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    (Original post by ChrisP8)
    hey guys, I'm doing Edward 'moody b*stard' Thomas :P and Turn of the Screw, how do you structure your poetry?
    Turn of The Screw is an absolute disaster for me, I'll probably fail that part of the exam. One of the English teachers at my school created a slideshow on how to structure a poetry essay. I could send it to you if you want
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    Anyone have any Dorian Gray critics quotes please??
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    Yeah, it was pretty high last year (and boundaries for essay subjects don't usually change so much), although apparently examiners don't like to linger between bands when grading essays so that does work in a lot of people's favour (my teacher gave my Frankenstein mock 27/30, but then it got moderated up to 30 by the HoD who's an OCR examiner)

    Boundaries June 2012:

    Exam (out of 60) : 53 A, 46 B, 40 C, 34 D, 29 E

    Coursework (/40): 35 A, 30 B, 26 C, 22 D, 18 E

    source: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/16472-u...-june-2012.pdf

    On the bright side, because UMS always 'upscales' really high marks (and downscales lower scoring candidates), it does mean that if you got a really high mark for coursework, you don't need much for an A (40/40 in coursework means a C (44/60) in the Exam will get an A!)
    I got 40 so that's a bonus

    Thing is though my Frankenstein isn't all that strong so if I haven't demanded enough of you already could you please give me some pointers to getting a strong mark in the Frankenstein + Yeats? Thanks again
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    He thinks Leda is the likeliest with Easter next, but aterriblebeautyisborn had wild swans at coole as first in its poll last year with 20% of the vote and this year it's the same but with Easter so I'm thinking it's gonna be Easter tbh.
    Yeah my school predicted Wild Swans last year and so did aterriblebeautyisborn and it came up, and this year my school predicted Easter 1916 and so did a terriblebeautyisborn so hopefully this means there's a strong chance of it coming up Still have to revise everything though as anything could come up, apart from Broken Dreams or Wild Swans so I'm not revising them much. I think I really need to brush up on STB as it seems there's a chance of that coming up and my knowledge of it is really lacking compared to the other poems.
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    Is anyone doing emily dickinson poems and the turn of the screw?

    also if i got 35 marks (just an A) in my coursework, what would i need in the exam to get a B overall?
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    (Original post by yugiohtheawesome)
    I was just reading the Cold Heaven and trying to think about what to say on structure and form, but I'm stumped Can anyone help me out please? I know it's in iambic tetrameter and it has a chiasmus to highlight the Airman's solitude, but is there anything else I could say?
    Are you sure you're talking about Cold Heaven and not An Irish Airman?...

    cold heaven:
    You could say a lot about the enjambment within the poem and how it flows continuously without being seperated into stanzas. This could be representative of Yeats' thoughts running through his mind, he is unable to control these thoughts and is having a sudden realisation that he has wasted so much time loving Maud.
    There is not a lot of structure, so you just have to point that out and link it to context I guess :/
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    I don't know... I think that OCR are going to throw us a curveball and give us 'The Fisherman' or 'An Irish Airman'. Although, if 'Easter 1916' does come up, I'll be happy because that's what I did my mock on, and there's lots to say for AO4 context (10 marks!)

    I'm starting to learn by heart my quotes for Dorian Gray. I too am having difficulty with AO3 critical quotes, but my teacher is emailing me some later. Ooooh tomorrow's going to be hard because I have another exam in the morning
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    I got 40 so that's a bonus

    Thing is though my Frankenstein isn't all that strong so if I haven't demanded enough of you already could you please give me some pointers to getting a strong mark in the Frankenstein + Yeats? Thanks again
    It's good revision for me as well

    Obviously in an essay you should do PQC - Point, Quote & Comment (or PEEing), the examiners point out is that people don't provide enough scope for quotes - they're isolated in essays.
    You should have a mid-view, an indepth and then an overall text/poem wide view of the quote e.g. if it's an irony quote, comment on where else it is present and what it means for the text as a whole to the readers / background.

    In terms of revising, I'm looking back at all my essays and finding good phrases I've used that are succinct, especially those with references to other critics / texts as I always find it difficult to fluently add them into my arguments, so in the real thing I can just copy them without too much time wasted thinking about what to say i.e. in one of my terror essays:

    "...Shelley blurs the traditional roles in Gothic literature, present in such works like Lewis' 1796 horror 'The Monk', where the physical manifestation of supernatural horror reigns in Ambrosio as he transgresses a clear moral boundary; in Frankenstein...." (I didn't actually read the Monk, but referencing (or even quoting) external texts, especially Paradise Lost will impress examiners as it shows you've read wider texts)

    or a nice pithy line (I adapted from OCRs Frankenstein guide): "Victor is a man both haunted and hunted, damaged yet also damaging to the lives of others"

    Speaking of OCRs Frankenstein guide, that's a really nice document full of ideas: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/80969-u...ading-list.pdf

    Also make sure you plan your essays! It does help if you take 5 minutes (or 1 if you're paranoid about not starting to write) to scribble down ideas and critics relevant to the essay. It's also helpful to just scan through the poem and underline fancy literary techniques before you forget them, you don't want to be spending time reminiscing about the poem again)

    I prefer to start with the Frankenstein essay, as I tend to *slightly* overrun (i.e. 1hr 10mins vs 50 mins poetry), but I find it's worth it to give more developed critical views, as well as planning for the essay takes a longer time since the question is more probing than the same old poetry 'How does Yeats present [the main theme] in the poem? But I'd peek at the Yeats question first to let your subconscious think about the poem for an hour.

    And as always keep writing 'Shelley' does this, and 'Yeats' does that, as apparently examiners like that sort of stuff. Apparently fancy long words / phrases also help, my favourite is 'chthonic' lexical field - words pertaining to the underworld (and hence Paradise Lost)

    Finally, when using critics for Frankenstein, make sure you argue with / against the critic rather than just stating '[this bloke] thinks this', an easy way to make sure you 'engage' with them is if you find two opposing critics, you state both and then you can easily just explain whose side you're on

    e.g. Reason for Frankenstein's suffering:

    Anne Mellor - he pissed off Shelley and women - Frankenstein 'supports a patriarchal denial of the value of women and female sexuality'

    David Punter - he pissed off God - Frankenstein 'is doomed to perpetual life on earth' for committing 'the ultimate crime against God'
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    I'm answering on Dorian Gray and Yeats... TOMORROW!
    Anyone else this nervous?
    Also, I'm predicting a political poem because all (two!!) of the others have been Romantics...


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    (Original post by ArtisticFlair)
    I don't know... I think that OCR are going to throw us a curveball and give us 'The Fisherman' or 'An Irish Airman'. Although, if 'Easter 1916' does come up, I'll be happy because that's what I did my mock on, and there's lots to say for AO4 context (10 marks!)

    I'm starting to learn by heart my quotes for Dorian Gray. I too am having difficulty with AO3 critical quotes, but my teacher is emailing me some later. Ooooh tomorrow's going to be hard because I have another exam in the morning
    I agree there will b a curveball but I reckon it will still b a political poem!! I hoping they ask nice questions on Dorian Gray and how many critics do we need??
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    (Original post by ArtisticFlair)
    I don't know... I think that OCR are going to throw us a curveball and give us 'The Fisherman' or 'An Irish Airman'. Although, if 'Easter 1916' does come up, I'll be happy because that's what I did my mock on, and there's lots to say for AO4 context (10 marks!)

    I'm starting to learn by heart my quotes for Dorian Gray. I too am having difficulty with AO3 critical quotes, but my teacher is emailing me some later. Ooooh tomorrow's going to be hard because I have another exam in the morning
    Just remember Yeats is a stylistic analysis and context is supposed to further the analysis. That means primarily links to other poems and not biographical information about his life or the Easter Rising

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    Anyone have good structural analysis for Cat and Moon

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    (Original post by GeneralStudent95)
    Anyone have good structural analysis for Cat and Moon

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    what quotes can i remember for Wuhtering heights and the colour purple to use in any question . ITS URGENT
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    It's good revision for me as well

    Obviously in an essay you should do PQC - Point, Quote & Comment (or PEEing), the examiners point out is that people don't provide enough scope for quotes - they're isolated in essays.
    You should have a mid-view, an indepth and then an overall text/poem wide view of the quote e.g. if it's an irony quote, comment on where else it is present and what it means for the text as a whole to the readers / background.

    In terms of revising, I'm looking back at all my essays and finding good phrases I've used that are succinct, especially those with references to other critics / texts as I always find it difficult to fluently add them into my arguments, so in the real thing I can just copy them without too much time wasted thinking about what to say i.e. in one of my terror essays:

    "...Shelley blurs the traditional roles in Gothic literature, present in such works like Lewis' 1796 horror 'The Monk', where the physical manifestation of supernatural horror reigns in Ambrosio as he transgresses a clear moral boundary; in Frankenstein...." (I didn't actually read the Monk, but referencing (or even quoting) external texts, especially Paradise Lost will impress examiners as it shows you've read wider texts)

    or a nice pithy line (I adapted from OCRs Frankenstein guide): "Victor is a man both haunted and hunted, damaged yet also damaging to the lives of others"

    Speaking of OCRs Frankenstein guide, that's a really nice document full of ideas: http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/80969-u...ading-list.pdf

    Also make sure you plan your essays! It does help if you take 5 minutes (or 1 if you're paranoid about not starting to write) to scribble down ideas and critics relevant to the essay. It's also helpful to just scan through the poem and underline fancy literary techniques before you forget them, you don't want to be spending time reminiscing about the poem again)

    I prefer to start with the Frankenstein essay, as I tend to *slightly* overrun (i.e. 1hr 10mins vs 50 mins poetry), but I find it's worth it to give more developed critical views, as well as planning for the essay takes a longer time since the question is more probing than the same old poetry 'How does Yeats present [the main theme] in the poem? But I'd peek at the Yeats question first to let your subconscious think about the poem for an hour.

    And as always keep writing 'Shelley' does this, and 'Yeats' does that, as apparently examiners like that sort of stuff. Apparently fancy long words / phrases also help, my favourite is 'chthonic' lexical field - words pertaining to the underworld (and hence Paradise Lost)

    Finally, when using critics for Frankenstein, make sure you argue with / against the critic rather than just stating '[this bloke] thinks this', an easy way to make sure you 'engage' with them is if you find two opposing critics, you state both and then you can easily just explain whose side you're on

    e.g. Reason for Frankenstein's suffering:

    Anne Mellor - he pissed off Shelley and women - Frankenstein 'supports a patriarchal denial of the value of women and female sexuality'

    David Punter - he pissed off God - Frankenstein 'is doomed to perpetual life on earth' for committing 'the ultimate crime against God'
    cheers for the exam technique pointers, they're quality.

    But revision techniques to ace the test?
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    Doing the exam on Frankenstein and Yeats tomorrow

    What are everyones predictions for Yeats?

    And does anybody have any good notes, quotes or critics for Frankenstein? I have Anne Mellor but that is all.

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by bambamx)
    Is anyone doing emily dickinson poems and the turn of the screw?

    also if i got 35 marks (just an A) in my coursework, what would i need in the exam to get a B overall?
    35 marks translates to 80UMS, need 140UMS overall for a B, so 60/120 UMS in exam which is 34/60 (17 on each essay) - just on the D boundary.
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    (Original post by geogstudent)
    Doing the exam on Frankenstein and Yeats tomorrow

    What are everyones predictions for Yeats?

    And does anybody have any good notes, quotes or critics for Frankenstein? I have Anne Mellor but that is all.

    Thanks!
    I posted by notes at the bottom of page 9

    Yeats will probably be political, so Easter 1916 / September 1913... maybe Leda and the Swan or the Stolen child if more about subversion in general.

    Definitely not anything on reminiscing about past (Maude and love), as they're both heavy themes in Broken Dreams and Wild Swans which came up already.
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    35 marks translates to 80UMS, need 140UMS overall for a B, so 60/120 UMS in exam which is 34/60 (17 on each essay) - just on the D boundary.
    If I got 34/40 on my coursework how much do you think I'd need in the exam to get an A overall?
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    (Original post by NiallD)
    If I got 34/40 on my coursework how much do you think I'd need in the exam to get an A overall?
    Just because I'm Piguy, doesn't mean I have to do everyone's maths for them... Ok maybe it does:p:

    To get above 160/200 UMS (an A) overall, you need 54/60 (99/120 UMS) in the exam - thats 27 in each essay
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    (Original post by Piguy)
    Just because I'm Piguy, doesn't mean I have to do everyone's maths for them... Ok maybe it does:p:

    To get 160/200 UMS (an A) overall, you need 54/60 (99/120 UMS) in the exam - thats 27 in each essay
    Haha sorry, thanks so much I got 29/30 for my Yeats mock but only 20/30 for my Frankenstein mock so if I performed exactly the same that would put me at a B probably? Although we did our mocks about 4 weeks ago, and my Frankenstein knowledge was much weaker back then so hopefully I should perform better on it in the exam
 
 
 
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