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myah_94
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#181
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#181
(Original post by biology911)
I can’t find the question you’re referring to. I’m lookingat page 147, bottom right
No, sorry it's page 162
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anonymouscake
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#182
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#182
does anyone have answers to all of the as esq's?
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Shinusuke_Akki
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#183
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#183
(Original post by kiyubi)
thank you soooooo much!
No problem, hope what you wanted was there ^.^
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biology911
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#184
(Original post by myah_94)
No, sorry it's page 162
It’s not the clearest question I’ve ever seen (the wording “Within each variety...” is confusing)
but I assume they are looking for:

  • prevent inbreeding which could ultimately lead to homozygosity for many characteristics


  • preserve the existing variety (or even increase it?) bycrossing different genotypes.
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Sophie1994
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#185
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I've attached a question in the doc below that I don't really understand, can someone explain it thanks

Tissue fluid.docx
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biology911
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(Original post by Sophie1994)
I've attached a question in the doc below that I don't really understand, can someone explain it thanks

Tissue fluid.docx
I guess they’reare after the fact tissue fluid forms at the arterial end of a capillary so long as:
net hydrostatic pressure inside capillary > in surrounding tissue fluid

In this example inside capillary = + 5.2 – 3.15
=2.05
surrounding tissue = + 0.45 – 0.35
=0.1
pressure differential = 2.05 – 0.1
(which forces
fluid out of capillary)

= 1.95
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BobTheBuilder94
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#187
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#187
(Original post by liquid394)
by all means .

Describe and Explain the process of Semi-conservative replication.
Sorry been putting this q off for a few days, this is just from my jan exam memory...

DNA Helicase unzips the double helix (DNA) into two single stranded poly nucleotides. Free complementary bases (roaming around) attach to the 2 single stranded DNA polynucleotide strands- which act as template strands. This forms 4 single polynucleotide strands, DNA polymerase (enzyme) is used to join the polynucleotide strands together into 2 double helixes.

Explain the cohesion-tension theory
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User944645
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#188
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#188
If anybody wants revision notes, mine are here

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...505&p=41970257
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Sophie1994
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#189
(Original post by biology911)
I guess they’reare after the fact tissue fluid forms at the arterial end of a capillary so long as:
net hydrostatic pressure inside capillary > in surrounding tissue fluid

In this example inside capillary = + 5.2 – 3.15
=2.05
surrounding tissue = + 0.45 – 0.35
=0.1
pressure differential = 2.05 – 0.1
(which forces
fluid out of capillary)

= 1.95
Yep I understand the part where the hydrostatic pressure inside the capillary must be higher than outside in the tissue fluid also that water potential must be more negative for tissue fluid formation.

The aspect which confuses me is the calculation bite... because at least, I worked out the difference in hydrostatic pressure in the capillary and in the tissue fluids then took it away from the difference in water potential and arrived at 1.95

so I did 5.2-0.45=4.75 (difference in HP)
then -3.15-(-0.35)=-2.8 (difference in water potential)

Final step -> 4.75-2.8= 1.95

... the thing is my calculations looks dodgy and I know it looks incorrect and how it arrived at the right answer I don't understand :ashamed2:
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biology911
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#190
(Original post by Sophie1994)
Yep I understand the part where the hydrostatic pressure inside the capillary must be higher than outside in the tissue fluid also that water potential must be more negative for tissue fluid formation.

The aspect which confuses me is the calculation bite... because at least, I worked out the difference in hydrostatic pressure in the capillary and in the tissue fluids then took it away from the difference in water potential and arrived at 1.95

so I did 5.2-0.45=4.75 (difference in HP)
then -3.15-(-0.35)=-2.8 (difference in water potential)

Final step -> 4.75-2.8= 1.95

... the thing is my calculations looks dodgy and I know it looks incorrect and how it arrived at the right answer I don't understand :ashamed2:
I think you’re methodology looks better than mine!
(1) You’ve worked out the overall pressure differential thatwould send water out (4.75)
(2) Then you’ve worked out the effective Ψdifferential that would draw water in (-2.8)
(3) Putting these together, you found the resultant pressureto be 1.95. Brilliant.
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Sophie1994
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#191
(Original post by biology911)
I think you’re methodology looks better than mine!
(1) You’ve worked out the overall pressure differential thatwould send water out (4.75)
(2) Then you’ve worked out the effective Ψdifferential that would draw water in (-2.8)
(3) Putting these together, you found the resultant pressureto be 1.95. Brilliant.
Haha thanks even though I got the answer I'm unsure of the last step. From the calculations I got 4.75 and -2.8.

I thought I would do 4.75 - (-2.8)= 7.55 since is always the biggest take away the smallest but this gives me 7.55.. this is the part I'm don't understand, or it is because is water potential so I just ignore the negative signs and turn the number into positive?
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biology911
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#192
(Original post by Sophie1994)
Haha thanks even though I got the answer I'm unsure of the last step. From the calculations I got 4.75 and -2.8.

I thought I would do 4.75 - (-2.8)= 7.55 since is always the biggest take away the smallest but this gives me 7.55.. this is the part I'm don't understand, or it is because is water potential so I just ignore the negative signs and turn the number into positive?
Ah I see what you mean. I treated it like algebra where I was just putting a positive integer with a negative integer and let them fight it out! That’s all I’ve got.
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Sophie1994
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#193
(Original post by biology911)
Ah I see what you mean. I treated it like algebra where I was just putting a positive integer with a negative integer and let them fight it out! That’s all I’ve got.
Haha, yep, I'll definitely try that out if I come across another question like this. :cool:
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F1's Finest
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#194
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#194
You don't need to work out pressure, It's not in the spec.
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biology911
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#195
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#195
(Original post by James A)
You don't need to work out pressure, It's not in the spec.
There is no requirement to list all instances of data handling or numerical operations in the spec. Production of tissue fluid is in there, so a question involving a calculation is legitimate
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F1's Finest
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#196
(Original post by biology911)
There is no requirement to list all instances of data handling or numerical operations in the spec. Production of tissue fluid is in there, so a question involving a calculation is legitimate
Where is this on the spec?
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Swords N Thorns
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#197
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#197
What do we have to actually know about Meiosis?
My CGP book seems to go into a fair bit of detail compared to the Nelson Thornes one...
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BobTheBuilder94
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#198
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#198
Please can someone explain tissue fluid formation, return of tissue fluid from capillary and the lymph for me. Thanks
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F1's Finest
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#199
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#199
As I've said before, if you want to know what you need to know / don't need to know, look at the spec. No point just going purely by the textbooks.
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science-oliver
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#200
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#200
Has anyone got the biol2 jan13 paper?
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