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    (Original post by richpanda)
    but extra time isn't the 'life' part of it... my main problem isn't with the disabled people who have it, it's with the very large proportion of people who have no reason to have it, yet are still given extra time.
    How do you know they have no reason to have it?
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    How do you know they have no reason to have it?
    Last month one of my mates in an a level maths class said when he does practice papers he usually runs out of time as a general comment. The teacher said do you usually run out of time, and he said yes. The teacher then said he would get him extra time.

    He's clever, doesn't write slowly and has no sort of condition. I think he declined the offer, but why should he and others be given extra time?
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    Last month one of my mates in an a level maths class said when he does practice papers he usually runs out of time as a general comment. The teacher said do you usually run out of time, and he said yes. The teacher then said he would get him extra time.

    He's clever, doesn't write slowly and has no sort of condition. I think he declined the offer, but why should he and others be given extra time?
    Doesn't mean he will get extra time
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Doesn't mean he will get extra time
    I have several other anecdotes that I can't be bothered to fully write out, but the general message is that there is either no checks by a qualified expert, or these 'experts' are very lenient.
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    Personally, I do feel it's kinda unfair. Once you leave school/ uni employers need to be able to judge you academic skills based on your grades - how can they trust them if you got 25% more time to do the exam??? Plus, they can't ask whether you have a disability of not due to discrimination laws so they have no way if knowing.

    A fairer way would be to allow job applicants to state whether they have a disability that could have affected their grades and let the employed judge whether they can do the job.

    I have friends who get extra time for silly things like writing to slowly or being 'slow processors'. While I recognise that some people have a genuine disability, being a bit stupid isn't one of them.

    Sorry if this is rather a controversial opinion, but it's frustrating seeing all those people diagnosed is ohony disabilities or who faked the tests getting an unfair advantage in their exams. Not telling employers that they have this 'disability' is then tantamount to lying about abilities they do not actually have.
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Personally, I do feel it's kinda unfair. Once you leave school/ uni employers need to be able to judge you academic skills based on your grades - how can they trust them if you got 25% more time to do the exam??? Plus, they can't ask whether you have a disability of not due to discrimination laws so they have no way if knowing.

    A fairer way would be to allow job applicants to state whether they have a disability that could have affected their grades and let the employed judge whether they can do the job.

    I have friends who get extra time for silly things like writing to slowly or being 'slow processors'. While I recognise that some people have a genuine disability, being a bit stupid isn't one of them.

    Sorry if this is rather a controversial opinion, but it's frustrating seeing all those people diagnosed is ohony disabilities or who faked the tests getting an unfair advantage in their exams. Not telling employers that they have this 'disability' is then tantamount to lying about abilities they do not actually have.
    Not sure is want that on my CV.

    But there is something a bit dishonest about it. I think we'd all do a lot better with 25% extra time to process questions and write out the answer.

    You may then look great on your CV, but the extra time may well mean that there are people out there who are better at your job/applicants who would do a better job. And you won't be cut any slack by them. Your deadlines won't get extended, your mistakes won't be overlooked, your inability to type will be picked up on, you'll get marks against your name for following out instructions incorrectly.

    Maybe it shouldn't be extra time, laptops and voice recorders that are lavished on students, but a new type of study skills that enable them to work around the problem and become as resilient as they will need to be for the real world.
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    I used to get extra time, not sure about now but I think it's important that those with disabilities do get a fairer chance. In employment, an employer has to make reasonable adjustments to suit an employee needs so why is it not fair?
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    (Original post by dragonkeeper999)
    Personally, I do feel it's kinda unfair. Once you leave school/ uni employers need to be able to judge you academic skills based on your grades - how can they trust them if you got 25% more time to do the exam??? Plus, they can't ask whether you have a disability of not due to discrimination laws so they have no way if knowing.
    If the nature of your disability will directly impact upon you in the workforce then yes, they have a right to know and they will ask, particularly if it's a fast paced environment.
    A fairer way would be to allow job applicants to state whether they have a disability that could have affected their grades and let the employed judge whether they can do the job.
    No, this is not fairer. Why should some people be put at a disadvantage because they have a condition? The whole point of extra time is to make the system fairer and tailored to individual needs = equality. So in theory, by basing your decision on whether someone has extra time will discredit the whole point of extra time.
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I used to get extra time, not sure about now but I think it's important that those with disabilities do get a fairer chance. In employment, an employer has to make reasonable adjustments to suit an employee needs so why is it not fair?
    But an employer won't. Yes they'll do things like make sure there's disabled access or adjust your computer screen if the words need to be larger, but they won't give you extra time or overlook you misunderstanding things or being inarticulate if you are client facing, or being unable to remember processes.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    But an employer won't. Yes they'll do things like make sure there's disabled access or adjust your computer screen if the words need to be larger, but they won't give you extra time or overlook you misunderstanding things or being inarticulate if you are client facing, or being unable to remember processes.
    I think a lot of the reasonable aids that can help an employee will be equipment, depending on what the employee will require. It honestly depends on what job they do, I doubt they will be in a high paced job but they might go for a job that is more suited to them. Some people, when they get older tend to get better at what they struggled on in terms of disability but it honestly comes down to individuality. Fair enough they might not get extra time in a job, in fact I've never heard that is even possible but the tasks they are given won't be so heavy and stressful.
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I think a lot of the reasonable aids that can help an employee will be equipment, depending on what the employee will require. It honestly depends on what job they do, I doubt they will be in a high paced job but they might go for a job that is more suited to them. Some people, when they get older tend to get better at what they struggled on in terms of disability but it honestly comes down to individuality. Fair enough they might not get extra time in a job, in fact I've never heard that is even possible but the tasks they are given won't be so heavy and stressful.
    Yeah, the only problem would be though if they are unable to hold down that job because they applied for it thinking they were suitable based on exam results that were gained from so much extra help. It's really tough.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    Yeah, the only problem would be though if they are unable to hold down that job because they applied for it thinking they were suitable based on exam results that were gained from so much extra help. It's really tough.
    I imagine it's tougher for those who go to university and have extra time too, as opposed to those who forego extra time at uni because their situation has improved. If you get used to it, you become too reliant and you cannot be without it. I'm just thinking what job roles would be fine for those with these kind of problems that they face. It relates to coursework too, I'm sure those with genuine problems will get extensions but then in the real world, everything has to be on time and finished pronto.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    But an employer won't. Yes they'll do things like make sure there's disabled access or adjust your computer screen if the words need to be larger, but they won't give you extra time or overlook you misunderstanding things or being inarticulate if you are client facing, or being unable to remember processes.
    If a symptom of your condition involves impaired or distorted memory, why would you apply for a job that is heavily involved in remembering processes?
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    If a symptom of your condition involves impaired or distorted memory, why would you apply for a job that is heavily involved in remembering processes?
    A huge number of jobs including many junior admin roles require remembering many processes and the workings and nuances of many different systems. And there not going to put in the job advert explicitly what you are going to be handling in terms of the above, you'll just be expected to cope with it.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    A huge number of jobs including many junior admin roles require remembering many processes and the workings and nuances of many different systems. And there not going to put in the job advert explicitly what you are going to be handling in terms of the above, you'll just be expected to cope with it.
    They should therefore make the employer aware that they have a condition that will directly impact upon their ability to remember. If the employer still offers them the job, they have accepted it and should therefore make reasonable allowances, otherwise, it would be seen as discrimination.

    The job description will always have a list of your expected duties though. I'm quite small and not that psychically strong, so I'd never apply for a job that requires heavy lifting because I would struggle and would not be able to cope.
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    (Original post by Rhythmical)
    I imagine it's tougher for those who go to university and have extra time too, as opposed to those who forego extra time at uni because their situation has improved. If you get used to it, you become too reliant and you cannot be without it. I'm just thinking what job roles would be fine for those with these kind of problems that they face. It relates to coursework too, I'm sure those with genuine problems will get extensions but then in the real world, everything has to be on time and finished pronto.
    This is why I think we should teach coping skills that can be transferred to the work place. My brother is on a waiting list to be tested for Aspergers but his school tried to help with being lenient to the point where he is now doing very badly. I can't help but think if they'd taught him how to get around some of the problems he has he would be doing so much better. As for me I've just found ways around my problems, yes it's stressful and not fair and there are some issues I have where I just have to throw my hands in the air and say; I'm really crap at this! But it's actually really benefitted me the way I've done it.
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    I think it depends. I think if it's medically proven by the doctors or someone that you genuinely need it for a medical reason that's not solvable by practise, then it's okay. But just "I write slow" or "I take longer to think" shouldn't really be an excuse.
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    (Original post by Tinka99)
    Curious about your thoughts.
    It is fair, if people have handicaps. In my exams, I got an extra hour because of my Asperger-syndrome. that was very fair, because I need a bit more time to understand the tasks and to write my answers to them.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    They should therefore make the employer aware that they have a condition that will directly impact upon their ability to remember. If the employer still offers them the job, they have accepted it and should therefore make reasonable allowances, otherwise, it would be seen as discrimination.

    The job description will always have a list of your expected duties though. I'm quite small and not that psychically strong, so I'd never apply for a job that requires heavy lifting because I would struggle and would not be able to cope.
    But next to no one is going to hire someone who tells them that at interview.

    And a job spec will tend to say things like "input orders into such and such database/system" which sounds easy enough but unless you've used it before you're going to have to learn a whole new system, probably several.
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    (Original post by HazMusicPanda)
    I think it depends. I think if it's medically proven by the doctors or someone that you genuinely need it for a medical reason that's not solvable by practise, then it's okay. But just "I write slow" or "I take longer to think" shouldn't really be an excuse.
    See it a bit different. If this has something to do with a handicap like autism, it is not an excuse in my opinion. And as far as I know autism like Asperger is a medically proven 'disease'...
 
 
 
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