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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Yes and what's worse is you're constantly being told by the media, other men, sometimes women, etc etc, that you're wrong for even letting it bother you in the first place. And as far as I can see this is pretty much why men end up killing themselves or acting aggressively and all the other bad stuff we do
    That's quite upsetting really it's bringing my maternal side out. Talking about stuff really does lighten the load, but as far as i know men don't do that with each other. Which means if a guy isn't very sociable with girls - which tbh can be part of his troubles i imagine - then he's quite limited with who he feels he can talk to.
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    (Original post by civilstudent)
    You have to live with the vulnerability of being the 'weaker' sex, it's harder to be independant/single ie going out alone at night, you get men rubbing it in your face how much weaker women are compared to them, you have all the hassle of pregnancy (all that hard work at the gym lost) and giving birth whilst men can just relax, keep their bodies in shape and be presented with a nice little baby at the end.

    As a tomboy who likes to work out/keep in shape and wants to stay single I can't find any advantages to being female!
    There are downsides to being either gender. Like others have said, there's a big stigma against talking about your feelings if you're a guy. I think equality has come a long long way in the past century, 100 years ago we couldn't even vote in the UK so that's a bonus. But there's still stuff to be done, I think a lot of the discrimination between genders nowadays is far more subtle than it once was.

    Don't get me started on going out alone at night. I'm a night owl, it would be nice to be able to go to the library without having to make sure I'm out by the time it's the last bus or risk the walk home alone, either way I have to go up my street in the pitch black.
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    get a sex change then, innit
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    There are downsides to being either gender. Like others have said, there's a big stigma against talking about your feelings if you're a guy. I think equality has come a long long way in the past century, 100 years ago we couldn't even vote in the UK so that's a bonus. But there's still stuff to be done, I think a lot of the discrimination between genders nowadays is far more subtle than it once was.

    Don't get me started on going out alone at night. I'm a night owl, it would be nice to be able to go to the library without having to make sure I'm out by the time it's the last bus or risk the walk home alone, either way I have to go up my street in the pitch black.
    Millions of men couldn't vote either. An entire generation of young british men had to be butchered in no man's land for all men to get the vote along with millions of women. All women got the full voting rights in 1928, only 10 years later. Without having to sacrifice an entire generation of their own gender.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)

    I've been told it hurts to be hit in the breasts but I've never seen a women fall to floor gasping for breath due to something hitting her there hard.

    They don't have their organs hanging on the outside of their body. It's like if your kidneys were hanging on the outside. Bloody fussy sperm
    I'm sure it hurts more for us guys to get hit in the nuts for sure but having said that:
    1) I saw a girl get hit in the boobs and cry once and I've heard girls say how much it hurts to get hit there.

    2) One of my flatmates (girl) jokingly kicked another of my flatmates in the fanny and she dropped and covered herself like a guy. She said it only hurt because she got hit in the clit.

    So I guess we have the most sensitive weak spot but girls have two to make up for it I guess
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    (Original post by StevieA)
    Millions of men couldn't vote either. An entire generation of young british men had to be butchered in no man's land for all men to get the vote along with millions of women. All women got the full voting rights in 1928, only 10 years later. Without having to sacrifice an entire generation of their own gender.
    It was crap being working class, essentially. The first world war was horrendous, and there was hideous loss of life of both sides, primarily for men. We've made progress with class as well as gender equality, which is what I was referring to (I should've made that specific). I suppose we have the NHS and there was the rise of the welfare state but just look at the present government, there's still a hell of a lot of class discrimination even if people won't admit it. And higher education is more widely available but then where our parents generation had essentially a free uni education (and in Scotland still do), we're saddled with massive uni fees again so we've taken a step back thanks to the recession. But it's a hell of a lot better than 1914.
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    I understand where you are coming from, like its definitely harder being female due to the inequalities that still exist and the double standards etc etc

    However, I love the fact that we can be both feminine and tomboyish and still be seen as hot. I love the relationship that I can have with my girlfriends - I don't really feel pressure to be someone that I'm not (although I appreciate it might not be the same for all girls)

    Yeah childbirth is gruesome, but having seen births and met new mums I think motherhood for most ladies is a blessing and a beautiful relationship

    Its a choice, you can lament on all the tough things about being a woman or work on yourself physically and mentally and become a bad ass hot momma. I know which one I'm choosing...
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    It was crap being working class, essentially. The first world war was horrendous, and there was hideous loss of life of both sides, primarily for men. We've made progress with class as well as gender equality, which is what I was referring to (I should've made that specific). I suppose we have the NHS and there was the rise of the welfare state but just look at the present government, there's still a hell of a lot of class discrimination even if people won't admit it. And higher education is more widely available but then where our parents generation had essentially a free uni education (and in Scotland still do), we're saddled with massive uni fees again so we've taken a step back thanks to the recession. But it's a hell of a lot better than 1914.
    If by primarily you mean almost 100% of WW1 UK dead and horrifically injured were men, then I agree. We're talking millions combined. Men made 99% of the sacrifices yet both genders got the vote soon after.
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    (Original post by StevieA)
    If by primarily you mean almost 100% of WW1 UK dead and horrifically injured were men, then I agree. We're talking millions combined. Men made 99% of the sacrifices yet both genders got the vote soon after.
    When you put it like that it sounds like you don't think women deserve the vote because it was the men who died in the war. In the case of men, it's a class issue first, gender doesn't come into it. With women, you've got the gender issues to overcome, followed by class.
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    Although both genders have problems I don't know how anyone can argue that women aren't worse off. So glad I'm not a woman.
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    When you put it like that it sounds like you don't think women deserve the vote because it was the men who died in the war.
    It's a reasonable response to feminist rhetoric that frames woman's suffrage as "how hard women had to fight to get the vote". Which is the line that key stage 5-and-under history (ie everybody 16 and under) presents in my experience, and in my opinion, irresponsibly.

    I think it is undeniable that to get the privileges/rights men have today that women share, they have had to make more sacrifices and suffer more hardship.
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    (Original post by Jordooooom)
    You can't be serious.. For women to look good (body wise) all they have to do is eat healthily and exercise every so often.

    For a guy to look like men you see in media, they have to stick to a strict diet and training programme for years to get one of those bodies.

    And let's no even get into penis pumps and all that nonsense.

    As for role models. You're just going off tv and magazines. What male role models are there right now from tv and magazines?
    Come off it. Particularly in science, the vast majority of scientists in the public eye (people like Brian Cox or Neil deGrasse Tyson, off the top of my head) are men. I would say it's a little more equal in sport but then I'm an athletics fan, when it comes to football and rugby, where are the female role models? Football is everywhere (frustratingly so), and it's hugely male-dominated. The number of female directors of films is considerably lower than men. Don't get me started on the lack of decent female roles in films. And in music videos where men are singing, and particularly with rap women are frequently just used as props, in a way you don't see as often if it's a woman singing. We're starting to see an increase in good female role models but I would definitely say they're far outnumbered by men, less so in fiction than in life but then in both cases you've got a major issue with the lack of representation, or the misrepresentation of people who are disabled, people who aren't white, and people of different sexualities.
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    (Original post by KingStannis)
    It's a reasonable response to feminist rhetoric that frames woman's suffrage as "how hard women had to fight to get the vote". Which is the line that key stage 3, 4 and 5 history (ie everybody 16 and under) presents in my experience, and in my opinion, irresponsibly.

    I think it is undeniable that to get the privileges/rights men have today that women share, they have had to make more sacrifices and suffer more hardship.
    All I said in the original post was that women can vote now, which I think is a big step from 1914 when we couldn't, at least not equally with men, and I think it's good in terms of gender equality.

    I'll repeat my earlier point. Those priveleges were denied to men on the ground of class, or race, or sexuality, or ability, or education, or a myriad of other reasons but not because of gender.

    I'm getting to the point of sleepiness where I feel physically ill so I'm going to leave it at that for now and explain myself better in the morning.
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    (Original post by aspirinpharmacist)
    All I said in the original post was that women can vote now, which I think is a big step from 1914 when we couldn't, at least not equally with men, and I think it's good in terms of gender equality.

    I'll repeat my earlier point. Those priveleges were denied to men on the ground of class, or race, or sexuality, or ability, or education, or a myriad of other reasons but not because of gender.

    I'm getting to the point of sleepiness where I feel physically ill so I'm going to leave it at that for now and explain myself better in the morning.
    You're shifting the goal posts to men were denied the vote, from how much more suffering they've had to go through to get it. The latter is more important in my view.
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d03vahXFhiM
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    why are some of you people assuming that men CAN go out and roam the night risk free

    what a dumb thing to say

    this board is so dense
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    (Original post by BullViagra)
    this board is so dense
    As always.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    This is story of a woman to became a man. It may change ones perspective just a little.

    I know it is a long read but it is well worth it.

    http://www.avoiceformen.com/misandry...n-to-red-pill/
    It seems everyone overlooked your post, quite a brilliant read.

    Sounds like most of your problems, ladies, can be avoided. If you know you're going to subjected to sexual abuse why do you return to the club? I'm not saying its right but if you know it's going to happen, why return?

    You dont have to get pregnant, if you do, woMAN up and deal with it, its your responsibility.

    You don't have to look 'good', learn to be happy with yourself. Besides, most guys feel exactly the same but don't stress over it as much.

    Finally, sounds like OP likes to exaggerate a lot
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    (Original post by karmacrunch)
    "Just have to put up" :rolleyes:

    Congratulations for taking that out of context.
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    (Original post by OliverJR)
    Congratulations for taking that out of context.
    I quoted it incorrectly.

    You said 'girls just have to out up with'... I was rolling my eyes because I was thinking, "how would you know?" :rolleyes:

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