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    (Original post by Popat21)
    I hope so! I was talking to my Lit teacher today and she said that the only topic that hadn't come up for Section B was destination. I pray to God it doesn't come up.
    What is destination? Isn't that like end product or something? or am I missing something? I have never heard of this topic. I'm thinking it's something similair to endings, which came up last year..... Or is it purpose or something? please enlighten me cause I'm panicing!! one topic I haven't revised at all.:confused:
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    (Original post by TWF)
    What is destination? Isn't that like end product or something? or am I missing something? I have never heard of this topic. I'm thinking it's something similair to endings, which came up last year..... Or is it purpose or something? please enlighten me cause I'm panicing!! one topic I haven't revised at all.:confused:
    Yeah, I think that's what it is. I'm unclear on its meaning also which is why I don't want it to come up :/
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    Best way to tackle section A)B) - is to first determine whether you agree/disagee with the statement. Then you have to pick some textual evidence which supports your argument. You kinda have to take a holistic approach to the question - consider why different people will have different interpretations. Try to specifically include "in light of a feminist/marxist/religious/psychoanalytical reading, readers may be guided to the conclusion....." then evaluate, why that particular reading would be the best one. Make subtle links to your context throughout - some questions you'll find it easy, others you wont. Providing - you have a decent focus on the task/explore the strengths and weaknesses of different interpretations + link to context - you should get at least 14/15.

    Hope that helped mate!
    Brilliant! Post like that should be made available to every English Lit. student in the land! Thanks
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    Yeah, I think that's what it is. I'm unclear on its meaning also which is why I don't want it to come up :/
    I emailed my my Lit teacher, and asked her about destination. She basically replied:

    "From what I can gather it's just a way of looking at the narrative methods used in a text and using these to inform a wider interpretation of the text. It's linking all the AO's together AO2, AO3 and AO4. For this reason I can't see a question coming up on 'destination' because the AOs are kept separate."

    For section B - i think they'll give us an open question, but remember you can always manipulate those type of questions. My teacher assumes they'll do something like "write about something you find particularly striking across three texts you have studied" - to which you could just write "A striking narrative method across three texts, is their manipulation of symbolism "

    Be open minded - whatever the question, just apply it to the texts - and write like you've never wrote before!
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    WAIT WHAT? You have nothing for setting on Auden/Rossetti? Let me sort this out.

    GOBLIN MARKET

    - Parallel world, common market yet has goblins adding to the fairytale aspect. Link this to Rossetti’s intended form/audience
    - Universal countryside to make message universal
    - Lack of men suggests they are not needed, link to Lizzie saving Laura

    COUSIN KATE
    - Typical rural setting reinforces the idea that this could happen to everyone

    1st SEPT
    - Dive bar on 52nd street – detached and away from the war enabling open minding
    - America was in its isolationist period/phase
    - Cannot escape the war with jazz music (this was a by-product of WW1)
    - Athens was the birthplace of democracy and lost this for a while acting as a warning to the reader to learn from past mistakes
    - Everybody knows New York City so it is a universal setting, especially as it is a capital of the world etc.

    I DON'T WANT SYMBOLISM. I WILL CRY.
    FAANKS, POPAT! Just come do my paper, k?

    ACTUALLY, NEITHER DO I NOW. Just realized that while I have lots of symbolism for Kite Runner and a little bit for Rossetti, I has nothing for Auden D: RIGHT, WHY CAN'T THEY JUST PRODUCE A LIST OF POSSIBILITIES? There's literally anything they could ask D: Well, bar what they have already! ...Or is there a list I don't know about? :|
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    (Original post by esachica)
    I very much enjoyed your ramble! Thanks so much! I don't see how you won't get a really good grade! Have you got any more stuff on Chapter 6 for Gatsby? I don't seem to have much, annoyingly -_-
    LOL - if only you were an examiner

    Got my notes - for chapter 6 before i start rambling again, remember you need to have a pretty sharp focus. A common mistake alot of us make is - try and adress every narrative method (setting, openings, narrative voice, characters, time blah blah blah) - pick the 'salient' features. But for the whole chapter - this is what i have:

    - Flashback - provides a backstory, deepens readers understanding on Gatsby's character - then go further - structurally: just before chapter 7 and the real action takes place. Without the backstory, would we really feel the same way about Gatsby? Would we like him?
    - "Sprang from his platonic conception of himself" - 'sprang' shows progession, 'platonic' and 'conception' are oxymoronic, contradict eachother.
    - Gatsby talks about that whole "you cant turn back time" "why of course you can" - i kinda think the guy's deluded, but he has dreams, so gotta give him props!
    - Fitzgerald explores social class through the way he describes the 'sloanes'.

    All i have
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    LOL - if only you were an examiner

    Got my notes - for chapter 6 before i start rambling again, remember you need to have a pretty sharp focus. A common mistake alot of us make is - try and adress every narrative method (setting, openings, narrative voice, characters, time blah blah blah) - pick the 'salient' features. But for the whole chapter - this is what i have:

    - Flashback - provides a backstory, deepens readers understanding on Gatsby's character - then go further - structurally: just before chapter 7 and the real action takes place. Without the backstory, would we really feel the same way about Gatsby? Would we like him?
    - "Sprang from his platonic conception of himself" - 'sprang' shows progession, 'platonic' and 'conception' are oxymoronic, contradict eachother.
    - Gatsby talks about that whole "you cant turn back time" "why of course you can" - i kinda think the guy's deluded, but he has dreams, so gotta give him props!
    - Fitzgerald explores social class through the way he describes the 'sloanes'.

    All i have
    Right, not feeling that TSR won't let me Rep you -_- Thanks so much! I get the feeling I'll come crawling to you for more help, just a warning! XD
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    Yeah, I think that's what it is. I'm unclear on its meaning also which is why I don't want it to come up :/
    Just had a discussion with my Elit teacher, and he kind of agrees with me but only cautiously.... I stressed that destinations is basically endings and he agreed, so yeah, it might not come up. He told me to revise it anyway, just in case..... Endings came up last year.
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    Any ideas for themes within the pied piper of hamelin? (Browning)

    I vaguely know what they are but cannot for the life of me work out simple ways to sum them up
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Just had a discussion with my Elit teacher, and he kind of agrees with me but only cautiously.... I stressed that destinations is basically endings and he agreed, so yeah, it might not come up. He told me to revise it anyway, just in case..... Endings came up last year.
    If we're talking about destinations, my teacher said this morning she believed it to be what journey we are taken on through the text and how, aswell as the overall message. So uh yeah. Confusing :|
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    (Original post by esachica)
    FAANKS, POPAT! Just come do my paper, k?

    ACTUALLY, NEITHER DO I NOW. Just realized that while I have lots of symbolism for Kite Runner and a little bit for Rossetti, I has nothing for Auden D: RIGHT, WHY CAN'T THEY JUST PRODUCE A LIST OF POSSIBILITIES? There's literally anything they could ask D: Well, bar what they have already! ...Or is there a list I don't know about? :|
    You can come and do my paper!
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    (Original post by Popat21)
    You can come and do my paper!
    ONIT! ...An E cool with you?
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Just had a discussion with my Elit teacher, and he kind of agrees with me but only cautiously.... I stressed that destinations is basically endings and he agreed, so yeah, it might not come up. He told me to revise it anyway, just in case..... Endings came up last year.
    They could ask the question 'How do the authors create their intended destination in the texts you have studied?'. I think is quite different to endings, I see destination as 'morals/messages etc'. For example you could talk about how in the kite runner Hosseini challenges the stereotype that good aesthetics correlates to good nature, as all the purest characters have deformities of some sort. When Amir finally redeems himself he is beaten nearly beyond recognition by Assef; when his natures changes from good to bad, his appearance does the opposite.
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    How much are you all able to write for each question, out of curiosity? Of normal, A4 paper that is?

    And how are we all feeling about the exam? I'm veryyyy scared. Terrified, even.
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    (Original post by OneInSolidarity)
    They could ask the question 'How do the authors create their intended destination in the texts you have studied?'. I think is quite different to endings, I see destination as 'morals/messages etc'. For example you could talk about how in the kite runner Hosseini challenges the stereotype that good aesthetics correlates to good nature, as all the purest characters have deformities of some sort. When Amir finally redeems himself he is beaten nearly beyond recognition by Assef; when his natures changes from good to bad, his appearance does the opposite.
    :confused:I'm super confused now because what you mentioned is pretty much what I have in my Kite Runner ''endings'' notes. ''How do writers create endings in the text'', you basically talk about what made Amir reach that ending (destination). I've heard my teacher speak about journeys, I think that is definetely more specific and easier to understand. I think destination could be a combination of journeys and ending. But then again, I find myself making very similair points when talking about how writers ''create'' endings. ''Create'' basically refers to something similair to ''journey'' as in how he gets to the conclusion in the ending.... but probably also more specifically to how he constructs the narrative in the ending.

    (Original post by esachica)
    If we're talking about destinations, my teacher said this morning she believed it to be what journey we are taken on through the text and how, aswell as the overall message. So uh yeah. Confusing :|
    Indeed... when you talk about endings, you also end up talking about the intended symbolical message and stuff. It's super confusing, different teachers will have different opinions I guess.... I'll avoid destinations and concentrate on the others.
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    (Original post by esachica)
    How much are you all able to write for each question, out of curiosity? Of normal, A4 paper that is?

    And how are we all feeling about the exam? I'm veryyyy scared. Terrified, even.
    I have average size writing and I can only bang out a page and a half for section A questions, section B is about 3 pages?

    I'm absolutely crappin' myself - very attractive...
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    I have average size writing and I can only bang out a page and a half for section A questions, section B is about 3 pages?

    I'm absolutely crappin' myself - very attractive...
    Yeah Section A questions for me I can only do about a page and a half :| But section B I'm sort of avoiding practising with the knowledge that I KNOW I SHALL DO BAD.

    SO LIKE I SAID, TERRIFIED
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    (Original post by esachica)
    Yeah Section A questions for me I can only do about a page and a half :| But section B I'm sort of avoiding practising with the knowledge that I KNOW I SHALL DO BAD.

    SO LIKE I SAID, TERRIFIED
    Remember you only need like 44/84 for a B in the exam, which breaks down to 11/21 (ai) 11/21 (aii) and 22/42 (b) - which grade wise is C C D. To get into band 4, jus commenting on specific aspects will be enough, I jus need to explore and evaluate to get higher than my previous 44 - easier said than done

    Have you got any notes and quotes for symbolism in kite runner and gatsby?
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Just had a discussion with my Elit teacher, and he kind of agrees with me but only cautiously.... I stressed that destinations is basically endings and he agreed, so yeah, it might not come up. He told me to revise it anyway, just in case..... Endings came up last year.
    Ah yes, I remember endings coming up last year! I'll revise it just in case.

    (Original post by esachica)
    ONIT! ...An E cool with you?
    Like you'll get an E, I'm sure we'll all be fine
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    (Original post by thefirstnotlastsamurai)
    Remember you only need like 44/84 for a B in the exam, which breaks down to 11/21 (ai) 11/21 (aii) and 22/42 (b) - which grade wise is C C D. To get into band 4, jus commenting on specific aspects will be enough, I jus need to explore and evaluate to get higher than my previous 44 - easier said than done

    Have you got any notes and quotes for symbolism in kite runner and gatsby?
    See, that makes it all sound quite nice I only want a blooming C. I got 60 or something in coursework, which I think works out that I need a D in this exam which will get me a C overall. Of course I'd love to do better...but I'm aiming low! XD

    Ah yes! For Kite Runner:

    Spoiler:
    Show

    The Slingshot:
    As a reoccurring symbol in The Kite Runner, the slingshot represents loyalty in the hands of those who use it to defend the innocent from injustice. In the course of the novel, it is seen not simply as a play toy, but as a weapon that acts to repress evil and enforce good. An evident example of this is Hassan’s use of the slingshot. As childhood friends in Kabul, Amir and Hassan are often harassed by Assef and his gang just as the other children of Kabul are. In one particular incident, Assef’s encounter with Amir and Hassan turns violent when he attempts to beat Amir for his open disloyalty to Afghanistan by taking a Hazara for a friend. However, Hassan prepares his slingshot and threatens to shoot Assef’s left eye. Hassan’s courageous stand saves them both from trouble for now. This symbol reoccurs much later in the novel, when Sohrab interrupts the fight between Amir and Assef, as he pulls out his slingshot and pleads Assef to end his assault on Amir. Sohrab’s actions demonstrate an extreme courage for a young, exploited servant.

    The Kite
    As the trophy of the kite-flying tournament, the kite can explain the unique characteristics of each individual in relation to itself, so its symbol takes on a dual meaning--one for Amir and one for Hassan. For instance Amir, especially as a child, is perpetually in pursuit of Baba’s affections. Without a mother, Amir only has Baba to look up to as a role model and so it is his sole mission to gain recognition from Baba, who seemingly has too many expectations from a mere child. Thus, to Amir the kite symbolizes the key to winning Baba’s heart. On the other hand, the kite to Hassan symbolizes the friendship and loyalty he feels towards Amir. Therefore, when confronted by Assef and his gang in the alleyway, he fears losing the kite to Assef would jeopardize that friendship and so submits to Assef’s brutality. Evidently, the motives behind both Amir and Hassan’s decisions are meant to achieve the opposite ends. This discrepancy represents the difference between two general people: the selfish and the righteous.

    The Brass Knuckles:
    As a growing boy, Assef is notorious for his cruelty to other kids. The brass knuckles he is well known for wielding is a symbol of fear in the hearts of the youngsters of Kabul. Assef’s instincts are to commit the crimes he does, but he also faces the demands of structure in society. However, Assef’s view of a favourable future is one full of crime. Thus, he preserves himself by surrounding himself with those who share his outlook, thereby maintaining his power and status in Kabul.

    There is also the pomegranate tree which is quite an interesting one to look into



    I'll get back to you about Gatsby, supposed to be writing a Chapter 8 essay! Also, do you know how to specifically hit the 'form' aspect of language, form and structure?
 
 
 
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