What do you think of public school pupils? Watch

unclej
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#181
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#181
(Original post by apolocreed)
*their...they probably wouldn't make that mistake
But they probably would be pretentious enough to correct someones grammar on tsr
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medbh4805
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#182
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#182
(Original post by Architecture-er)
I don't quite follow you, you seem to be inventing what I've said in order to match your brilliant points.

I said public schools aid their pupils by providing better extra-curricular activity facilities and interview preparation. That's a fact, I didn't ask you to try and argue anything.
erm right. You said:

Oxbridge isn't particularly hard to get into purely on a grade basis, it's the interviews and extra-curricular. Which public schools can prepare you for far more rigourously.

I don't know if you've been through the Oxbridge application process, but I have, and they asked me for the top academic achievements of my parents, and what their professions were. You have to wonder why that's at all relevant.
ISA then said that extra curriculars don't matter, as it's about academic potential. You then said:

But I had already taken it as read that the applicants would be performing perfectly adequately in regard to grades, as most Oxbridge applicants do
To which I replied that good grades alone are not necessarily an indicator of academic potential.

Please enlighten me as to what exactly I claimed you said which you did not.

Certainly, private school students receive help in preparing for their interviews at Oxbridge. No one commented on it because you are correct, but you can't expect to say things which are incorrect or misleading and not expect people to challenge you on it, especially when you are posting in the 'Debate and Current Affairs' section of a public forum.
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fudgesundae
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#183
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#183
(Original post by Junaid96)
Snob - "condescending or overbearing to others"

I really don't care though. You can dodge definitions and throw dictionaries at me, but it's still rich-kid behaviour.

This thread asked us for our opinions. How can you say my subjective thoughts are wrong?
You're entitled to your opinion, I was merely pointing out that you used the wrong word to describe your thoughts.


(Original post by prophecy~)
That is true. Although if a student was the 'Oxbridge type' (high UMS/STEP/MAT marks) then he/she would get into Cambridge regardless whether they attended a state school or private school. Yes the private school may offer more support, although for the amount you pay - it's just not worth it.
If someone thought it wasn't worth it, then they wouldn't pay for it. The mere fact that a lot of parents do pay for their kids to go to private schools does show that they believe it is worth it. Some people though, including yourself, don't think it is worth it and consequently don't send their children to private schools.
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fudgesundae
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#184
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#184
(Original post by KAB1010101)
I highly doubt that's true anymore (if it ever was) since they're reluctant to take more than 10/15 students from one school

(Original post by Sir Fox)
Oh well, in this case I might have been mislead. I once spent some weeks at a summer school at Sevenoaks School and their website states that in 2012 they received 46 Oxbridge offers. In 2011 Tonbridge School sent 30 people to Oxbridge
It happens. My school sends 60-70 to Oxbridge out of a year of 150-170. There are about 5-10 schools which send similar numbers.
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im so academic
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#185
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#185
(Original post by M'Ling)
I'll go off my own experience of A-Levels at my own state school. Thirty people per class, most people struggling to get a C, maybe 2 people who actually care and want to be there. Half the class won't turn up for class, and those that do are late. The teacher spends more time with the U/D/E students so that they can bring the class pass mark up. The brighter students, the ones on Bs and As, are ignored and left to it; they receive hardly any help regarding their studies, left ignored by an overloaded teacher who has to cope with people who haven't handed yet handed in their coursework. Homework, by the way, is virtually non-existent since 80% of the class wouldn't do it anyway. When exam time comes around, revision classes become pointless for the higher-ability students since the lower-ability students, the ones who have done no work all year, ask elementary questions, the answers to which the brighter students already know.

Are you really telling me private schools, with smaller classes and more willing students, higher average-class marks, and more attention from the teacher, went through the same struggles as a state-schooled person? Of course nobody is "better" for going to either school, but surely the AAA state-school student has worked harder and has more to be proud of than the privately-educated drone who, with the majority of their class, takes AAA at A-Level without surprise.
Not necessarily. Again the AAA private school student will may have been encouraged to do lots of extra reading, twice-weekly essays to a high standard, daily homework etc etc.

Whereas the AAA state school student only learnt the content for the exam.

The former would get into Oxbridge rather than the latter.

In addition, 80% gets you an A. So does 100%. There is a big difference between scraping the A and actually mastering the content and getting secure As. The abilities of the AAA private school student and the AAA state school student are not the same.

Also, you don't know the personal lives of the private school students. They may have family difficulties at home, financial pressures, mental issues, SEN and who knows what other things. Just because you're privately educated it doesn't mean you get AAA very easy.

Hard work =/= academic potential and aptitude.
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im so academic
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#186
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#186
(Original post by M'Ling)
I apologise. I merely meant that private schools are very good at producing A-grade students en masse.
That's only because they're more likely to be bright in the first place (due to their upbringings where education was valued etc) and remember, many private schools are selective.
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MsAaliyah
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#187
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#187
I have never met anyone that went to a public school, well to be honest I have never really asked anyone whether they went to a state or private school.

I know this is simply a stereotype BUT I think public school pupils have probably never had any real struggles in their lives and have had everything handed to them; whenever they want to go on holiday or want to buy something no matter how expensive, their parents will buy it for them. I don't know I just have this image that public school students have it so good.

In general though I think they are normal like anyone else in that they enjoy doing the same things anyone else does, for example when at uni they will want to party and go out as much as the next person. The only difference is that they have much more money than the rest of us.
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M'Ling
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#188
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#188
(Original post by im so academic)
The abilities of the AAA private school student and the AAA state school student are not the same.
Don't generalise; many state-school people beat private school people on UMS marks.

(Original post by im so academic)
Also, you don't know the personal lives of the private school students. They may have family difficulties at home, financial pressures, mental issues, SEN and who knows what other things. Just because you're privately educated it doesn't mean you get AAA very easy.
Well the same could be said for people who go to state school, having SEN/financial issues is not exclusively a private school thing. In fact, I'd wager there's a higher number of SEN students in state schools.

Also, you failed to address my comparison of a state-school classroom with a private school one. Would you not agree that, based on my description, the private-school has the advantage in terms of a good learning environment?
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pricey26
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#189
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#189
(Original post by Hewitt)
Going to a public school myself I am always intrigued to see how people from outside the system view the people in it. I am aware that some people view public school kids as posh snobs.

What do you guys think of the people who go to public schools?
In my area we have the 11+ system - the top 25% go to a grammar school and the other 75% go to the normal secondary schools. Therefore, the view is that the public school kids are rich snobs who've failed to get into the grammar schools and so have used money to get out of going to a normal secondary school, which their parents clearly view as beneath them. They also use this as an opportunity to look down on all the secondary schools, as for some reason they think their money makes them better.
Obviously, I don't believe this for everyone it's just there are a few who cause this stereotypical view. In general, not in my area, I have no problem with private schools it's just in my area this is the common view and the public school kids act like they are better than everyone else!
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im so academic
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#190
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#190
(Original post by M'Ling)
Don't generalise; many state-school people beat private school people on UMS marks.
I'm not talking about marks and percentages and grades. I'm talking about education. Who cares if you got AAA? A privately educated student with AAB might be better educated than a state educated student with AAA. This also works both ways.

Well the same could be said for people who go to state school, having SEN/financial issues is not exclusively a private school thing. In fact, I'd wager there's a higher number of SEN students in state schools.
Doesn't mean that all private school students have an easy ride.

Also, you failed to address my comparison of a state-school classroom with a private school one. Would you not agree that, based on my description, the private-school has the advantage in terms of a good learning environment?
Yes, private schools generally do offer better learning environments. That does NOT mean ALL state students have a harder ride. That does not follow.
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ceris
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#191
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#191
Stereotyping is dangerous. I have attended both. I'd like to think I turned out ok.
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bssjonny
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#192
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#192
I'm embarrassed to ask, but can somebody tell me the difference between state, public and private schools.
More specifically the difference between state and public. They sound like they would be the same thing. :confused:
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TurboCretin
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#193
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#193
(Original post by MsAaliyah)
I have never met anyone that went to a public school, well to be honest I have never really asked anyone whether they went to a state or private school.

I know this is simply a stereotype BUT I think public school pupils have probably never had any real struggles in their lives and have had everything handed to them; whenever they want to go on holiday or want to buy something no matter how expensive, their parents will buy it for them. I don't know I just have this image that public school students have it so good.

In general though I think they are normal like anyone else in that they enjoy doing the same things anyone else does, for example when at uni they will want to party and go out as much as the next person. The only difference is that they have much more money than the rest of us.
There are people at private schools whose parents struggle to pay the fees even though their kid got in on a scholarship, and there are state school students whose parents could afford to buy the school a new chemistry department and whose first car was a Mercedes. From personal experience.
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TurboCretin
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#194
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#194
(Original post by bssjonny)
I'm embarrassed to ask, but can somebody tell me the difference between state, public and private schools.
More specifically the difference between state and public. They sound like they would be the same thing. :confused:
Public and private are the same: independent, fee paying. State schools are state funded.

The terminology relating to 'public' schools arose due to the contrast with private home schooling and Church schools. Public schools were public in the sense of being open to the paying public.
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Delphinus
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#195
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#195
(Original post by fudgesundae)
It happens. My school sends 60-70 to Oxbridge out of a year of 150-170. There are about 5-10 schools which send similar numbers.
OKKKKKKK jeeez sorry i didn't realise. Well none of the state/private/public schools in my area send 'over half' their students O.o

I think it's crazy that one school should send so many but whatever.
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must try harder.
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(Original post by MsAaliyah)
I have never met anyone that went to a public school, well to be honest I have never really asked anyone whether they went to a state or private school.

I know this is simply a stereotype BUT I think public school pupils have probably never had any real struggles in their lives and have had everything handed to them; whenever they want to go on holiday or want to buy something no matter how expensive, their parents will buy it for them. I don't know I just have this image that public school students have it so good.

In general though I think they are normal like anyone else in that they enjoy doing the same things anyone else does, for example when at uni they will want to party and go out as much as the next person. The only difference is that they have much more money than the rest of us.
I think that's a bit harsh, and it is a stereotype. You can never really know whether anyone's had any struggles in their lives unless you ask them, and the idea that parents will hand them everything they want is also misguided - of course this is the case for some people, but this isn't true for the majority of students at public schools. As for the money, I know plenty of people who could have afforded the tuition fees but still decided not to.. I have nothing against either type of student - there's no reason to.
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House MD
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#197
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#197
(Original post by bssjonny)
I'm embarrassed to ask, but can somebody tell me the difference between state, public and private schools.
More specifically the difference between state and public. They sound like they would be the same thing. :confused:
State schools are funded by the government. All public schools are private schools, but not all private schools are public schools.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_...nited_Kingdom)

Public schools are private schools which are also "members of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and are in general older, more expensive and more exclusive"
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Delphinus
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(Original post by Sir Fox)
I'm not against private schools and I have nothing against people who attend them - otherwise I wouldn't have friends who did so My comment wasn't sarcastic, when I checked the statistics for the school I was talking about they indeed only sent 8 students to Oxbridge this year, by far less than I claimed. In contrast to other people on the internet I'm able to admit when I've been wrong and that's what I did.

I then researched the two schools I've spent summer schools at (Tonbridge and Sevenoaks) and listed their statistics in order to show that Oxbridge still accept more than 10-15 students form certain schools.

That's it, no sarcasm.

And by the way - I would have loved to spend my last years of school at a British boarding school. My parents encouraged me to do so but back then I just wasn't ready to leave home and live in another country. Soon I'm going to study in Scotland - everything at the proper time
well good luck with that I love Scotland! couldn't go there for uni though waaaaaay too far - and i only live nextdoor in England haha
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Delphinus
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#199
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#199
(Original post by TurboCretin)
Between 2002 and 2007, half of Westminster School's leavers went to Oxford or Cambridge. This translates to numbers in the mid-70s each year. Eton sends numbers in the upper 30s.

This time last year, the Sutton Trust released a report showing that there were five schools in this country which boasted more Oxbridge entrants than 2000 others combined.
Soooorry, I was very wrong - didn't realise some schools actually get that many students in to oxbridge - can't quite believe it... but there we go. I assume they're all public schools?
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HDBrowne
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#200
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#200
(Original post by Hewitt)
Going to a public school myself I am always intrigued to see how people from outside the system view the people in it. I am aware that some people view public school kids as posh snobs.

What do you guys think of the people who go to public schools?
You get snobs in State schools too.

I went to a school where it's catchment area covered a huge demographic of wealth so their were economic differences between a lot of the students.

I made friends with the local private school kids in college as it only went up to 16 and they were the nicest people I have met... well bare one.
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