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    I don't take illegal drugs because:

    It's illegal. Not that I think legality = morality, but if I was found out I'd be in the crapper, and I don't fancy that.
    Most administration methods don't appeal to me.
    I'm worried about the risks of drugs being cut with other dangerous and unpredictable substances.
    I don't want to risk addiction, as I have an addictive personality.
    They are very expensive.

    I don't have any sense that drugs are immoral, I just don't fancy getting involved with them.
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    (Original post by Sophi*)
    For people who have never taken illegal drugs.. why not?

    Is it because of drugs education in school?
    Another persons experience?
    Fear of the physical consequences?
    Fear of the legal consequences?
    Any other reason?

    Just interested as I may base my dissertation around this area but wanted to test the general topic area out a bit first.

    (If you could mention your age as well that would be very helpful!)
    Most obvious one: my friends don't do drugs. I just didn't grow up in that kind of environment. I feel very detached from the idea of drugs.
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    (Original post by CandyFlipper)
    You've made an insane level of assumptions there. Most women who are heroin addicts and prostitute themselves have had a terrible life which is nothing like a life the average TSR user could understand. Its not like a middle class girl just starts taking heroin and then prostitutes herself, thats not how drug experimentation works, a lot of what happens depends on a whole range of things such as economic circumstance.

    I don't know of a single person who takes drugs that would claim heroin or crack are cool, or trendy etc. Once again somebody is bundling the word "drugs" into one meaning, usually defined as the strongest drugs like heroin, which gives an association between lesser drugs and that situation. But its not more true to say that ectacy will lead to heroin then it is to say that alcohol will.

    So really you've advising the girls of TSR not to use heroin? Well ok, we can agree on that one!

    I do know of two individuals who were both from so called middle class families who grew up in normal,loving homes where they had both parents,siblings ,there was enough money etc. The female,her father was a land owner and farmer and laos had other businesses. She was the typical pretty blonde girl who had everything. She had too much and her young party lifestlye led her astray. She ended up being a street prostitute,hopelessly hooked on Heroin and disowned by her family as they couldnt help her and indeed, i think they feared her.

    The other,male,from the same kind of family...had a good job in banking/finance..just jumped the rails and went down hill. Drifted into Heroin addiction. Met a girl who also dabble in drugs. She sold her body for both of them and he did the occasional mugging.

    Another...male mid thirties an NHS nurse who started dipping his finger into the drugs cabinet and became hooked on opiates.
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    I think it is the fear. If caught, you may have it attached to you for life and it'll make career prospects hard. And I think bad trips will scare me for life, it's also the health aspects as well, you hear so much about overdoses and bad side affects. I don't mind marijuana but I draw the line at all other drugs. Not sure why, maybe because society is more lenient towards marijuana and I feel it's less of a danger and more accepted. Complicated.
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    (Original post by Oldernotwiser)
    I do know of two individuals who were both from so called middle class families who grew up in normal,loving homes where they had both parents,siblings ,there was enough money etc. The female,her father was a land owner and farmer and laos had other businesses. She was the typical pretty blonde girl who had everything. She had too much and her young party lifestlye led her astray. She ended up being a street prostitute,hopelessly hooked on Heroin and disowned by her family as they couldnt help her and indeed, i think they feared her.

    The other,male,from the same kind of family...had a good job in banking/finance..just jumped the rails and went down hill. Drifted into Heroin addiction. Met a girl who also dabble in drugs. She sold her body for both of them and he did the occasional mugging.

    Another...male mid thirties an NHS nurse who started dipping his finger into the drugs cabinet and became hooked on opiates.
    Well you have some shockingly unrepresentative stories there really, you can't say that this behaviour is at all usual. All addicts of drugs like heroin that I know came from very different backgrounds to most TSR users. I know dozens of student drug users who would look at you in disgust if you said that you did heroin of crack cocaine though.

    Go to Glastenbury festival and you can score most drugs in the world, but just try finding heroin or crack cocaine. They would look at you like you're mad.

    The drugs you're talking about cross a line that very very few people will ever venture across even if they do some illegal substances like marijuana or ectacy, even cocaine. Again this goes back to the point I keep saying - calling this "drugs" leads to so many misunderstandings and oversimplifications, because the word can mean a cup of tea, clearly the notion that a cup of tea leads to what you're describing would be seen as insane.
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    (Original post by Oldernotwiser)
    I do know of two individuals who were both from so called middle class families who grew up in normal,loving homes where they had both parents,siblings ,there was enough money etc. The female,her father was a land owner and farmer and laos had other businesses. She was the typical pretty blonde girl who had everything. She had too much and her young party lifestlye led her astray. She ended up being a street prostitute,hopelessly hooked on Heroin and disowned by her family as they couldnt help her and indeed, i think they feared her.

    The other,male,from the same kind of family...had a good job in banking/finance..just jumped the rails and went down hill. Drifted into Heroin addiction. Met a girl who also dabble in drugs. She sold her body for both of them and he did the occasional mugging.

    Another...male mid thirties an NHS nurse who started dipping his finger into the drugs cabinet and became hooked on opiates.
    40-50% of people below 55 have tried cannabis, 5-10% of them have tried coke or pills, and 0.2-0.3% of them have used heroin. The figures just don't add up. Those people you know who went off the rails lives would be greatly improved if drugs weren't illegal in the first place, or they could be prescribed under the NHS.
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    (Original post by CandyFlipper)
    Well you have some shockingly unrepresentative stories there really, you can't say that this behaviour is at all usual. All addicts of drugs like heroin that I know came from very different backgrounds to most TSR users. I know dozens of student drug users who would look at you in disgust if you said that you did heroin of crack cocaine though.

    Go to Glastenbury festival and you can score most drugs in the world, but just try finding heroin or crack cocaine. They would look at you like you're mad.

    The drugs you're talking about cross a line that very very few people will ever venture across even if they do some illegal substances like marijuana or ectacy, even cocaine. Again this goes back to the point I keep saying - calling this "drugs" leads to so many misunderstandings and oversimplifications, because the word can mean a cup of tea, clearly the notion that a cup of tea leads to what you're describing would be seen as insane.
    Every single person who uses heroin drank milk as a child, i'm starting to see a pattern here:excited:. I wonder what the price and purity levels of milk would be if we banned it.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    40-50% of people below 55 have tried cannabis, 5-10% of them have tried coke or pills, and 0.2-0.3% of them have used heroin. The figures just don't add up. Those people you know who went off the rails lives would be greatly improved if drugs weren't illegal in the first place, or they could be prescribed under the NHS.
    I wouldnt support the financing of drugs supply via the NHS.

    If people get themselves into these situations,they must deal with it themselves.

    There are plenty of private clinics and charitable institutions who offer free or subsidised detox.

    I dont see why the taxpayer should fund the fantasy worlds of certain individuals. They need to play as full and as equal a part in society as the rest of it and not just bluff it on drugs.
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    (Original post by Oldernotwiser)
    I wouldnt support the financing of drugs supply via the NHS.

    If people get themselves into these situations,they must deal with it themselves.

    There are plenty of private clinics and charitable institutions who offer free or subsidised detox.

    I dont see why the taxpayer should fund the fantasy worlds of certain individuals. They need to play as full and as equal a part in society as the rest of it and not just bluff it on drugs.
    I would because it has many benefits. If you supply heroin to people who are already addicted the following happens:
    1) They stop dealing to support their own habits - removing the street supply, and the people who create new users.
    2) It is far safer for the people who use to get good clean heroin, even negligable, and addicts can often hold down a decent job whilst high - it is only when their job stops supporting their habit that they leave for a life of crime.
    3) 1/3 of our prisons are full of people who have committed crimes for drugs, and a further 1/3 are there for selling the drugs. The law and order saving would run into the billions pretty quickly.
    4) The people who steal to fund their habit steal from us, and they clearly won't stop because this drug is more important to them than food. If you couldn't afford to eat you'd steal wouldn't you? This is the basic idea of the benefits system, that it is cheaper to give it to them than it is to have them take it.
    5) Insurance premiums, and crime for us would drop dramatically.
    6) It would put addicts in touch with NHS workers, who will then get them into treatment programs. As the addicts will be supplied via the NHS and not dealing any more, and the drugs won't leave the shooting clinic, it will be a lot easier to quit too as it is often the community that sucks you back down.
    7) It is not our right to tell people what they can and cannot put into their bodies, thereby creating an awful situation for those who decide to use it (who are 9/10 abuse victims, with lives so messed up we could never even contemplate). If it was outright legal they would be able to fund their habit by holding down a minimum wage job, but because people want it illegal it costs 100x that, therefore it is their responsibility to treat the symptoms of the decaying society they have created.

    All in all it seems rather odd to me that anyone can be against handing out heroin to addicts for free. It costs pennies per day per addict, and saves billions, whilst dramatically improving the quality of life for thousands of our poorest and most deprived citizens. Even if you are against it on principle you would have to be a fool to not understand the financial and societal sense it makes.
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    Well its good to deabte but on point 7 post no #189..

    Yes , in a free and democratic society,which we almost have,people should be able do do what they want within certain parameters.

    Those parameters are mostly clearly set out in the civil and criminal law and are also affected by what is socially acceptable.

    There is much talk of freedom of choice but no mention of responsibility. you cannot make free choices which may be harmful or detrimental without also taking on board responsibility for your choice.

    Like it or not,drug taking is not a socially acceptable activity for the vast majority of us in UK plc and it certainly isnt acceptable for those who own and/or control the means of employment and production.

    For example,my own company has a drugs testing policy. If you are suspected of being under the influence of a substance OR you have an accident at work,you can be REQUIRED to attend a drug test within 4 hours and non attendance will be a presumption of guilt.

    If i were an employer,i wouldnt employ anyone who needed alcohol/weed/heroin/coke or any other similar aubstance just to operate.

    As for crime..build more jails and jail them. It will bring some discipline and order to their otherwise chaotic lives.
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    (Original post by Oldernotwiser)
    Well its good to deabte but on point 7 post no #189..

    Yes , in a free and democratic society,which we almost have,people should be able do do what they want within certain parameters.

    Those parameters are mostly clearly set out in the civil and criminal law and are also affected by what is socially acceptable.

    There is much talk of freedom of choice but no mention of responsibility. you cannot make free choices which may be harmful or detrimental without also taking on board responsibility for your choice.

    Like it or not,drug taking is not a socially acceptable activity for the vast majority of us in UK plc and it certainly isnt acceptable for those who own and/or control the means of employment and production.

    For example,my own company has a drugs testing policy. If you are suspected of being under the influence of a substance OR you have an accident at work,you can be REQUIRED to attend a drug test within 4 hours and non attendance will be a presumption of guilt.

    If i were an employer,i wouldnt employ anyone who needed alcohol/weed/heroin/coke or any other similar aubstance just to operate.

    As for crime..build more jails and jail them. It will bring some discipline and order to their otherwise chaotic lives.
    You are essentially saying the don't get the rights, but all of the responsibility. Jailing is not an effective detterent, as America has proven time and again - they have the largest prison population and the highest rates of crime of any civilised country. They use more drugs than anywhere in the world too. Your methods of dealing with a social problem are entirely out dated and completely defunct. My methods on the other hand have numerous examples of improvements in quality of life for addicts and those around them, as well as for the general tax payer. If I employ people I will judge them on the quality of the work they do, rather than the drugs they use/have used - but that's just me, I want the best workers is all.
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    (Original post by Oldernotwiser)
    I wouldnt support the financing of drugs supply via the NHS.

    If people get themselves into these situations,they must deal with it themselves.

    There are plenty of private clinics and charitable institutions who offer free or subsidised detox.

    I dont see why the taxpayer should fund the fantasy worlds of certain individuals. They need to play as full and as equal a part in society as the rest of it and not just bluff it on drugs.
    It's cheaper and more effective than financing their stay in prison.
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    because i ran out
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    drugs is bad for you kid.
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    (Original post by bengalisoldier)
    drugs is bad for you kid.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNbExvU42q4
    mmkay?
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    Reason?: Erm... Never tried it? Same goes for alcahol. I did smoke a few times in school though. Even after all this, I'm still pretty hard and no softie... People get suprised when I tell em I don't get high or get smashed on a friday.
 
 
 
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