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    (Original post by AJC1997)
    what you must do in the 20 mark question to get a level 4 mark:
    1. Use the provenance of the sources to explain similarities and differences.
    2. You must cross reference, taking a sequential approach doesn't work i.e. source 1 says.....next paragraph: source 2 says......is not effective.
    3. read each source critically and select the most relevant information to the question asked.

    here's how I would setup a 20 mark answer: in this case the question is:

    'How far do sources 2 and 3 challenge the view presented in source 1 about the contagious diseases acts?'

    1. small introductory paragraph: here you should set out the positions of the sources and your overall argument, here's a model introduction paragraph:

    'Source 1 argues that the contagious diseases acts were designed to harm women, to offend their feelings, ignore their rights. In addition, the source argues that the Acts were ineffective in preventing the spread of disease. In general, source 3 supports this argument, whereas source 2 contradicts it.'

    2. in the second paragraph you could have a paragraph explaining that source 3 for example agrees with source 1. You can also integrate source 2 and say the small ways in which it might also agree with source 1 to some extent. Use quotations from the sources to support the points you make. Discuss the similarities between all three sources and analyse the reliability of the sources using provenance where possible.

    3. In the third paragraph you can do the opposite and say how source 2 disagrees with source 1 , also compare it's differences to source 3. Always remain focused and relate back to the question being asked, reference the purpose and nature of the sources.

    4. a conclusion paragraph: for example:

    'In conclusion, source 3 agrees with the view presented in source 1 that the contagious diseases acts were harmful to women. Source 2, however, disagrees with source 1, as it claims the acts do not reflect any intention to harm women. Additionally, source 2 contradicts source 1 as it suggests that the acts are effective, whereas source 1 argues that they are not.

    Now the 40 mark question B:

    tips:
    -24 marks are awarded for own knowledge while 16 for integration and use of the sources.
    -to get full marks your own knowledge must be of great range and depth.
    -you must use the sources to support your own knowledge - integration of the sources and own knowledge

    example of integrating knowledge with a source:

    source 6 argues that it will lead to the end of a husband's right to stop his wife spending money badly. Indeed, the Married women's property act did give women three important legal rights. They could inherit property, and money up to a value of £200, they could inherit rented property, and they could legally keep anything they earned during their marriage.

    heres how I'd set it up:

    1. if theres a key definition in the question, start with a small paragraph defining the key term in a detailed way.

    2. in the second paragraph, you could introduce your overall answer to the question and use all three sources to draw links to the question.

    3. this paragraph should contain detailed own knowledge and integration of the sources to support and link to this knowledge, you should argue one point of view.

    4. in this paragraph, you should offer a counter argument to your previous paragraph, again integrating sources, presumably different sources would be used here to support your counter argument. This creates a balanced answer. You should integrate the sources and own knowledge together throughout the paragraph, instead of splitting it up into sources then own knowledge.

    5. a conclusive paragraph, making an overall judgement and referring back to the question asked at the beginning and your introduction. It is important to use sources in your conclusion, for example 'In conclusion, source 6 is wrong to suggest......'

    Hopefully this might be helpful to someone in some way!
    A good guide here

    I am not sure what the third paragraph is meant to do, because I know you have one agree and one disagree - what would the counter argument do exactly? Can you write an example paragraph just to illustrate what you mean?
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    (Original post by The Marshall)
    A good guide here

    I am not sure what the third paragraph is meant to do, because I know you have one agree and one disagree - what would the counter argument do exactly? Can you write an example paragraph just to illustrate what you mean?
    Is this true for any source paper as I am prob doing another topic to him. like is this the perfect structure for al source based questions for edexcel???
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    (Original post by DoubleOG)
    Anyone doing Britain and Ireland?
    Yes, what are your predictions this year?
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    (Original post by Boatman15)
    Anyone do old poor law and public health here


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    yeah, I am
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    (Original post by _Aqsxo)
    What does provenance mean?

    Also, could someone explain the coniliation bills to me (Suffrage question) and what veto powers of the house of lords means??
    Provenance is who wrote the source and why
    so say you got a source about the negative impact of militancy and Emmeline Pankhurst wrote it, straight away you could say "source (whatever) is unlikely to criticise the impact of militancy and see it in a negative light as it was written by the leader of the WSPU a group that campaigned for the vote with the use of militancy. Therefore, she is likely to protect the movement and see militancy as a positive move as she promotes the use of militancy" something like that anyway!

    The conciliation bills were rejected 3 times but their aim was to extend the vote to wealthy property owning women, but they were rejected and thrown out.

    The veto powers of the house of lords, removed their power, this was influential for women's suffrage as they could no longer reject proposals put forward regarding the cause women's suffrage

    Hope that helped a little
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    (Original post by edward090)
    Is this true for any source paper as I am prob doing another topic to him. like is this the perfect structure for al source based questions for edexcel???
    In my opinion, any source based structure is more than useful for answering any source based question for Edexcel. Check through the pages here and you will find plenty of good stuff on how to answer the source based questions. See which one fits you though - plenty of methods like in maths, but pick the one you can understand and use it.

    But for source questions - there will always be a agree paragraph and disagree paragraph.

    Your job is to read the sources - then use them to support your argument.

    I must note - please do not go into narrative. It can happen but remember this - you are analysing the source material that is given to you.

    I'm doing the 1945-2000s topic - so a very broad topic.
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    Could anyone define what a PRIMARY source and SECONDARY SOURCE is? Just so that none of us get confused about it.
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    (Original post by The Marshall)
    Could anyone define what a PRIMARY source and SECONDARY SOURCE is? Just so that none of us get confused about it.
    A primary source is a first hand account/experience e.g a soldier's diary from ww1 written in 1914.
    A secondary source is one that relies on the information of the primary source e.g textbook describing ww1, written in 1986.
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    (Original post by bob smith 23)
    A primary source is a first hand account/experience e.g a soldier's diary from ww1 written in 1914.
    A secondary source is one that relies on the information of the primary source e.g textbook describing ww1, written in 1986.
    Thank you.

    And I suppose, statements within media, interviews are very likely to be primary.

    Secondary source - books/articles - do Blogs come into this? Websites.

    Thanks
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    If anyone is doing 1945-2000, please PM me and tell me what predictions you think may come in the exam.
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    (Original post by neruallauren)
    I am! How are you feeling about it?
    Kind of nervous as if none of the stuff is going in, got all of the stuff from the edexcel book but have know idea what they're going to ask us
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    (Original post by _Aqsxo)
    What does provenance mean?

    Also, could someone explain the coniliation bills to me (Suffrage question) and what veto powers of the house of lords means??
    For provenance my teacher taught me a simple way of answering it

    Nature- is the source a letter, report etc
    Origin- where does it come from e.g date or place
    Purpose- what is the purpose of this report, letter etc
    Audience-who is this addressed to
    Language- what is the language used and why is it used

    Unfortunately I'm doing your question but hope this helps
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    Can someone tell me if provenance and reliability are the same thing? If not, what is the difference?
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    (Original post by Michael_student)
    Can someone tell me if provenance and reliability are the same thing? If not, what is the difference?
    I don't know if you've been taught the same thing, but our teacher said never to refer to a source as 'reliable' (how trustworthy it is).
    Instead you talk about its 'interpretational weight' (something the examiners love).
    This is where provenance comes in, which is NOPA.
    Nature
    Origin
    Purpose
    Audience
    E.g.
    The nature of the source is a poster by the government, this means it's possible that it has the purpose of convincing the public that A is a necessary, meaning that it could have exaggerated A to get this point across, weakening its reliability. X
    INSTEAD

    The nature of the source is a poster by the government, this means that it is possible that it has the purpose of convincing the public that A is a necessary, meaning that it could have exaggerated A to get this point across, weakening the source's interpretational weight considerably.

    The difference is reliability is how far a source can be trusted, provenance is the NOPA itself, more focus on its credibility/interpretational weight
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    (Original post by bob smith 23)
    I don't know if you've been taught the same thing, but our teacher said never to refer to a source as 'reliable' (how trustworthy it is).
    Instead you talk about its 'interpretational weight' (something the examiners love).
    This is where provenance comes in, which is NOPA.
    Nature
    Origin
    Purpose
    Audience
    E.g.
    The nature of the source is a poster by the government, this means it's possible that it has the purpose of convincing the public that A is a necessary, meaning that it could have exaggerated A to get this point across, weakening its reliability. X
    INSTEAD

    The nature of the source is a poster by the government, this means that it is possible that it has the purpose of convincing the public that A is a necessary, meaning that it could have exaggerated A to get this point across, weakening the source's interpretational weight considerably.

    The difference is reliability is how far a source can be trusted, provenance is the NOPA itself, more focus on its credibility/interpretational weight
    What unit are u doing for history? and do u mind putting it in a practice para and underlying the bits of NOPA as it is very intriguing as I have never been taught that technique before. Is Nature like whether its a poster,diary entry,statement etc?
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    (Original post by edward090)
    What unit are u doing for history? and do u mind putting it in a practice para and underlying the bits of NOPA as it is very intriguing as I have never been taught that technique before.
    I'm doing Unit 2 Option D- Britain and Ireland:

    The extract is from an A grade essayBefore I do so, to put it into context, the Black and Tans were hired by the government to fight the IRA forces in Ireland, however, their brutality proved very unpopular amongst English and Irish).

    In order to judge the provenance of the source, the interpretational weight must first be considered. The fact that the nature of the source is an article written by an English Journalist means he could have exaggerated the brutality of the Black and Tans to reflect popular public opinion in England (audience), which , in 1920 (origin), the time the source was written, was very much against these violent actions, to appear more interesting and therefore sell more copies (purpose), weakening the interpretational weight of the source considerably.

    This would be for a 20 mark question, sorry if this isn't what you're looking for.
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    (Original post by jabire3)
    ^^^^ You don't get marks for evaluating the provenance in the 40 mark questions (the nature, origin and purpose). Cross reference and you may want to mention the audience but do not waste your time evaluating the provenance!
    When should u evaluate the provenance? in a part a question??
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    I'll throw in the phrase 'interpretational weight' instead of reliability, it sounds much more Historianesque.
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    (Original post by Gunnarsunn)
    Hey,

    In a 40 marker there is always a primary or principle source. In order to get top marks for the sources criteria (Out of 16) YOU MUST weight up the usefulness of the primary source's provenance and how it is directly
    Correlated to the question.

    Regards.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What do u mean by weigh up the "usefulness" of the sources? and what else do u need to write about the sources to get full marks for the source bit?
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    (Original post by bob smith 23)
    I'm doing Unit 2 Option D- Britain and Ireland:

    The extract is from an A grade essayBefore I do so, to put it into context, the Black and Tans were hired by the government to fight the IRA forces in Ireland, however, their brutality proved very unpopular amongst English and Irish).

    In order to judge the provenance of the source, the interpretational weight must first be considered. The fact that the nature of the source is an article written by an English Journalist means he could have exaggerated the brutality of the Black and Tans to reflect popular public opinion in England (audience), which , in 1920 (origin), the time the source was written, was very much against these violent actions, to appear more interesting and therefore sell more copies (purpose), weakening the interpretational weight of the source considerably.

    This would be for a 20 mark question, sorry if this isn't what you're looking for.
    Do you have anything like this for a 40 mark question?

    Are you sure the ' weakening the intreprational weight of source' is loved by examiners?
 
 
 

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