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    (Original post by Zozzy)
    does anybody know where I could get a list of experiments which they could ask about in those long six mark questions because I've revised the ones which have appeared in past papers but of course those are the ones less likely to appear :/
    It's normally the experiments you've done in class over the year - like using a thermistor, or perhaps measuring the RMS using an oscilloscope. These are ones that have come up in the past and I doubt anything new will!
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    Hi guys,
    Can anyone help with lamp brightness info as just cant seem to understand !!!!!!
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    (Original post by Bixel)
    It's normally the experiments you've done in class over the year - like using a thermistor, or perhaps measuring the RMS using an oscilloscope. These are ones that have come up in the past and I doubt anything new will!
    I don't think they have repeated an experiment yet.
    And I did no experiments in lesson, fck.
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    I'm a bit confused about why increasing the frequency of the EM radiaion on a metal does not effect the number of electrons emitted? :confused:
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    (Original post by NLoR)
    I'm a bit confused about why increasing the frequency of the EM radiaion on a metal does not effect the number of electrons emitted? :confused:
    The intensity does The radiation will just give the electrons more Kinetic energy.

    increasing the frequency - increases the energy in each wave not the amount of waves hitting the metal itself
    However if intensity were increased (more waves) more electrons get hit

    Hope that makes sense
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    (Original post by NLoR)
    I'm a bit confused about why increasing the frequency of the EM radiaion on a metal does not effect the number of electrons emitted? :confused:
    There is a distinction between frequency and intensity. If the frequency of the incident light is below the threshold freq., then no matter how many of these you chuck at the metal, electrons will not be emmited. Intensity is just how many photons you're chucking at the metal per second. Frequency is a totally different thing, which is proportional to the energy of the photons. (e=hf)

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    (Original post by Tit)
    There is a distinction between frequency and intensity. If the frequency of the incident light is below the threshold freq., then no matter how many of these you chuck at the metal, electrons will not be emmited. Intensity is just how many photons you're chucking at the metal per second. Frequency is a totally different thing, which is proportional to the energy of the photons. (e=hf)

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    so the definition and use of frequency in photon like behaviour is different to that of in waves where an increase in frequency is an increase in the number of waves passing a point per second?
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    (Original post by dvc)
    Hi guys,
    Can anyone help with lamp brightness info as just can't seem to understand !!!!!!
    Brightness is given by the power dissipated i.e. p=iv or v2/r or i2r if that number is higher its bright if lower its dimmer
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    (Original post by posthumus)
    The intensity does The radiation will just give the electrons more Kinetic energy.

    increasing the frequency - increases the energy in each wave not the amount of waves hitting the metal itself
    However if intensity were increased (more waves) more electrons get hit

    Hope that makes sense
    thanks it did help! just still a little confused at the exact definition of frequency in this case
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    (Original post by NLoR)
    thanks it did help! just still a little confused at the exact definition of frequency in this case
    Frequency I think is oscillations per second... the more oscillations the more energy it has ! But anyway I think you should be more concerned with this E=hf ... as you can see the E is directly proportional to the frequency
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    (Original post by BenChard)
    Attachment 217006

    hey I am also doing this exam

    1) is it me or is most of the stuff needed for particles on the formula sheet anyway?
    2) does anyone have any tips on learning the units e.g. mega milli?
    3) I'm stuck in working out the voltage for C-D (attached)
    Some, not all of the stuff in on the data sheet.
    I don't really have any tips for it, I just memorised them.

    I presume that you have worked out the voltages for A-C (6V) and D-F (4) in the previous part so the question. Voltage is the potential DIFFERENCE. So all you do it 6-4 = 2V.

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    Does anyone have a copy of the Jan 13 paper and mark scheme?
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    What do we need to know in terms of diodes for the exam in calculations?


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    (Original post by NLoR)
    Does anyone have a copy of the Jan 13 paper and mark scheme?
    Here.
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA1-QP-Jan13.pdf (379.1 KB, 105 views)
  2. File Type: pdf AQA-PHYA1-W-MS-JAN13.pdf (126.5 KB, 124 views)
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    With 1 day 18 hours left what would you all say is your weakest topic/part of the paper?
    Mine: 6 markers followed by pesky 3 mark questions on how current or pd or something changes as something else changes. :/
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    (Original post by IWantSomeMushu)
    Here.
    Thank you!
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    (Original post by NabRoh)
    With 1 day 18 hours left what would you all say is your weakest topic/part of the paper?
    Mine: 6 markers followed by pesky 3 mark questions on how current or pd or something changes as something else changes. :/
    I'm very bad at the experiment questions because I'm self teaching and so have little practical experience.
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    Does a positron or an electron antineutrino have a lepton number of -1?

    It doesn't say in my textbook


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by Son234)
    Does a positron or an electron antineutrino have a lepton number of -1?

    It doesn't say in my textbook


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Yes they do.
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    (Original post by Son234)
    Does a positron or an electron antineutrino have a lepton number of -1?

    It doesn't say in my textbook


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Yep, this is in the formula sheet btw
 
 
 
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