Countries you were disappointed about Watch

ChessMister
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#181
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#181
(Original post by Linweth)
Being British doesn't give you the right to a seat you know, lol.
when did this happen
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lazyswot
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#182
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#182
(Original post by tokoyo-chan)
for example, you get a sentence if you kill somebody who tries to kill you. where is the logic? it's either you or the guy/girl, so obviously to defend yourself, your instinct is gonna do its own thing. also the fact that under-16s get no sentence for commiting a crime. what's the difference? 16-year old murderers are still only people.
also animals are treated like crap, which is an issue in many countries, including mine. but in France or Italy it does not seem to be an issue as much and why? because dogs are at least allowed into shopping malls and people don't see them waiting in front of the entrance. it might not seem so obvious at first, but in peoples minds, at that moment when they see that dog, an idea is being created that dogs are not good/clean enough and they are not as important as humans to be allowed in the shop. this is all happening unconsciously though so as I said, it will not seem so obvious. this results in people thinking that they can do to dogs whatever they want.
this all is just my opinion but i'm hoping to change this law after I graduate from vet school
I don't know if you get a sentence if you kill someone in self defence, but I imagine there would be a reduced sentence. Not murder, maybe manslaughter, as long as you can show your life was in danger at the time.

Under 16s do get a sentence for committing a crime. They might not go to the main prison with adults, but go to a juvenile facility, but if they have committed a serious crime they will be punished. There were two boys who killed a little boy when they were 11 or 12 and they went to prison until they were at least 18, and rehabilitated. For most crimes, anyone over the age of 11 can be sentenced, although in some cases they might be given a chance, like a slightly lesser sentence if they had no previous convictions, were obviously sorry etc.

And I don't know how on earth you got the idea that animals are treated badly in Britain. There are laws against treating animals badly, and the vast majority of people love their animals like they are one of the family. Dogs are not allowed in many shops, unless they are guide dogs, but that is because they are big, loud, take up space, can knock things off shelves etc, and are unhygienic in certain types of shops. When it comes down to it, there is no reason why they should be allowed in a shop when there is no guarantee that all dogs will be well-behaved. It depends how well they've been trained. But I don't think acknowledging the fact that dogs are, in fact, animals, in any way gives people the impression that they can treat them the way they like.

Basically, where did you get all these ideas about Britain from? Did you just read the Daily Mail while you were there or something? Cos they all seem very strange and rather uninformed, rather like the Daily Mail lol
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Noor3000
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#183
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#183
Dubai and Beirut.
Big disappointment
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ConnorB
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#184
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#184
Northern Ireland.
Walk on some granite, cross a rope-bridge, get drunk on Guinness.
And try not to get stabbed once they realise you have a Catholic name!
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brabzzz
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#185
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#185
Vietnam (no, actually, i HATED the place :-) and Costa Rica (relative to its neighbors)
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FormerlyHistoryStudent
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#186
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#186
(Original post by rockrunride)
Having said that I don't approve at British distaste for lack of tea in Paris. French people (in fact all people that aren't acquainted with Britain) don't really know what black tea with milk is and trying to order it in a café is just :facepalm2: and means that tbh not only should you not really be in Paris, you shouldn't be abroad at all.

Take your teapot if you must, but don't bring it out in public!
Well I wouldn't go so far as to say they shouldn't be abroad at all, but I do think that complaining about there being no British-style tea does indicate to me a lack of something. Not saying that everyone who tries to order that kind of tea does this, but in some cases a person will insist on ordering British-style tea, eats at fast-food restaurants or at English pubs almost exclusively, complains if a certain dish is done differently to how it is in Britain, etc., and to me that shows a huge unappreciation of local food and customs. Local people probably look on, thinking 'typical British person, unwilling to try anything different'...

If you're in a country or continent long term then I can understand someone beginning to crave something they love if it's not available there (for example, if you're in India for a long time then you may start craving beef stew), but I can't help but feel a bit disappointed in people who go on holiday to Spain for example for a week or two and have stuffed their suitcases with baked beans, teabags, ketchup, rich tea biscuits and many other British foodstuffs, because they can't bear to be away from the familiar for even a fortnight. I have to admit, when I went round the world I did pack two packets of Morrisons value custard powder, because I thought it might be nice to discover them if I fancied a late night snack in a youth hostel or something, but that's all. As it happened, I completely forgot I even had them all the way through Asia, and only remembered when I arrived in Australia and the signs in Immigration about declaring certain foodstuffs jolted my memory.
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renjie
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#187
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#187
the UK. because of people like you.
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rockrunride
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#188
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#188
(Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)
Well I wouldn't go so far as to say they shouldn't be abroad at all, but I do think that complaining about there being no British-style tea does indicate to me a lack of something. Not saying that everyone who tries to order that kind of tea does this, but in some cases a person will insist on ordering British-style tea, eats at fast-food restaurants or at English pubs almost exclusively, complains if a certain dish is done differently to how it is in Britain, etc., and to me that shows a huge unappreciation of local food and customs. Local people probably look on, thinking 'typical British person, unwilling to try anything different'...

If you're in a country or continent long term then I can understand someone beginning to crave something they love if it's not available there (for example, if you're in India for a long time then you may start craving beef stew), but I can't help but feel a bit disappointed in people who go on holiday to Spain for example for a week or two and have stuffed their suitcases with baked beans, teabags, ketchup, rich tea biscuits and many other British foodstuffs, because they can't bear to be away from the familiar for even a fortnight. I have to admit, when I went round the world I did pack two packets of Morrisons value custard powder, because I thought it might be nice to discover them if I fancied a late night snack in a youth hostel or something, but that's all. As it happened, I completely forgot I even had them all the way through Asia, and only remembered when I arrived in Australia and the signs in Immigration about declaring certain foodstuffs jolted my memory.
Summer/wintersun holidays are slightly different to going to say Paris or other associated cities. In Spain the package holiday Brits are after the sun, sand and music, therefore cafés will more than likely have British stuff because from a business point of view, the locals can really cash in on the holidaymakers. I'm disappointed by that attitude to travelling but when it's there, I'd have no complaints about tourists buying that sort of stuff. In Paris, Amsterdam or wherever, people go for sights and culture and to even think about ordering tea there is a bit of a deer-in-the-headlights moment. I mean, if it's there, fine! If it's chiefly British, live without it! I haven't seen a baked bean in absolutely ages.

I'm the same. My mum gave me a jar of Marmite at Christmas because I work quickly through them at home (less so at uni). There's still some left in there. Also for me a cup of tea is a social thing. Got a box of teabags at Christmas and (probably because there's no kettle here) I've hardly used any of them, yet one of the first things I did when I got home at Easter was to make a cuppa. Plus nobody else drinks it here. Also: brown sauce. I'm the only one that uses it at home, but as I hardly ever eat chips/chicken nuggets here/at uni like at home, it's been largely unused..

Already miss French food though :coma:
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FormerlyHistoryStudent
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#189
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#189
(Original post by rockrunride)
Summer/wintersun holidays are slightly different to going to say Paris or other associated cities. In Spain the package holiday Brits are after the sun, sand and music, therefore cafés will more than likely have British stuff because from a business point of view, the locals can really cash in on the holidaymakers. I'm disappointed by that attitude to travelling but when it's there, I'd have no complaints about tourists buying that sort of stuff. In Paris, Amsterdam or wherever, people go for sights and culture and to even think about ordering tea there is a bit of a deer-in-the-headlights moment. I mean, if it's there, fine! If it's chiefly British, live without it! I haven't seen a baked bean in absolutely ages.

I'm the same. My mum gave me a jar of Marmite at Christmas because I work quickly through them at home (less so at uni). There's still some left in there. Also for me a cup of tea is a social thing. Got a box of teabags at Christmas and (probably because there's no kettle here) I've hardly used any of them, yet one of the first things I did when I got home at Easter was to make a cuppa. Plus nobody else drinks it here. Also: brown sauce. I'm the only one that uses it at home, but as I hardly ever eat chips/chicken nuggets here/at uni like at home, it's been largely unused..

Already miss French food though :coma:
I know what you mean about package holidays - I suppose if the English pubs etc. are there, people will take advantage of it, and although I don't like it I can't really complain. I didn't mean just those though, I meant any city break really, like Barcelona or Lisbon or Rome. Spain was just the first country that came to mind Going away to any of those places for a week and insisting on not only eating lots of stuff you brought with you from home but also spending time and hassle trying to order food/ drink done in the British style in restaurants, is a bit sad in my opinion. If you've come abroad to experience a new culture, then surely you should include food and drink in that to get a better experience?
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FormerlyFrisbeeFan
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#190
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#190
(Original post by FormerlyHistoryStudent)
Well I wouldn't go so far as to say they shouldn't be abroad at all, but I do think that complaining about there being no British-style tea does indicate to me a lack of something. Not saying that everyone who tries to order that kind of tea does this, but in some cases a person will insist on ordering British-style tea, eats at fast-food restaurants or at English pubs almost exclusively, complains if a certain dish is done differently to how it is in Britain, etc., and to me that shows a huge unappreciation of local food and customs. Local people probably look on, thinking 'typical British person, unwilling to try anything different'...

If you're in a country or continent long term then I can understand someone beginning to crave something they love if it's not available there (for example, if you're in India for a long time then you may start craving beef stew), but I can't help but feel a bit disappointed in people who go on holiday to Spain for example for a week or two and have stuffed their suitcases with baked beans, teabags, ketchup, rich tea biscuits and many other British foodstuffs, because they can't bear to be away from the familiar for even a fortnight. I have to admit, when I went round the world I did pack two packets of Morrisons value custard powder, because I thought it might be nice to discover them if I fancied a late night snack in a youth hostel or something, but that's all. As it happened, I completely forgot I even had them all the way through Asia, and only remembered when I arrived in Australia and the signs in Immigration about declaring certain foodstuffs jolted my memory.
I agree! I can't go abroad now without looking at locals and wondering if they're assuming I'm a typical British tourist, crashing through foreign holidays without caring about any local cuisine or culture. It's a bit depressing really, though obviously I always try to prove the stereotype wrong!

Edit: Saying that, the rugby tour to Amsterdam didn't really involve any local cuisine or culture, other than beer drinking but that was the tour judges' fault not mine!
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Fusion
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#191
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#191
(Original post by ConnorB)
Northern Ireland.
Walk on some granite, cross a rope-bridge, get drunk on Guinness.
And try not to get stabbed once they realise you have a Catholic name!
I think NI is the 2nd safest place for tourists after Japan
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gemini89
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#192
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#192
(Original post by fatal)
Got off the plane in AUckland to dreary rain then went my grandparents on the Coromandel Peninsula for quite possibly the worst family dinner I've ever had in my life.
Why was your dinner so awful??! I love the Coromandel, I lived there during my gap year, specifically in Thames. The Peninsula is so beautiful - amazing, deserted beaches that stretch for miles and then the interior is wonderful untouched forest, complete with huge kauri trees
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tokoyo-chan
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#193
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#193
(Original post by lazyswot)
Dogs are not allowed in many shops, unless they are guide dogs, but that is because they are big, loud, take up space, can knock things off shelves etc, and are unhygienic in certain types of shops. When it comes down to it, there is no reason why they should be allowed in a shop when there is no guarantee that all dogs will be well-behaved. It depends how well they've been trained.
same applies to kids but they r still allowed in the shops... and they actually scream so loud that it makes ur ears hurt...
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lazyswot
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#194
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#194
(Original post by tokoyo-chan)
same applies to kids but they r still allowed in the shops... and they actually scream so loud that it makes ur ears hurt...
Kids don't have fleas and lick the displays. Plus, they are humans, and can't be left unsupervised.

(not saying all dogs have fleas. I love dogs, but they are not humans!)
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fatal
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#195
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#195
(Original post by gemini89)
Why was your dinner so awful??! I love the Coromandel, I lived there during my gap year, specifically in Thames. The Peninsula is so beautiful - amazing, deserted beaches that stretch for miles and then the interior is wonderful untouched forest, complete with huge kauri trees
My grandparents live in Thames It wasn't so much the food, more the...atmosphere lol.
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gemini89
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#196
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#196
(Original post by fatal)
My grandparents live in Thames It wasn't so much the food, more the...atmosphere lol.
Ah, that's not good! How funny that your grandparents live there! Thames isn't the greatest place in the world (I can understand how someone visiting would be a bit underwealmed) but it's got some lovely cafes and great access to the rest of the peninsula and the Kauaeranga Valley....it really grew on me
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Pi!
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#197
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#197
Paris. Maybe because I went with the school, but it was underwhelming.
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ConnorB
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#198
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#198
(Original post by Fusion)
I think NI is the 2nd safest place for tourists after Japan
Regardless. there is nothing to do. At all. While the majority of people are lovely, they are an incredibly conservative country and many people are judgmental.
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tokoyo-chan
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#199
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#199
(Original post by lazyswot)
Kids don't have fleas and lick the displays. Plus, they are humans, and can't be left unsupervised.

(not saying all dogs have fleas. I love dogs, but they are not humans!)
see? this attitude is exactly what i mean. well thank god they r not humans, otherwise there would be more lying and disrespect in this world than there is now. humans think that they r always the perfect creation of nature cos they understand physics, chemistry etc, but in fact its the other way round. im not gonna bother explaining my whole point of view, though. i just think that if humans started thinking of animals in a different way, it would save so much trouble for everybody. i mean its so typical of us to just notice the bad things like 'no dogs cos dogs have fleas, are dirty blah blah blah' and they dont even think of the possibility that somebodys kid can start hitting other customers with a toy (happened to me, lol) and touch fresh fish with their dirty hands. and if this attitude continues, then people who are maybe brought up in difficult conditions like their parents are alcoholics for example, are more likely to think 'ok humans up there and animals down there, am a human so i can do whatever i want to this dog. am so angry right now so am just gonna put all my anger into this dog.' makes sense to me.
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adam_zed
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#200
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#200
(Original post by screenager2004)
Last year we did a tour of Europe and it was massively disappointing. All the cities looked the same. All had the same H&M on the high street and naff cafes. Really really massive waste of money. Not going back to Europe any time soon!
Is this a joke?
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