kdk
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#181
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#181
Does anyone know if there is a separate formula sheet for the optional topics or not?


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username890104
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#182
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#182
(Original post by kdk)
Does anyone know if there is a separate formula sheet for the optional topics or not?
No, you get the same data sheet as you would have for PHYA4. The last page of it has all the formulae for the optional units.

Here: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects...-INS-JUN12.PDF
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JoshL123
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#183
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Hey everyone! Could someone help me to please clarify this? I thought that the answer may be beta. My logic was based on the idea that it couldn't be alpha, given that alpha particles have the same initial kinetic energy (due to the conservation of momentum). And so I thought that it could not explain for why the paths shown in the cloud chamber were of different lengths. I then thought it may be beta (given that beta particles can have different kinetic energies). But then yet again it made me consider that beta particles have a curved track in a cloud chamber.

The answer is alpha. Could someone please help me to clarify this? Thanks!
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posthumus
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#184
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(Original post by JoshL123)
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Hey everyone! Could someone help me to please clarify this? I thought that the answer may be beta. My logic was based on the idea that it couldn't be alpha, given that alpha particles have the same initial kinetic energy (due to the conservation of momentum). And so I thought that it could not explain for why the paths shown in the cloud chamber were of different lengths. I then thought it may be beta (given that beta particles can have different kinetic energies). But then yet again it made me consider that beta particles have a curved track in a cloud chamber.

The answer is alpha. Could someone please help me to clarify this? Thanks!
Erm I'm not too sure about your explanation of kinetic energies as I thought alpha was emitted with random energies of up to 10eV.

I think they just want you to realize the short range and conclude that alpha particle is being emitted. It's only part a) & one mark, so keep it simples!

And yh I think beta particles also would have had a more curved track
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JoshL123
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#185
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#185
(Original post by posthumus)
Erm I'm not too sure about your explanation of kinetic energies as I thought alpha was emitted with random energies of up to 10eV.

I think they just want you to realize the short range and conclude that alpha particle is being emitted. It's only part a) & one mark, so keep it simples!

And yh I think beta particles also would have had a more curved track
Ah thanks. I had just read in a book that alpha particles are ejected with the same kinetic energy. Thanks though!
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kdk
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#186
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#186
(Original post by JoshL123)
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Hey everyone! Could someone help me to please clarify this? I thought that the answer may be beta. My logic was based on the idea that it couldn't be alpha, given that alpha particles have the same initial kinetic energy (due to the conservation of momentum). And so I thought that it could not explain for why the paths shown in the cloud chamber were of different lengths. I then thought it may be beta (given that beta particles can have different kinetic energies). But then yet again it made me consider that beta particles have a curved track in a cloud chamber.

The answer is alpha. Could someone please help me to clarify this? Thanks!
All the Alpha particles emitted from the same source have the same kinetic energy. I think it is alpha because it has formed a continuous straight line track in the cloud chamber. The Beta particles can easily get deflected by air molecules, so they form wispy tracks.
Correct me if I am wrong



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Namige
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#187
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#187
Can someone explain why discrete photons are given off when a beta particle is produced?
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Lucy-1995
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#188
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Just wondered if anyone knew of more exam packs for this Unit 5 topic? Since there are only 3 past papers on the AQA website and I cant seem to find any decent websites with questions that will actually help!

The optional module we're doing is applied physics, so if anyone knows any good websites for that and the main part everyone does I would really appreciate it!!
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lantern
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#189
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#189
(Original post by Lucy-1995)
Just wondered if anyone knew of more exam packs for this Unit 5 topic? Since there are only 3 past papers on the AQA website and I cant seem to find any decent websites with questions that will actually help!

The optional module we're doing is applied physics, so if anyone knows any good websites for that and the main part everyone does I would really appreciate it!!
http://www.freeexampapers.com/index....QA%2FPhysics+A

This site has all the past papers from previous specification. But you'll have to pick out questions that are relevant.
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Lucy-1995
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#190
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#190
(Original post by lantern)
http://www.freeexampapers.com/index....QA%2FPhysics+A

This site has all the past papers from previous specification. But you'll have to pick out questions that are relevant.
Thanks! When I click to open them it says it may harm my computer though
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lantern
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#191
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#191
(Original post by Lucy-1995)
Thanks! When I click to open them it says it may harm my computer though
Hmm that doesn't come up on my computer. :holmes:
Try this site instead
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Lucy-1995
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#192
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#192
(Original post by lantern)
Hmm that doesn't come up on my computer. :holmes:
Try this site instead
Oh thanks that one works I'll go on the other one and print them all off when I'm at school, I mean who cares about their computers right!
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lantern
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#193
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(Original post by Lucy-1995)
Oh thanks that one works I'll go on the other one and print them all off when I'm at school, I mean who cares about their computers right!
Haha

I'm a bit worried that there aren't many past papers for the new specification... I need to do a lot of practice under timed conditions as I keep running out of time!
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Lucy-1995
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#194
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(Original post by lantern)
Haha

I'm a bit worried that there aren't many past papers for the new specification... I need to do a lot of practice under timed conditions as I keep running out of time!
Yeah same, there's only 3 and then the specimen paper which sucks! Need to get a good feel for the types of questions!
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posthumus
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#195
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#195
(Original post by Namige)
Can someone explain why discrete photons are given off when a beta particle is produced?
Are they ?

Or do you mean it passes through a cathode ray tube full of inert gas, or when it hits a fluorescent screen ?
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Namige
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#196
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#196
(Original post by posthumus)
Are they ?

Or do you mean it passes through a cathode ray tube full of inert gas, or when it hits a fluorescent screen ?
No, that has nothing to do with nuclear Physics?

This is a june 08 question : Explain why sources of beta radiation often also produce gamma rays of discrete energies. You may be awarded for communication etc.
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ehtisham_1
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#197
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#197
(Original post by Namige)
Can someone explain why discrete photons are given off when a beta particle is produced?
its because when the beta particle(electron leaves the atom, it is in a excetited state, so one of the other electrons de-excite to produce a photon
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lantern
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#198
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#198
(Original post by Namige)
Can someone explain why discrete photons are given off when a beta particle is produced?
It allows nucleus to lose energy. There's an explanation on page169 of Nelson Thornes textbook

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posthumus
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#199
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(Original post by Namige)
No, that has nothing to do with nuclear Physics?

This is a june 08 question : Explain why sources of beta radiation often also produce gamma rays of discrete energies. You may be awarded for communication etc.
Oh right my bad.. I saw photon and immediately thought visible light spectrum

After beta decay the nucleus usually has excess energy, so it's excited So the energy is lost via gamma ray emission. How many marks was the question ?
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DaaronPKKO
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#200
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#200
Anyone have any useful help on rotational dynamics for the optional topic?


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