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Why are creative degrees less respected? watch

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    (Original post by blurrygirl)
    I think this is a pretty interesting topic. A lot of people seem to be of the view that the arts are useless hobbies that don't contribute to society and aren't as important as science because you can teach them to yourself.
    I'm pretty sure anyone who thinks you could teach, say, the violin, to yourself, has probably never tried. I don't know much about art, but I know a bit about music, so i'll stick to that. Music really is a discipline that you have to work at. Not to say that science isnt...
    But to learn an instrument, you have to be dedicated, you have to work hard, you have to be committed to doing well, and to a certain extent you have to be a bit of a perfectionist. These are transferable skills that you can develop from the arts. Music also teaches you respect, you have to respect your instrument and your teacher. In an orchestra, you have to respect your conductor and the rest of the musicians. So i definitely think music contributes to society because of the skills, other than musical skills, that it helps you to develop. So in theory, the more you study the subject, the more your skills will develop.
    I really do think things like music and art and drama contribute in a hugely important way. no, playing the recorder won't change the world and cure diseases and make everyone happy, but hey, who says every scientist will do things like that either? Going to space and telling us whats there may be interesting, but does it change the way we live, does it affect us? not really. we just know a bit more.
    I've heard of things like music and art therapy, which help all sorts of people in all sorts of ways. if no one studied the arts, who would do these jobs? and if no one did these jobs, what would happen to the people who really benefit from them?
    As you can probably tell, I'm not a scientist. But I don't study an arts subject either.
    I study linguistics, a cross between the two (im sure many will disagree that is its a cross,but it is. It's known as the scientific study of language) so its both creative and theoretical.
    Like i said, interesting topic!
    You develop exactly the same set of skills in any subject. If you think you can pass an engineering degree with discipline and striving to get everything 100% right, you are very wrong. I had over 30 hours of contact time in my first year, with significant solo study, coursework etc. And if I dropped below 60% on any module, my degree may not have been acreditted. If you think getting a first class in that environment doesnt require as much effort or discipline as learn an instrument, i invite you to prove me wrong.

    Secondly, things like the MRI machine are a direct result of our research into subatomic particles. Space travel pushes us to research problems that can have a direct result on things like aviation and engine technology. Imaginary numbers have a fundamental meaning in electronics and many other areas, and they were a purely mathematical concept with absolutely no physical meaning when they were defined/discovered.

    Improvements in computation techniques mean we can predict complex system like the weather with more accuracy, and we are starting to see the first glimpses of simulations of drug formulations rather than having to rely upon time consuming lab based trials. We use algorithms to predict crime, understand how disease will spread and evaluate the outcome of complex events, such as multiple disasters.

    Observing space may seem like an interest only field, but the increased knowledge of our universe helps us understand how our solar system acts, predict the trajectory of asteroids that may collide with us, and understand how our planet works.

    It is only by undertaking this 'interesting but useless' research that we can create a gps network that positions us to within a metre or so. If we did not know about general relativity (which was confirmed by studying the sun, in part), we would not be able to do this.
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    Musicology is solid as ****, bro. It's not all listening to music and composing and playing songs. Lots of complex, rigorous academic stuff to it.
    I was half trolling here, read my further few posts for my main response to the thread
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    (Original post by AreebWithaHat)
    I was half trolling here, read my further few posts for my main response to the thread
    Nah, I believe you. Cba going back to look.
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    (Original post by c471)
    You develop exactly the same set of skills in any subject. If you think you can pass an engineering degree with discipline and striving to get everything 100% right, you are very wrong. I had over 30 hours of contact time in my first year, with significant solo study, coursework etc. And if I dropped below 60% on any module, my degree may not have been acreditted. If you think getting a first class in that environment doesnt require as much effort or discipline as learn an instrument, i invite you to prove me wrong.

    Secondly, things like the MRI machine are a direct result of our research into subatomic particles. Space travel pushes us to research problems that can have a direct result on things like aviation and engine technology. Imaginary numbers have a fundamental meaning in electronics and many other areas, and they were a purely mathematical concept with absolutely no physical meaning when they were defined/discovered.

    Improvements in computation techniques mean we can predict complex system like the weather with more accuracy, and we are starting to see the first glimpses of simulations of drug formulations rather than having to rely upon time consuming lab based trials. We use algorithms to predict crime, understand how disease will spread and evaluate the outcome of complex events, such as multiple disasters.

    Observing space may seem like an interest only field, but the increased knowledge of our universe helps us understand how our solar system acts, predict the trajectory of asteroids that may collide with us, and understand how our planet works.

    It is only by undertaking this 'interesting but useless' research that we can create a gps network that positions us to within a metre or so. If we did not know about general relativity (which was confirmed by studying the sun, in part), we would not be able to do this.
    To the bit in bold, I obviously didn't express myself particularly well, as I'm not suggesting it doesn't require as much effort as learning an instrument at all, I understand that science and maths degrees require a lot of hard work! There's no denying that at all.
    Also, someone else picked me up on my space travel thing, telling me that the technology used has a big affect on how we live. This is what I replied to whoever it was that said that .

    "That's a really good point, I never considered how the technology is used here too, as silly as that sounds! I guess I was just trying to express that I think a lot of people see science and maths as the be all and end all, but there is a really important place in society for creative arts as well. They don't do the same job, they're not important in the same ways, but I think they're both really important, and both contribute to society in equally massive ways. So I think you definitely need both, and I'm not sure its fair to say one is better than the other. Slightly off topic, I know."
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    (Original post by Occams Chainsaw)
    Following on from a thread I saw from a couple of month ago I wondered why we have this divide where subjects like art, music and creative writing are seen to be less respected.

    I enjoy delving in these areas in my spare time and I am more impressed with somebody's ability to create a striking piece of art or compose an evocative piece or music or write something that makes me laugh than their knowledge of the 16th century.

    I understand that this respect is probably more related to academic rigor than how 'impressive' the things you can do after studying a subject are but in the only example of a degree that is both creative and respected that I can think of - Architecture - I don't see what makes it different to the other arts? Is it merely the fact that it's a professional degree? Are there any other degrees that you consider to be academic yet creative?
    Because the world doesn't need as many creative people as there is supply and the world needs more doers and thinkers so thats why creativity isn't respected. Think about building a bridge. You need one good designer, and then 20 engineers and 150 construction workers to finish the project.
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    I'm in my 2nd year studying Film Production, and for me, it was a no-brainer to study the subject at uni.

    Firstly, film-making is the most innately expensive of all the art forms, and studying at uni gives me access to equipment worth thousands of pounds which I'd otherwise have to be rich enough to buy or hire. As I don't come from a wealthy family that would not be an option, so I'd be unable to self-teach effectively.

    Secondly, while studying any subject you get to study it for full time hours, meaning you learn a lot more in a shorter space of time than you would by self-studying.

    Thirdly, I've met like-minded people on both my own course and on related courses, and is a great opportunity to begin building your professional network.

    I made 3 short films before starting my course (all of which were questionable technically), and the quality of my work has increased enormously in the year and a bit since I started formal study of the subject.
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    (Original post by CJKay)
    How many popular musicians who took a music degree do you know?

    [/I]
    Most music degrees are oriented towards contemporary or classical performance, composition, musicology - not necessarily pop music.

    P.S. The vast majority of the people in the background of your favourite pop song - the songwriters, the producers, the sessions musicians, will have had formal training.
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    Lol that awkward moment when there was an entire revolution based on the arts.
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    (Original post by Book_Lover_23)
    How is it a waste of money? The majority of musicians and artists earn FAR more than physicists or such like. They're earning millions and physicists are on what, £30k a year? Who picked the better degree? Yes there's an element of luck in there, as there's no guarantee they'll become a successful artist. But if they want to try and devote their life to their hobby, why shouldn't they pursue a degree in it?



    Yes but you need someone to teach you to ride a bike or drive a car, just like you'd need someone to teach you to play an instrument. And you don't necessarily need taught the complex content in science subjects - textbooks explain it the same way the teacher does.




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    Well said. 👌
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    (Original post by Book_Lover_23)
    How is it a waste of money? The majority of musicians and artists earn FAR more than physicists or such like. They're earning millions and physicists are on what, £30k a year?

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    You know the majority of performing artists barely earn minimum wage? It's feast or famine, and you're using selection bias to misrepresent the best .01% as the majority.

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    (Original post by User990473)
    You try composing something or writing a poem. Failing that, get a physicist to do it.
    I have no higher education qualifications in art or writing. In about a year of starting writing and doing digital art, I managed to earn £100+ and wrote a short story that has over 5K reads. I won three informal writing competitions and came second in a poetry one, despite no previous writing experience.
    It is not that difficult at all for someone to do basic research or training to improve in those areas. They are seen more as hobbies, not careers. And even someone who has a qualification may never be successful if they're not naturally creative. Most successful artists and writers do not have any creative qualifications so it's not a necessity.
 
 
 
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