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I want to be a writer: How can I stand out? Watch

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    (Original post by Doke)
    Thanks. A lot of people have given similar advice: i.e., how to write well. This helpful to the extent that I think more about what it is that I am writing. However, it doesn't make a huge difference if no one's reading it. How do I get the right people to be reading my work? Where do I find the people who can help me further a career? I understand that right now I won't have as much luck as, say, when I'm at University when I'm meeting more influential, professional people, but I want to start doing everything I can as soon as possible.
    You should aim to procure at least two addictions and hitchhike a continent. I can offer you no sweeter advice.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    You should aim to procure at least two addictions and hitchhike a continent. I can offer you no sweeter advice.
    Ha ha! That's pretty excellent, actually. Not for production and distribution purposes, but sounds like fun. I've got a few addictions going already ... they're pretty innocent, though; tea, mainly. The hitchhiking thing might be a little more difficult, I fear. xD
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    (Original post by Doke)
    I'm so sorry, you subscribed and then all posts immediately stopped xD
    Maybe this will bump it up for both of us te he he x
    Well the info here is valuable already
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    (Original post by DontWantYourBloodMoney)
    Well the info here is valuable already
    That is very true ^.^
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    (Original post by DontWantYourBloodMoney)
    Well the info here is valuable already
    Ha ha, if only it would continue...
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    Apologies if it's been mentioned already but Duotrope's Digest is a useful resource for writers. It's one of the most comprehensive directories of print and online journals around and you can search by genre, too.
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    Apologies if it's been mentioned already but Duotrope's Digest is a useful resource for writers. It's one of the most comprehensive directories of print and online journals around and you can search by genre, too.
    Cheers. If it has been mentioned, then I've forgotten it. I'll check it out now. It certainly sounds helpful x
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    Apologies if it's been mentioned already but Duotrope's Digest is a useful resource for writers. It's one of the most comprehensive directories of print and online journals around and you can search by genre, too.
    I was just browising it and hovering over symbols and I noticed that it offers information about payment from magazines in US currency. Is this is an exclusively US-based publication? Do you know? Because that would be less helpful... Still relevant, but ... just less so.

    Thanks x
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)
    There are several things you need to do, all of which depend on where you want to go. Do you want to write novels? Biographies? Opinion pieces? News articles?


    Here's what you need to do:
    - Gain a sense of unwarrented self-importance. You need this as a writer. You have to believe that everyone wants to know what you think.
    - Be negative in your approach. People in this country like to read about people who fail and things that suck. Even if someone has spent a lot of time and effort on something, they suck and they fail, and your readers need to know how and why.
    - You must develop a very sarcastic and scornful sense of humour where you are able to imply that what ever you are writing about is so incredibly far beneath you that you wouldn't be writing about it if it wasn't your job.
    - From now on you can't enjoy anything. Everything is crap.
    - Hind sight is 20/20 - always remember that. When someone cocks up, use the knowledge of how and why to tell your readers what an idiot they are, and what a far superior being like yourself would have done in those circumstances.
    - Put your own spin on everything. Don't just report the facts, people want to know what to think about it too, and remember, everything sucks and everyone fails.
    - Never ever try or attempt to do the very things that you are writing about. Doing so would mean that you are on a level with the person that you are criticising, and as a writer, you can't have that.


    Hope this helps
    This reminds me of the guy from Faulks' A Week in December...Tranter?
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    (Original post by Doke)
    I was just browising it and hovering over symbols and I noticed that it offers information about payment from magazines in US currency. Is this is an exclusively US-based publication? Do you know? Because that would be less helpful... Still relevant, but ... just less so.

    Thanks x
    They list journals from all over the world, including the UK. If you click on 'show more options' you can filter results by country.

    Don't worry too much about the payscale being in dollars, I've only taken notice of that to get an indication of how much I might get paid for a piece.
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    put a massive pair of tits on the front cover of your book, then you'll stand out in waterstones.
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    Reputable agents do not ask for money up-front. They get a percentage of whatever deal they get you. As such, the best way to stand out is to do what you do best - write. Write a novel. Edit, edit, edit. Polish it. When it's ready (and only then) begin researching agents. Google is your friend. Find the ones that are particularly interested in your genre. Many of them will have websites where you can find out if they're currently accepting unsolicited submissions and how/what to send.

    Some people send directly to publishing houses but I'm not too fond of that option. It's much harder to get someone from there to read your work whereas agents are usually on the lookout for "fresh blood". Agents also have numerous connections in the business so they can place your work faster. Plus, it's in their best interest to get you the absolute best deal possible.

    Be warned that this is a long process and there are no guarantees. Do consider a day job. I read somewhere that a very small percentage of writers (around 5%) actually make a living out of writing. I'm not saying you can't be in that 5%. I'm just saying that having a back-up plan can't hurt.

    On a lighter note, check out NaNoWriMo. It's a fun contest held every November with the goal of writing a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. The community is great and it's a good writing exercise. There is also a list of authors who have eventually been published so it can definitely be a push in the right direction.

    Good luck!
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    Only a very small part of being a successful writer is anything to do with being able to write. The most important thing is whether or not you actually have something intelligent and original to say in the first place. The simple truth of the matter is that most people don't.
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    (Original post by tigermoth99)
    They list journals from all over the world, including the UK. If you click on 'show more options' you can filter results by country.

    Don't worry too much about the payscale being in dollars, I've only taken notice of that to get an indication of how much I might get paid for a piece.
    Thanks, that's excellent
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    (Original post by Kafka Kangaroo)
    Reputable agents do not ask for money up-front. They get a percentage of whatever deal they get you. As such, the best way to stand out is to do what you do best - write. Write a novel. Edit, edit, edit. Polish it. When it's ready (and only then) begin researching agents. Google is your friend. Find the ones that are particularly interested in your genre. Many of them will have websites where you can find out if they're currently accepting unsolicited submissions and how/what to send.

    Some people send directly to publishing houses but I'm not too fond of that option. It's much harder to get someone from there to read your work whereas agents are usually on the lookout for "fresh blood". Agents also have numerous connections in the business so they can place your work faster. Plus, it's in their best interest to get you the absolute best deal possible.

    Be warned that this is a long process and there are no guarantees. Do consider a day job. I read somewhere that a very small percentage of writers (around 5%) actually make a living out of writing. I'm not saying you can't be in that 5%. I'm just saying that having a back-up plan can't hurt.

    On a lighter note, check out NaNoWriMo. It's a fun contest held every November with the goal of writing a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. The community is great and it's a good writing exercise. There is also a list of authors who have eventually been published so it can definitely be a push in the right direction.

    Good luck!
    Cheers. I totally understand what you've said - I never expected it to be easy and your advice is helpful.

    I vaguely remember hearing about that competition but have never really considered entering. Maybe one day

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Lykaios~)
    If an agent wants you to pay them before they've got your book published, run quickly. As far as I know, all legitimate literary agents only get paid afterwards, and earn commission from your royalties. etc.

    Also, that book (web: http://www.writersandartists.co.uk) is brilliant. One is released every year and it contains every legitimate agent and publisher in the country (and some outside, I think, not sure though?) with their contact details. So if they're not in that book, they are not legitimate.
    I this was posted a while ago, but I finally got round to checking out this website properly (I've had a cursory glance previously) and it really is AMAZING. I actually can't thank you enough, this is definitely going to help loads!
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    (Original post by Doke)
    My main aspiration in life is to be a professional writer, hopefully at a good enough level that I might earn a decent income from my efforts. As far as education and personal involvement goes, I believe that I am heading in the right direction and, hopefully, am not doing anything to detract from my goals. I am taking subjects that I have been informed are relevant (aside from the obvious English Language and Literature, I am also studying Media Studies and Philosophy and Ethics) and I am applying in 2011 to study Creative Writing at a number of universities that, after much research, I have determined to have courses suited to my tastes in the area. I write a lot in my free time to hone my skills so that if the time comes that I might offer my work professionally, I will have developed my talent to an appropriate level. I mostly write fiction and have made considerable advances over the past decade in my abilities in terms of style and detail. I hope that I will be able to one day earn a living from this as it is something that I love and do so very much.

    However, I am aware to the point of crippling fear that the entertainment industry is very competitive and, if anyone can help me, I would like to have some idea of more ways in which I can be noticed as a writer. I know fully that writing alone when all of my work stays on my memory stick where no one will see it will never be particularly fruitful, no matter how much I practice or how good (or otherwise ) my work might be.

    I have been advised that I should write a blog, and I am in the process of looking into this option, but the vast number of blogging sites available make it hugely confusing. I want to stand out and not just be another random blogger with no readers.

    Realistically, what can I do to make me stand out more? Is there anything I can do to catch the attention of people who can really make a difference for me in this regard?

    Thank you in advance for any help you have to offer, as well as apologies for my long-winded request. I just like to make sure I've covered everything that I do not cause confusion.

    Doke x

    P.S., I am aware that this thread is also in another part of the website, but I accidentally posted it in the wrong area and will not try to make any excuses for my mistake.
    Write for my political blog http://the-pryer.co.uk
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    (Original post by Don John)
    Write for my political blog http://the-pryer.co.uk
    Is this a genuine offer? Ha ha!
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    (Original post by Doke)
    Is this a genuine offer? Ha ha!
    Yes. Check out the 'Join us' tab, and email me a CV
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    (Original post by Don John)
    Yes. Check out the 'Join us' tab, and email me a CV
    Coolio. Got any hints for things that'll make me look good on the CV? Te he he.
 
 
 
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