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    (Original post by harryleavey)
    I think everyone is struggling with this. My class kind of dismissed it until now.
    :mad::confused:
    I still don't get it none of the experiments make sense XD
    cries
    cries
    cries some more
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    (Original post by harryleavey)
    I think everyone is struggling with this. My class kind of dismissed it until now.
    :mad::confused:
    Do you think it's really that big of a deal if I just don't really learn this part? I know basics like neutralisation reaction and the difference between a base and an alkali but other than that........
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    (Original post by ssssara)
    Do you think it's really that big of a deal if I just don't really learn this part? I know basics like neutralisation reaction and the difference between a base and an alkali but other than that........
    I was speaking to my chemistry teacher and he kind of made it clearer. But I don't think I could even try to explain it. I might tell you the complete wrong thing :eek:. But it is going to be a max of 6 marks lost. So I would forget it and focus on something else.

    Good luck - I will be hoping it doesn't come up too
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    Yeah, I really need to know the basics of the acids, bases and salts, because it's the only part im genuinely clueless on.
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    (Original post by harryleavey)
    I was speaking to my chemistry teacher and he kind of made it clearer. But I don't think I could even try to explain it. I might tell you the complete wrong thing :eek:. But it is going to be a max of 6 marks lost. So I would forget it and focus on something else.

    Good luck - I will be hoping it doesn't come up too
    Hahaha sounds like good advice. Good luck tomorrow in the exam also, I'll be thinking of you, hoping that nothing on this topic comes up except for the neutralisation reaction. :') Let me know how it goes for you
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    https://youtu.be/9zdKq2-6Qm8?t=15m9s
    This might help. Start at roughly 15 minutes to miss the basics
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    (Original post by Kinnon)
    What's the "Ar"
    If you look at Oxygen for example on the periodic table, the Ar is 16 it is simply the mass number
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    And maybe this for some comic relief: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IAJsZWhj6GI
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    (Original post by ssssara)
    please can someone simplify exactly what I have to learn for Acids, Bases & Salts because I'm really really struggling
    Acid: A substance with a PH less than 7. Forms H+ ions in water.
    Base: A substance with a PH over 7.
    Soluble bases are alkalis which form OH- ions in water.

    Acid + Base = Salt + Water
    In ionic form: H+(aq) + OH-(aq) = H20(l)
    This is the basic neutralisation reaction. The products of a neutralisation reaction are always neutral, hence the name.

    Other useful neutralisation reactions:

    Acid + Metal = Salt + Hydrogen (unless metal is less reactive than H2)

    Acid + Metal Oxide = Salt + Water
    Acid + Metal Hydroxide = Salt + Water
    Acid + Metal Carbonate = Salt + Water + Carbon Dioxide

    Most metal oxides and hydroxides are bases (insoluble).
    The only exception to these equations is the neutralisation of ammonia by nitric acid to produce ONLY ammonium nitrate (no water).

    Someone posted the methods for making different salts earlier, and explained it better than I can, so maybe have a look at that too! Hope this helps
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    i think that actually doing the titration with the equipment and everything has been taken off the spec? my chemistry teacher said so, but i don't know...
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    What time should I sleep seeing how the exam is in the morning?
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    (Original post by harryleavey)
    What page is it on?
    Sorry I don't know I'm out right now but the page is titled 'Making Salts' and it is on the right
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    can someone please explain to me all i need to know about salts and insoluble salts??
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    Is there a chance that the Haber process could be the 6 mark question for C3?
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    (Original post by Sanderm1)
    What time should I sleep seeing how the exam is in the morning?
    8 or 9 hours will be fine. The worst thing to do is spend the whole evening worrying/ revising/ both.
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    (Original post by morganlethbridge)
    can someone please explain to me all i need to know about salts and insoluble salts??

    Insoluble salts are made by precipitating ions out of two solution mixtures.

    Solube salts can be made in two ways
    1. An acid and excess base
    2. Neutralisation using acid and an alkali (titration)
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    Kill meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 13 & 1/2 hours
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    do you guys know what can come up on the c2 paper?
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    (Original post by GenuineHpLaptop)
    Insoluble salts are made by precipitating ions out of two solution mixtures.

    Solube salts can be made in two ways
    1. An acid and excess base
    2. Neutralisation using acid and an alkali (titration)
    ah right what is precipitating
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    (Original post by pollyy)
    Acid: A substance with a PH less than 7. Forms H+ ions in water.
    Base: A substance with a PH over 7.
    Soluble bases are alkalis which form OH- ions in water.

    Acid + Base = Salt + Water
    In ionic form: H+(aq) + OH-(aq) = H20(l)
    This is the basic neutralisation reaction. The products of a neutralisation reaction are always neutral, hence the name.

    Other useful neutralisation reactions:

    Acid + Metal = Salt + Hydrogen (unless metal is less reactive than H2)

    Acid + Metal Oxide = Salt + Water
    Acid + Metal Hydroxide = Salt + Water
    Acid + Metal Carbonate = Salt + Water + Carbon Dioxide

    Most metal oxides and hydroxides are bases (insoluble).
    The only exception to these equations is the neutralisation of ammonia by nitric acid to produce ONLY ammonium nitrate (no water).

    Someone posted the methods for making different salts earlier, and explained it better than I can, so maybe have a look at that too! Hope this helps
    thank you so so so so much! I really appreciate it thank you. Good luck tomorrow x
 
 
 
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