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How much do you pay your parents a month? Watch

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    I don't live at home, but I plan to start giving them money monthly, both my brothers already do. I personally think it's part of becoming an adult where you're able to start taking care of your parents.

    At one point my brother used to give all of his wages to my parents when he lived at home.
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    i am paying to my parents......only 250 £ per month.
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    i moved back home when i finished uni, and i dont have a job yet (had a temp thing for a while) but iv never and probably wont ever pay rent, not because i wouldnt but because my parents would never ask me to.
    there not in the position where they would need the money if they did of course they would ask and i would willingly pay it , but were not in that position
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    My Mum said she would charge me £50 per month if I decided to live at home. This is if I was working.
    As a student my Mum would not expect me to pay rent. She would just expect me to help out around the house, cooking, cleaning, washing etc.
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    my parents aren't desperate for some token amount of money, so i don't pay rent.
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    My parents aren't going to charge me to live at home during the holidays but if I decided to move back home during term time, then they said they would ask for maybe £100 per month. I think this is fair seeing as you get given a maintenance loan even if you live at home.
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    I used to pay my mum £100 a month plus I'd top up the electricity meter a couple of times a week or so. And that was in year 11-12.
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    how every much they used to get in child tax credits
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    I don't pay rent (I'm 18, have a part time job, doing A-levels), and neither does my brother (20, at uni, never had a job, can't get one during termtime cos he's at Oxford). I think that's fair enough because in my case, I'm still in full-time education, and while I don't pay rent, I pay for lots of stuff myself (whereas before I had a job, my parents would give me some money for clothes, going out etc.). They have tried to encourage my brother to get a job but got nowhere and didn't force it. I think it's fair though, since they fully support him (and me next year) in going to uni etc. etc. They encourage me to save my wages for uni/the future, which I do, and I think they'd rather I did that than gave it to them when they don't really need the money.

    If I had a full-time job, though, I would expect to pay something towards the household - we don't have a mortgage, so not for that, but more towards food bills, utilities etc. Yes, I'm their child and they love me etc. etc. but if you were living with your spouse, just because you love them doesn't mean you would expect to pick up the bill for everything when they have a full-time job....
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    (Original post by plimsolls)
    my parents aren't desperate for some token amount of money, so i don't pay rent.
    Lucky for you. Unfortunately to some people, £50 is a lot of money, and some peoples parents cant afford to endlessly prop up their grown up children.
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    my brother is 23 in a full time job and pays nothing. i'm sure your parents wont be expecting that much money from you
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    Nothing, but I do chip in when they're paying bills and food shopping etc.
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    (Original post by Freier._.lance)
    I don't live at home, but I plan to start giving them money monthly, both my brothers already do. I personally think it's part of becoming an adult where you're able to start taking care of your parents.

    At one point my brother used to give all of his wages to my parents when he lived at home.
    I agree with this. Parents aren't just there to take from - the idea is you give something back as well. Although I doubt I'd ever give my parents money unless I had a lot and they were in financial difficulty, when I finish university and start earning (hopefully) more than I need to live a comfortable life, I will start saving money for my parents' care when they're elderly, whether that be any private health care they might need or putting them in a care home. I would only resort to putting them in a care home if they need 24/7 care. If they don't need to be looked after that much at all, I plan on having my parents or one of them to live in my own home, and I wouldn't expect them to pay for that. I would be glad to look after them.
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    (Original post by eyre2)
    my brother is 23 in a full time job and pays nothing. i'm sure your parents wont be expecting that much money from you
    It's not always a case of 'expecting' money, it's just a case of offering it because you feel that's the right thing to do.
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    my mommy pays me £80 to stay at home my dad would probably slap me if i tried paying him.
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    I used to pay £300 a month, even though I only earnt £320...

    I think that was far too extortionate though.
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    Me and one of my sisters pay £20 a week, the reason my other sister doesn't is because she is still in school and they still get child benefit for her. Also she doesn't have a job, and they wouldn't ask for money if we didn't have it.

    I disagree that people who pay rent to their parents don't get much freedom, at 19 I'm not really "controlled" anymore. They don't stop me going out and getting drunk, and have no problems with me stumbling in at 2/3/4/8am from a night out. I don't "get high" so that part doesn't bother me. Also if I had a boyfriend they would let me have sex with him in my room, of course not in front of them but if I was living with friends I wouldn't have sex in front of them either.

    And even for parents who are more controlling, you still get the roof over your head, food bought for you etc. If you don't think what you pay is worth it then you could always move out and pay the higher rent for more freedom.
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    My brother pays £210 each month, so I guess that's fair since he's still in education and stuff.

    Thank God I'm still young, if I were to pay rent to my parents, I would have been kicked out from not being able to pay for it. D:
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    Back home in Northern Ireland we don't call it rent as such, it's referred to as 'housekeeping'. It makes it sound less like a formal payment of living there and more like helping out with the things that are done for you around the house. The general consensus with my family and the people I know are that as soon as you leave full-time education and enter an adequately paid job, then you start contributing to the running of the house. I've never considered it to be paying to live at home, more like paying for the electricity I use and food I eat. During my gap year I had a full-time job and I was perfectly happy to be handing money over for the upkeep (£150 per month). I think it's perfectly reasonable that when you start earning a wage and continue to live at home that you contribute to the house financially as well as doing your share of cleaning/cooking etc.
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    (Original post by Rascacielos)
    I agree with this. Parents aren't just there to take from - the idea is you give something back as well. Although I doubt I'd ever give my parents money unless I had a lot and they were in financial difficulty, when I finish university and start earning (hopefully) more than I need to live a comfortable life, I will start saving money for my parents' care when they're elderly, whether that be any private health care they might need or putting them in a care home. I would only resort to putting them in a care home if they need 24/7 care. If they don't need to be looked after that much at all, I plan on having my parents or one of them to live in my own home, and I wouldn't expect them to pay for that. I would be glad to look after them.
    I absolutely agree! Though I find this mentality difficult to find nowadays.
 
 
 
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