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    do we need to know the 2nd new deal?
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    What about populism? Practically i dont know anything about them. Can someone explain me what they did and successes failures? Pleasee

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    (Original post by jacksplum)
    Does anyone have any idea whats likely to come up for question 1 and 2? i'm really nervous!!!
    Maybe something to do with an election (hasn't for a while)

    Progressives and populists

    KKK

    Extent of the boom
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    (Original post by muzika)
    What about populism? Practically i dont know anything about them. Can someone explain me what they did and successes failures? Pleasee

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    William Jennings Bryan was a Populist, however a Democrat by party.

    They were Silverites.

    Successes: Paved the way for the modern Democratic Party.

    Failures: Prog. Party overshadowed by William Jennings Bryan and the Democrats.

    Hardly anything in either textbook about them! Hopefully it's just a 12 marker
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    (Original post by abbythesmall)
    do we need to know the 2nd new deal?
    Yep
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Maybe something to do with an election (hasn't for a while)

    Progressives and populists

    KKK

    Extent of the boom

    so progressives were
    mckinnley, taft, roosevelt, wilson??

    what is it that the progressives stood for again?
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    1. (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
      Yep

    I just died in side...
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    Anyone who has got HIST1L Britain 1905-51 tommorow, any idea on predictions???
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    Can anyone have a look at this?

    Any idea of a grade?

    ---

    How successful were opponents of the New Deal in achieving their aims in the years 1933 to 1941? (24 marks)

    The opponents of the New Deal had mixed success. Some, such as the Supreme Court judges, enjoyed a successful opposition to the deal, whereas, others, like Coughlin initially had a lot of support but it declined. Huey Long was successful up until his assassination in 1935.

    The Supreme Court was very successful. Of the 9 judges, 5 opposed the New Deal and 4 supported it. When Evans was appointed Chief of Justice it made the opposition stronger. The Court blocked 11 of 16 New Deals, including the NRA and AAA. The reason for this was because they deemed some alphabet agencies unconstitutional. For instance, the AAA was banned because they believed it should be the job of local government to help farmers not federal. Many of FDR’s agencies were blocked and this demonstrated the success of the Courts in opposing the New Deal.

    Another, fairly successful, opponent to the New Deal was the “Radio Priest” Coughlin who initially supported the New Deal. He called it Christ’s deal. The main reason for his success was that he could influence 30 million of his listeners. If 30 million people were exposed to anti-New Deal rants it would be likely that they would not cooperate with agencies and voice opposition. Many people did voice their opposition because of Coughlin and, therefore, he was successful.

    However, Coughlin’s success was short lived. As the New Deal progressed many people had faith in it. Coughlin was gradually losing supporters. By 1941, there was little opposition to the New Deal, however, it could be argued that this was because the nation had been united by WWII, which started for the USA on 7 December 1941. Nonetheless, Coughlin lost many supporters and this shows he was also unsuccessful in opposing the New Deal.

    The final prominent opposition came from Huey Long. A Populist a Governor of Louisiana. He had his own ideas of boosting the economy, which included capping high-earners’ salary to $1 million and redistributing wealth to the poor. Long rallied a lot of support because of his idealistic policies and this led to more people opposing the New Deal. It was argued FDR only started a Second New Deal as he was scared of Long. Long was unsuccessful, however. In 1935 he was assassinated and this his vitriol and allowed FDR to progress with the New Deal. Therefore, Long was unsuccessful but only due to his death, he was a credible threat until he was shot.

    The opponents of the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. The Supreme Court enjoyed lots of success and managed to stop 11 of 16 alphabet agencies being passed. “Radio Priest” Coughlin was also successful. He rallied support from many of his 30 million listeners and these listeners acted by voicing opposition to the New Deal. However, Coughlin’s success died out very quickly as the New Deal became popular over time. By 1941, most were pro-New Deal as it appeared to be working. Another unsuccessful opponent was Huey Long. However, he was successful for a short time but his death in 1935 lessened the impact making him ultimately unsuccessful.

    To conclude, I believe the opponents to the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. However, there is no doubt the Supreme Court enjoyed the most success.
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    (Original post by Rahdip)
    Anyone who has got HIST1L Britain 1905-51 tommorow, any idea on predictions???
    thats not till next week..
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    (Original post by jacksplum)
    so progressives were
    mckinnley, taft, roosevelt, wilson??

    what is it that the progressives stood for again?
    Limited central government i believe

    Also conservation
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    Why can't someone's teacher be like Cameron Diaz in Bad Teacher and have sex with the AQA Head Examiner to get the questions and answers ;p
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Can anyone have a look at this?

    Any idea of a grade?

    ---

    How successful were opponents of the New Deal in achieving their aims in the years 1933 to 1941? (24 marks)

    The opponents of the New Deal had mixed success. Some, such as the Supreme Court judges, enjoyed a successful opposition to the deal, whereas, others, like Coughlin initially had a lot of support but it declined. Huey Long was successful up until his assassination in 1935.

    The Supreme Court was very successful. Of the 9 judges, 5 opposed the New Deal and 4 supported it. When Evans was appointed Chief of Justice it made the opposition stronger. The Court blocked 11 of 16 New Deals, including the NRA and AAA. The reason for this was because they deemed some alphabet agencies unconstitutional. For instance, the AAA was banned because they believed it should be the job of local government to help farmers not federal. Many of FDR’s agencies were blocked and this demonstrated the success of the Courts in opposing the New Deal.

    Another, fairly successful, opponent to the New Deal was the “Radio Priest” Coughlin who initially supported the New Deal. He called it Christ’s deal. The main reason for his success was that he could influence 30 million of his listeners. If 30 million people were exposed to anti-New Deal rants it would be likely that they would not cooperate with agencies and voice opposition. Many people did voice their opposition because of Coughlin and, therefore, he was successful.

    However, Coughlin’s success was short lived. As the New Deal progressed many people had faith in it. Coughlin was gradually losing supporters. By 1941, there was little opposition to the New Deal, however, it could be argued that this was because the nation had been united by WWII, which started for the USA on 7 December 1941. Nonetheless, Coughlin lost many supporters and this shows he was also unsuccessful in opposing the New Deal.

    The final prominent opposition came from Huey Long. A Populist a Governor of Louisiana. He had his own ideas of boosting the economy, which included capping high-earners’ salary to $1 million and redistributing wealth to the poor. Long rallied a lot of support because of his idealistic policies and this led to more people opposing the New Deal. It was argued FDR only started a Second New Deal as he was scared of Long. Long was unsuccessful, however. In 1935 he was assassinated and this his vitriol and allowed FDR to progress with the New Deal. Therefore, Long was unsuccessful but only due to his death, he was a credible threat until he was shot.

    The opponents of the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. The Supreme Court enjoyed lots of success and managed to stop 11 of 16 alphabet agencies being passed. “Radio Priest” Coughlin was also successful. He rallied support from many of his 30 million listeners and these listeners acted by voicing opposition to the New Deal. However, Coughlin’s success died out very quickly as the New Deal became popular over time. By 1941, most were pro-New Deal as it appeared to be working. Another unsuccessful opponent was Huey Long. However, he was successful for a short time but his death in 1935 lessened the impact making him ultimately unsuccessful.

    To conclude, I believe the opponents to the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. However, there is no doubt the Supreme Court enjoyed the most success.

    Loads of facts, my teacher would be impressed haha !!
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    (Original post by abbythesmall)
    thats not till next week..
    it is tommorow. i think i'd know since I've got it tommorow on my exam timetable.
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    (Original post by Xx4L3x)
    Loads of facts, my teacher would be impressed haha !!
    I have tried to learn some haha!

    Do you think that'd be a good essay or no?



    (Original post by Rahdip)
    it is tommorow. i think i'd know since I've got it tommorow on my exam timetable.
    You're right because it's Unit 1 - maybe the girl is confused
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    (Original post by Rahdip)
    it is tommorow. i think i'd know since I've got it tommorow on my exam timetable.
    Whoopes panicked though that was the british one i was doing . Sorry
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    I have tried to learn some haha!

    Do you think that'd be a good essay or no?





    You're right because it's Unit 1 - maybe the girl is confused
    I'm always confused sorry!
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    Don't think there's enough in the book for there to be a direct question on population/progressives

    My bets are on KKK, An election, 1920s boom and the stock market crash.
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    (Original post by chelseafan)
    Don't think there's enough in the book for there to be a direct question on population/progressives

    My bets are on KKK, An election, 1920s boom and the stock market crash.
    I hope there's nothing on prog or pop !

    There's been questions on dollar diplomacy before and there's a small bit on that so anything is possible
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Can anyone have a look at this?

    Any idea of a grade?

    ---

    How successful were opponents of the New Deal in achieving their aims in the years 1933 to 1941? (24 marks)

    The opponents of the New Deal had mixed success. Some, such as the Supreme Court judges, enjoyed a successful opposition to the deal, whereas, others, like Coughlin initially had a lot of support but it declined. Huey Long was successful up until his assassination in 1935.

    The Supreme Court was very successful. Of the 9 judges, 5 opposed the New Deal and 4 supported it. When Evans was appointed Chief of Justice it made the opposition stronger. The Court blocked 11 of 16 New Deals, including the NRA and AAA. The reason for this was because they deemed some alphabet agencies unconstitutional. For instance, the AAA was banned because they believed it should be the job of local government to help farmers not federal. Many of FDR’s agencies were blocked and this demonstrated the success of the Courts in opposing the New Deal.

    Another, fairly successful, opponent to the New Deal was the “Radio Priest” Coughlin who initially supported the New Deal. He called it Christ’s deal. The main reason for his success was that he could influence 30 million of his listeners. If 30 million people were exposed to anti-New Deal rants it would be likely that they would not cooperate with agencies and voice opposition. Many people did voice their opposition because of Coughlin and, therefore, he was successful.

    However, Coughlin’s success was short lived. As the New Deal progressed many people had faith in it. Coughlin was gradually losing supporters. By 1941, there was little opposition to the New Deal, however, it could be argued that this was because the nation had been united by WWII, which started for the USA on 7 December 1941. Nonetheless, Coughlin lost many supporters and this shows he was also unsuccessful in opposing the New Deal.

    The final prominent opposition came from Huey Long. A Populist a Governor of Louisiana. He had his own ideas of boosting the economy, which included capping high-earners’ salary to $1 million and redistributing wealth to the poor. Long rallied a lot of support because of his idealistic policies and this led to more people opposing the New Deal. It was argued FDR only started a Second New Deal as he was scared of Long. Long was unsuccessful, however. In 1935 he was assassinated and this his vitriol and allowed FDR to progress with the New Deal. Therefore, Long was unsuccessful but only due to his death, he was a credible threat until he was shot.

    The opponents of the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. The Supreme Court enjoyed lots of success and managed to stop 11 of 16 alphabet agencies being passed. “Radio Priest” Coughlin was also successful. He rallied support from many of his 30 million listeners and these listeners acted by voicing opposition to the New Deal. However, Coughlin’s success died out very quickly as the New Deal became popular over time. By 1941, most were pro-New Deal as it appeared to be working. Another unsuccessful opponent was Huey Long. However, he was successful for a short time but his death in 1935 lessened the impact making him ultimately unsuccessful.

    To conclude, I believe the opponents to the New Deal were both successful and unsuccessful. However, there is no doubt the Supreme Court enjoyed the most success.
    This may be just me but i was told never to use first person pronouns like "I" or "to conclude." The second to last paragraph is a great conclusion and the last bit isnt needed (just in my opinion) seriously good essay btw
 
 
 
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