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Do people have the moral 'right' to call each other fat? Watch

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    (Original post by CaptainDudeson)
    I have the right to say whatever I damn well like you frightful man you.
    You can say it but don't expect anyone to take you seriously.
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    (Original post by Iron Lady)
    Yes, but why is size so different to someone's haircut or perfume? They're all personal choices.
    Does a haircut or perfume affect your health? Your mood? Your fitness?
    Yes, it is a choice. A choice in which they only lose out, so why have they done it?

    Just because someone is fat it doesn't mean they're costing people money (if they are, they should pay for it themselves) or they're going to drop dead due to being or having a health hazard.
    The NHS would like to have a word with you.
    Sure, not all fat people will, but a lot do and many do cost the taxpayer money as their on going problems eg diabetes, blood pressure, depression meds etc need constant medication.
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    (Original post by CaptainDudeson)
    There is nothing wrong with being fat if it is out of ones control. Fatsos by choice on the other hand...
    Frankly I don't care if it's caused by disease or not. I've seen first hand the negative effects caused by people like you who think they're above others just cause they're slimmer than them. No one likes to be called fat. When you mutter those words thinking you're 'helping' them, all you're doing is damaging their self worth and their ability to interact with society.
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    This has turned out to be an argument about whether or not being fat is 'bad' which isn't actually what the title of the thread is about. But if you're fat I don't see the need for special protection from this descriptor so long as it's not used to bully someone. Simply referring to someone as fat should be as acceptable as referring to someone as skinny.
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    (Original post by Pride)
    Do you think so?

    What is the cost to society of malnutrition? What is the cost to society of smoking? Of drinking? Billions of pounds in the form of NHS expenditure - a wide range of possible conditions including diabetes, angina, cirrhosis I could go on and on. Then also, anti-social behaviour and vandalism, perhaps missing out on good education, disability and therefore unemployment, passive smoking.

    What about the impact on the person's relatives (in terms of passive smoking, time spent in hospital and/or providing paid/unpaid care, the loss of a premature death etc.)

    These things don't only affect the people who do them.

    I'm not saying that doctors (and everyone else) should publically judge the overweight, the smokers and the heavy drinkers - people make bad decisions, where does it end if doctors start putting people down for every flaw? I just think it's silly to assume that you can do any crap you want to your body as long as you're alright with the personal consequences. What about the society?
    I don't think fat people (note not obese people) cause more negative externalities than heavy alcohol users and addicted smokers, but I do agree there are some costs and the heavily obese should have some motivation for change, but I hate that society has being shaped to suggest that a little over normal is bad. My sister has this thing where she's perfectly healthy but feels fat when shes below average :confused:, its a bit stupid tbh that people are expected to follow a common weight, a little over average is fine, far over average is bad far below average is anorexic- so obviously bad
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    (Original post by ashleighgiles)
    Morbid obesity is real "fat" in my opinion. When someone have trouble breathing, moving, etc. then that's when the person needs to be reminded of their health and the risks it brings. Being reminded is different from being insulted. But then again, some people are extremely sensitive when it comes to words.
    If they are having difficulty breathing, moving, etc. then they know they need to lose weight. They don't need smug nannies and Perfect Peters telling them what to do, when they already know. You're reinforcing the issue and actually making it worse.

    People who are overconfident with themselves tend to put "fat" people down, mainly because it makes them feel better.
    Then they are not confident, but insecure, truly confident people do not need to put others down to reinforce their confidence. That's bullying and wrong.

    This doesn't mean they're fit themselves too. If a chubby person is happy with how he/she is, then leave them be. They'll know when its time to change.
    If they're merely chubby why should they change? No health issues, no difficulty breathing or moving, no problems. Unless you want them to be just like everyone else.

    And back to the OP, there is no right to be rude. However, being straight-forward at the right time can be necessary.
    But why is it necessary when they're not oblivious to their own weight? I don't think it's offensive, but I do think it's the nanny state telling people to keep their weight under control, when people aren't dumb.
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    CaptainDudeson is a low from UAE from a below-standard university, graduated with a pass in all of his university modules in his chosen degree on sports/personal training (/ some **** you don't need university for) he then uses his almighty wisdom to offer apparent advice on the internet about how being fat is morally wrong and costing the NHS a lot, I suppose with CaptainDudeson's ambitions and a half-arsed degree he's costing the tax-payer more as he can't pay his university fee's back, now I agree with him on some points, but his generalisations are so damn annoying, I'll admit I'm a bit over the average weight but not obese, obesity is a problem, a bit of fatness is not however. I walk to school do some running, study hard and work hard. Just because someone's fat, it doesn't mean that they are of less worth than other contributors in society, in fact unless a job requires physical stamina, fat people can be just as productive as healthy people. I don't honestly see why hes going on an internet crusade to slam all the fat people as being immoral, when his presence here and his words are immoral
    (Original post by justinawe)
    UAE is a country mate, not a uni
    You intellectually inept *******. You spent a while coming up with all that didn't you?

    I have never studied anything to do with sports or personal training, nor do I work in that field. Your assumptions about me are totally innaccurate.
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    (Original post by CaptainDudeson)
    You intellectually inept *******. You spent a while coming up with all that didn't you?

    I have never studied anything to do with sports or personal training, nor do I work in that field.Your assumptions about me are totally innaccurate.
    Right
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    (Original post by Gjaykay)
    I say live and let live tbh.
    Isn't it more live and let die of diabetes in this case?

    You can't do that if its someone you care about!
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    (Original post by rachamy)
    Cannot be arsed to read through 8 pages of mindless drivel in this thread.
    Why should "fat" people be judged based on their weight? The way I've seen a couple of comments which seem like people are talking about fat people like they're animals, not human and like they don't have feelings. Which for one is ****ing rude.
    Not all fat people are unhealthy, end of.
    It's sometimes not a fat persons fault that they can't lose weight, sometimes it's due to hormone imbalances, genetic conditions etc.
    So what if you have a dislike for fat people, what do you actually get from telling them you dislike them? It's not going to change how they are.
    Fat people could say they don't like skinny people, that skinny people are unhealthy and unattractive too.
    Let people live their lives how they want.

    Inb4 you're fat, because I am, so what.
    Also, one story, a few months ago I was in McDonald's with my friend, some guys were laughing and being all "what is that fat lass doing here? Should be to the gym", funnily enough I go to the gym regularly, once while at the gym, some guys were sniggering and being all "what is that fat lass doing in here sweating her tits off on a treadmill?" So I can't win.

    Some people are just idiotic ********s, as a lot of people on here are.

    Why is is even a discussion?


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    well, not really.... If by 'fat' we mean 'overweight', then yes, the person might not be unhealthy, but remaining 'fat' increases the risk of developing weight-related problems (like CHD and all the other things).

    I'm not saying that people should be bullying fat people by the way.
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    (Original post by Tyrion_Lannister)
    You can say it but don't expect anyone to take you seriously.
    Plenty of people do take my comments seriously.
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    (Original post by ashleighgiles)
    I couldn't be bothered to read every single page in this thread.
    Fat is tentative. Some people are influenced by the media that fat is above size zero. So even a bit of muffin top on that tummy is already considered fat to the general society.
    That's not even true and is completely sensationalist (never mind the fact that size zero doesn't effectively exist in this country). No one thinks muffin top makes someone fat and if anything magazines nowadays praise female celebs for their 'curves'. If anything general society is becoming more accepting of the idea that being fat is normal as people consider size 14 and 16 to be so just because it is the average. We don't have a malnourishment problem in this country but an obesity one so there's no point arguing to the contrary.
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    (Original post by Pride)
    Do you think so?

    What is the cost to society of malnutrition? What is the cost to society of smoking? Of drinking? Billions of pounds in the form of NHS expenditure - a wide range of possible conditions including diabetes, angina, cirrhosis I could go on and on. Then also, anti-social behaviour and vandalism, perhaps missing out on good education, disability and therefore unemployment, passive smoking.

    What about the impact on the person's relatives (in terms of passive smoking, time spent in hospital and/or providing paid/unpaid care, the loss of a premature death etc.)

    These things don't only affect the people who do them.

    I'm not saying that doctors (and everyone else) should publically judge the overweight, the smokers and the heavy drinkers - people make bad decisions, where does it end if doctors start putting people down for every flaw? I just think it's silly to assume that you can do any crap you want to your body as long as you're alright with the personal consequences. What about the society?
    Do you work for the health industry by any chance?
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    (Original post by firewater)
    Frankly I don't care if it's caused by disease or not. I've seen first hand the negative effects caused by people like you who think they're above others just cause they're slimmer than them. No one likes to be called fat. When you mutter those words thinking you're 'helping' them, all you're doing is damaging their self worth and their ability to interact with society.
    Contrary to popular belief I do not go around calling people fat. I don't think that I am above others because I am slimmer than them, I think I'm above others because I have enough self control to not be fat.
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    But some people are fat. And that's a fact.

    Obviously though, telling someone they're fat point blank will always sound malicious. The only time it doesn't sound malicious is when a doctor/health professional is the one giving out advice and even then they use 'overweight' as opposed to 'fat'.
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    (Original post by xStaceyy)
    I used to get 'Wow, you're really pretty for a big girl' haha! Eh, NOT a compliment!

    Now that I've lost weight I feel better and I'd rather someone told me if I looked like I was putting on a bit, just so I can keep up with my healthier lifestyle.
    But yeah, I see where you're coming from.
    Absolutely agree with this. I find it ridiculously hard to notice when I gain a fair amount of body fat before it's too late and then it's just a big hassle to step up my exercise and control calories to get it off again. If I were in control of my weight loss (by being in an active job and regularly taking part in exercise so I knew it was in progress) then I might be offended at the assumption that I wasn't doing anything about it, but while I'm unemployed and largely sedentary it's quite difficult for me to see just how much extra body fat I'm carrying compared to normal (not so when I realise I can't get into a specific pair of jeans anymore).
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    Right
    Right indeed.
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    (Original post by Jimbo1234)
    Does a haircut or perfume affect your health? Your mood? Your fitness?
    Yes, it is a choice. A choice in which they only lose out, so why have they done it?
    It's not a case of "be slim then you'll be happy, gorgeous and eternally happy... or lose out you poor, overweight sod" (lose out on what exactly, the last time I checked there isn't an agreement on how you need to look for success, relationships, jobs, etc.) and they do not need to explain themselves to you.

    The NHS would like to have a word with you.
    Sure, not all fat people will, but a lot do and many do cost the taxpayer money as their on going problems eg diabetes, blood pressure, depression meds etc need constant medication.
    Then they pay for it themselves? Stop making things up to justify your aggressively-anti-anything-you're-not stance.
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    (Original post by Robbie242)
    I don't think fat people (note not obese people) cause more negative externalities than heavy alcohol users and addicted smokers, but I do agree there are some costs and the heavily obese should have some motivation for change, but I hate that society has being shaped to suggest that a little over normal is bad. My sister has this thing where she's perfectly healthy but feels fat when shes below average :confused:, its a bit stupid tbh that people are expected to follow a common weight, a little over average is fine, far over average is bad far below average is anorexic- so obviously bad
    I agree. But that's society for you, it's kinda inevitable really. On the TV, people mostly see people with perfect bodies in perfect proportion. Blemishes airbrushed out, people build up an idea that everyone should look a certain way. If people in the media aren't perfect, it's probably for comedic effect or because they are older - Miranda Hart comes to mind.
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    (Original post by CaptainDudeson)
    Right indeed.
    Indeed right. You did come across very malicious in your first few posts but I think you mean well, those equal signs I disagree with but I do understand 'some of your later posts' but not all of them. I know I feel stupid for making stupid assumptions and forgetting that UAE is a country. Right indeed.
 
 
 
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