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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    Smart grads who understand what the employers want have the highest chance of employment.
    Fixed.
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    To reiterate my previous posts.

    DO. PERSONAL. PROJECTS

    I'm still completely baffled at how hard this is to understand.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    As long as it's not Comic Sans!
    Or Times New Roman or Arial. Actually text in general looks awful in Windows pre-8.

    (Original post by jacktrex)
    My CV didn't even have a work experience section, I just replaced it entirely with a projects section and employers seemed happy.
    What was it for? Web Dev? .NET Dev?

    (Original post by AlphaGroup)
    I am looking at it from the other side and have found it extremely difficult to find IT graduates who are actually interested in IT and looking for jobs. We have graduate roles but can't find the right people to fill them.
    What exactly do you mean by "IT grad"?
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    What exactly do you mean by "IT grad"?

    Anyone who has graduated from a Computer Science or computer / IT related uni course
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    Ugh I'm hoping to go into Computer Science.... Do I take any of this seriously :/
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    (Original post by Someboady)
    Ugh I'm hoping to go into Computer Science.... Do I take any of this seriously :/
    Don't. Just make sure you attend loads of events and do some projects outside of university and you'll be fine.
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    I'm not worried.
    "only 13% study in the Russell Group"

    CS obviously suffers a very low quality of candidates. I had not noticed this because I've been looking at grad opportunities from the top tier universities. Not only are grad employment rates excellent, but a large proportion of the time, average starting salaries are over £30k. There's nothing to worry about.
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    (Original post by edothero)
    Don't. Just make sure you attend loads of events and do some projects outside of university and you'll be fine.
    okay, any suggestions for projects/events?
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    (Original post by Someboady)
    okay, any suggestions for projects/events?
    If you go on MLH's (Major League Hacking) website you can see all events around you when it comes to hackathons. As for normal events I guess your university's CS society or something would keep you posted
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    (Original post by Someboady)
    okay, any suggestions for projects/events?
    and get work experience. If your uni doesn't offer a placement year then get googling IT companies and find out if they either have a structured summer placement programme or someone you can contact about the possibility of an informal placement.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    What was it for? Web Dev? .NET Dev?
    Java, C, Javascript.
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    I'm studying Computer Science and do some projects on the side. Looking for a tech internship in the US this summer. Anyone have any tips?
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    I'm not worried.
    "only 13% study in the Russell Group"

    CS obviously suffers a very low quality of candidates. I had not noticed this because I've been looking at grad opportunities from the top tier universities. Not only are grad employment rates excellent, but a large proportion of the time, average starting salaries are over £30k. There's nothing to worry about.
    Lol, this post contradicts pretty much every study I've ever seen and the average starting salary exceeds even the experience of the most optimistic posters on here.
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    (Original post by jacktrex)
    Java, C, Javascript.
    What was your role? Looks like a mix of web dev and low-level stuff.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    What was your role? Looks like a mix of web dev and low-level stuff.
    Oh you mean what job I was applying for? Various roles from Java developer to Cyber security or general software engineer.
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Lol, this post contradicts pretty much every study I've ever seen and the average starting salary exceeds even the experience of the most optimistic posters on here.
    My post is based directly from the official statistics published by top universities, as are the average starting salaries. Off the top of my head, they start around £24k and peak at Cambridge and Imperial at around £37k. Did you mean the article that was linked to on page 1?
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    My post is based directly from the official statistics published by top universities, as are the average starting salaries. Off the top of my head, they start around £24k and peak at Cambridge and Imperial at around £37k. Did you mean the article that was linked to on page 1?
    The highest starting salary for a grad techie is around £45 k in UK and £60k in US (100k $ (Silicon Valley))
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    (Original post by TrojanH)
    The highest starting salary for a grad techie is around £45 k in UK and £60k in US (100k $ (Silicon Valley))
    Yeah, sucks because Google, Amazon etc all pay 30% less here than they do in the US. Something to do with the cost of labour/competition for talent being lower. Apparently the Zurich office for Google is the highest for pay.

    + obvs these companies pay stock grants that vest over 3-4 years too.

    My friend's Google offer (he goes to Stanford) was ~$105k + 15% bonus + 250 Google stock units (or ~$150k at the time, vesting over 4 years so: $37.5k/year). All-in about ~$158k first year which is pretty close to what banks are paying for first year top performers in NY

    EDIT: There was a sign on bonus of $20k too.

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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Comp Sci (and the people that study it) as a degree discipline pisses me off sometimes.

    It's a generalist degree that trains you in a thin veneer of everything, so that after 3 years, you know how an operating system works and how to do basic for loops in a piece of code. It does not qualify you to do anything. A couple of modules does not an expert make. What employers are looking for is a level of dedication and expertise from the people they're hiring. Software developers are highly in demand, but what are not in demand are apprentice software developers that take 4 weeks to write a 2 day piece of code, don't know how to interpret requirements and read a design document, and haven't got the first clue about delivering projects and working in the real world.

    It frustrates me that people, especially from more traditional universities, see: good honours degree + skills shortage = £££££££ This is not a true reflection of the real world at all. Similarly, it annoys me that the same people don't consider less traditional disciplines in IT. I personally think that you have to start specialising your skills in this field at an early age to progress. Yes, it closes doors, but if you pick sensibly, you can end up with essentially a job for life and rapid career progression. Programming is boring, in my personal opinion. As is working with DB's and web development. Some people find this interesting, so I'm not going to criticise people for wanting to get into these (relatively financially rewarding) fields. However, there is more out there than this, but you have to specialise and commit to it. Infosec/Cyber is an area that is grossly under-resourced at the moment. Companies are offering silly money for people with the right skills in this area, but yet so few people are even considering it because it doesn't fit with the cookie cutter Comp Sci graduate prospectus. Half the trouble here is that if you're smart and have good A-Levels and are into IT, you're funnelled in to the Comp Sci path, especially where top unis are concerned, yet these courses teach you very little in the way of practical employability, skills and certainly don't give you any specialism, which causes you then to miss out on the opportunity to pursue specialist careers, as, ironically, you get pipped to the post by people like me, from (comparatively) lowly universities doing non-traditional, practical degrees.
    I can see what you mean, I am going into comp sci next year and it has crossed my mind that many of my peers will be just doing the subject because it puts food on the table. xD
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    My friend's Google offer (he goes to Stanford) was ~$105k + 15% bonus + 250 Google stock units (or ~$150k at the time, vesting over 4 years so: $37.5k/year). All-in about ~$158k first year which is pretty close to what banks are paying for first year top performers in NY.

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    :zomg:
 
 
 
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