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OCR B (Salters) F332 Tuesday 4th June 2013 Exam Discussion (Now Closed) Watch

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    (Original post by Branny101)
    Thanks mate I think I get it now, but also does this mean stereoisomerism can be between functional groups as well as side chains?

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    Stereoisomerism can occur on any chain that has a double C to C bond and two different groups (not functional groups) on each carbon atom, regardless on how long or short the chain is.
    The double bond can be anywhere on the chain.

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    how is everyone feeling about this exam?
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    (Original post by super121)
    Stereoisomerism can occur on any chain that has a double C to C bond and two different groups (not functional groups) on each carbon atom, regardless on how long or short the chain is.
    The double bond can be anywhere on the chain.

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    Ahh no I get it, awesome dude thanks

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    Q3a)i) Jan 2010 - why is the answer not co polymerisation? I thought it would be because the polymer's made of two difference monomers, so why is it addition?
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    (Original post by ambbs)
    Q3a)i) Jan 2010 - why is the answer not co polymerisation? I thought it would be because the polymer's made of two difference monomers, so why is it addition?
    Co-polymerisation is a type of addition polymer, because only once product is produced.
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    (Original post by super121)
    Co-polymerisation is a type of addition polymer, because only once product is produced.
    Ah okay, thanks
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    I don't quite understand ppm calculations? Can somebody help me with that. Like maybe tell me a basic structure/formula I can use to work them out?
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    I don't quite understand ppm calculations? Can somebody help me with that. Like maybe tell me a basic structure/formula I can use to work them out?
    % to ppm= multiply by 10,000
    ppm to %= divide by 10,000
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    I don't quite understand ppm calculations? Can somebody help me with that. Like maybe tell me a basic structure/formula I can use to work them out?
    Multiply by 10,000
    e.g. 0.0002% of methane would be 2ppm.

    To get ppb, you would multiply by 10,000,000
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    (Original post by super121)
    Multiply by 10,000
    e.g. 0.0002% of methane would be 2ppm.

    To get ppb, you would multiply by 10,000,000
    Thank you!

    how about when they ask about mass?
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Thank you!

    how about when they ask about mass?
    Same method


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    (Original post by abzy1234)
    % to ppm= multiply by 10,000
    ppm to %= divide by 10,000
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    Thanks!

    (Original post by super121)
    Same method


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    Can somebody please please please help me in this rock hard question
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2365732

    I'm so unsure with ionic equations
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    don't you think there is a LOT to remember in this exam like at the stuff about the halogens, atmosphere and reactions
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    (Original post by Welbeck)
    don't you think there is a LOT to remember in this exam like at the stuff about the halogens, atmosphere and reactions
    I agree, F332 is LOADED with so much content!
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    Hi can someone please help me with this part of the spec "Explain the risks associated with the storage and transport of the halogens (fluorine to iodine)"

    I've gone through all past paper mark schemes and can't compile a complete list. I know they are toxic/corrosive and that they should all be kept away from flames, but are there any specific ones for each halogen?

    Cheers
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    Are there any trends or patterns shown throughout the past papers? And does anyone have an sample questions for the pre-release? Thanks
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    (Original post by Aaaaa11111)
    Are there any trends or patterns shown throughout the past papers? And does anyone have an sample questions for the pre-release? Thanks
    Flick through the previous pages in this thread and you'll find them
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    (Original post by krisshP)
    Can somebody please please please help me in this rock hard question
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2365732

    I'm so unsure with ionic equations
    From the equation in the advanced notice, you can see that Na is a spectator ion, so just get rid of it. Then, split the reactants into ions (you know what chlorine in sodium chlorate had an oxidation state of 5 so it will be 2ClO3-). The same products form (minus sodium chloride), so all thats left to do is balance it.
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    (Original post by super121)
    From the equation in the advanced notice, you can see that Na is a spectator ion, so just get rid of it. Then, split the reactants into ions (you know what chlorine in sodium chlorate had an oxidation state of 5 so it will be 2ClO3-). The same products form (minus sodium chloride), so all thats left to do is balance it.
    Why is Na a spectator ion, is it because its oxidation state does not change?
 
 
 
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