you like the university or not).

Just "aim" higher, right?
Keele is 42nd on the Times list, so it's actually quite good compared to some! I like Keele and that is more important to me than going to a higher rated uni I don't want to be a lawyer so it doesn't matter as much, right?
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jelly1000
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#193
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#193
Yes. It's offered to those who fail their GCSE's at my school 6th form.
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Doodahdoo
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#194
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#194
(Original post by im so academic)
You could say that Drama gives you skills in acting, but English Lit doesn't. What matters is that you develop useful skills rather than learn and develop loads of different ones.
That's very true. But skills like interpretation and analysis of varying texts, critical appraisal, communication - both verbal and written, self-assessment and report-writing, essay-writing (seriously, 20 pages of essay + 3.5hr long exam for A-level year alone), time and stress management, coordination and planning are all very useful skills, not only for a degree but for employment too. I know through talking to them that a lot of employers appreciate courses that develop academic and applicable skills as oppose to academic skills alone.

Have you studied Drama, out of interest, or is all of this based on your impression of what the course is like?
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im so academic
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#195
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#195
(Original post by LaylaLaw)
Keele is 42nd on the Times list, so it's actually quite good compared to some! I like Keele and that is more important to me than going to a higher rated uni I don't want to be a lawyer so it doesn't matter as much, right?
42nd? That's pathetic for me tbh. I wouldn't even touch the top 20, let alone a university at 42!

Surely there are other higher rated unis that you would've loved to go to - maybe even more than Keele?

OK, but if you change your mind about career plans? :dontknow:
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im so academic
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#196
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#196
(Original post by Doodahdoo)
That's very true. But skills like interpretation and analysis of varying texts, critical appraisal, communication - both verbal and written, self-assessment and report-writing, essay-writing (seriously, 20 pages of essay + 3.5hr long exam for A-level year alone), time and stress management, coordination and planning are all very useful skills, not only for a degree but for employment too. I know through talking to them that a lot of employers appreciate courses that develop academic and applicable skills as oppose to academic skills alone.

Have you studied Drama, out of interest, or is all of this based on your impression of what the course is like?
Oh come on! Let's be honest - if you were going for a job for, let's say, the Guardian, do you really think they would appreciate a Drama degree more than a English degree just because it has "applicable" skills? And please, don't say that "because it's in the field of journalism, obviously an English degree would be more favourable".

I would argue that there are many famous actors and actresses that studied English, and those that moved into other areas completely unrelated with English - such as Stephen Fry. He was on the stage, but did he do Drama? No, he did English at Cambridge - a perfect example of a degree with only "academic" skills.

Yes, I actually have studied Drama - as part of compulsory lessons, and voluntary sessions that I had took previously, but have now given up.
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Doodahdoo
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#197
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#197
(Original post by im so academic)
Oh come on! Let's be honest - if you were going for a job for, let's say, the Guardian, do you really think they would appreciate a Drama degree more than a English degree just because it has "applicable" skills? And please, don't say that "because it's in the field of journalism, obviously an English degree would be more favourable".

I would argue that there are many famous actors and actresses that studied English, and those that moved into other areas completely unrelated with English - such as Stephen Fry. He was on the stage, but did he do Drama? No, he did English at Cambridge - a perfect example of a degree with only "academic" skills.

Yes, I actually have studied Drama - as part of compulsory lessons, and voluntary sessions that I had took previously, but have now given up.
I'm not talking about a job at The Guardian. I'm just talking about jobs generally. And I'm not saying it for teh lulz, I'm saying it because it's what I've heard from talking to a number of family friends in a number of differing businesses.

And I'm also not talking at degree-level, at the moment I'm still talking A-level? I thought that was what we were on?
If we're talking degree-level, that's completely different and not something I've experienced, so don't feel qualified to talk about.

Drama & Theatre Studies A-level is such a step up from GCSE. Painfully so. The workload is so much greater than most other subjects, in both group and independent study - the amount of assessed work you have to do is considerably greater and - in my experience, anyway - the exams are longer, but the quality of work you have to produce is the same as other essay-based subjects. It's certainly not the doss subject so many people (who haven't taken it) seem to think it is.
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im so academic
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#198
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#198
(Original post by Doodahdoo)
I'm not talking about a job at The Guardian. I'm just talking about jobs generally. And I'm not saying it for teh lulz, I'm saying it because it's what I've heard from talking to a number of family friends in a number of differing businesses.
I was just giving an example.

Come on! You can't possibly say a Drama degree is more preferable than an English degree? I refuse to believe that.

Drama & Theatre Studies A-level is such a step up from GCSE. Painfully so. The workload is so much greater than most other subjects, in both group and independent study - the amount of assessed work you have to do is considerably greater and - in my experience, anyway - the exams are longer, but the quality of work you have to produce is the same as other essay-based subjects. It's certainly not the doss subject so many people (who haven't taken it) seem to think it is.
So is any other subject (within reason). What makes Drama & Theatre so special?
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Doodahdoo
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#199
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#199
:facepalm2:

for somebody who rates academia so highly, you're not so hot off the mark are you?!

(Original post by im so academic)
I was just giving an example.

Come on! You can't possibly say a Drama degree is more preferable than an English degree? I refuse to believe that.
I know. Which was exactly why I said that I wasn't going to pass comment, because I haven't experienced it. I have experienced Drama&Theatre Studies vs. English Lit at A-level, which is why I feel qualified to comment on both.

(Original post by im so academic)
So is any other subject (within reason). What makes Drama & Theatre so special?
Becuause it does require so much more work. I remember being the very first people into school and the very last people out, for most of the academic year. I remember people who were doing maths, further maths and chemistry being shocked at the sheer amount of work that we (and art, and other design courses) had to do. I remember the envy that I had for pretty much every other course, just because they got to piss about and go out most nights, whilst I was still at home studying for Drama.

It's not an easy course. It isn't regarded the same as English, I'll happily concede that. People are, after all, assumptive and stupid. However, Drama was easily one of the most intense, time-consuming and draining A-levels that our school offered, along with art and design courses. And you really can't fight that.
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im so academic
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#200
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#200
(Original post by Doodahdoo)
Becuause it does require so much more work. I remember being the very first people into school and the very last people out, for most of the academic year. I remember people who were doing maths, further maths and chemistry being shocked at the sheer amount of work that we (and art, and other design courses) had to do. I remember the envy that I had for pretty much every other course, just because they got to piss about and go out most nights, whilst I was still at home studying for Drama.

It's not an easy course. It isn't regarded the same as English, I'll happily concede that. People are, after all, assumptive and stupid. However, Drama was easily one of the most intense, time-consuming and draining A-levels that our school offered, along with art and design courses. And you really can't fight that.
Then why do this time-consuming, stressful course then? Especially since it's not as respected as Drama.

You know Drama was going to be tougher than other subjects (mind, not intellectually speaking), so you have no one to blame other than yourself for choosing to do it.
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