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The Life of Leviathan – Depression, Bullying, Fatigue and Other Obstacles Watch

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    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Leviathan1741 Wow! Great writing skills - you documented that really well (I know it's getting a bit boring as I say it every time but it's true! ) The journey there did sound awful with the asthma and blister. The view looks amazing though so you really were rewarded for your hard work :yep: A real cliff hanger here...can't wait to find out what happened the next day :awesome:
    Thank you Matrix! I don't mind you repeating yourself, it makes me happy to know that my writing is appreciated!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Thank you Matrix! I don't mind you repeating yourself, it makes me happy to know that my writing is appreciated!
    Welcome Haha, in that case, you may have to prepare for hearing it after every single post

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    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Welcome Haha, in that case, you may have to prepare for hearing it after every single post

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    Haha, that's alright!
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    Oh gosh, Leviathan1741 this is so wonderfully written that the words resonate so profoundly. :eek2:
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    (Original post by SinsNotTragedies)
    Oh gosh, Leviathan1741 this is so wonderfully written that the words resonate so profoundly. :eek2:
    Haha thank you! I'm guessing you're enjoying reading it then? I hope you are!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Haha thank you! I'm guessing you're enjoying reading it then? I hope you are!
    I am indeed. I think you seem an amazing person, also - you are so determined.
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    (Original post by SinsNotTragedies)
    I am indeed. I think you seem an amazing person, also - you are so determined.
    I'm glad to hear that! Aww thanks! I'm quite resilient I think, I don't tend to give up easily
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    Hey guys! I hope you're all doing good!

    I've decided to change my upload schedule to Monday and Thursday. I'm posting this chapter a little early because I'll be busy tomorrow, I hope you guys don't mind! This is also the longest chapter, I promise!

    1st April – Day 2 – Tormore to Drumadoon

    When I woke up this morning, I could barely move. My whole body ached, and I had acquired a sore throat, probably from Rachel, who already had a cold. I dragged myself out of bed and pulled on some clothes, wondering what we’d be doing that day.

    Thankfully, this time we didn’t have to walk for miles to reach our destination, and travelled there by coach instead. It took a long time to get there, but the scenery was lovely. When we arrived, the coach dropped us off on a farm. We walked down a muddy track towards the beach, and when we reached it, Kate gave us a talk on how the area used to be a desert and that the beach was made of sandstone. As we walked along the beach, I chatted to John, and discovered that we both liked Papa Roach, which was really cool. Kate took us to a turtle-shaped rock formation made of pitchstone known as Turtle Rock. She also explained how sills and dykes are formed, and we carried on walking. The sandstone was really slippery though, and I twisted my ankle a couple of times.

    Eventually, we arrived at the base of a cliff, which gave me a bad feeling. John called out “Alright, we’re going to be walking up this cliff here” like that was the most natural thing in the world. He continued, “don’t bother grabbing hold of any plants because they’ll just come straight out of the ground. See you at the top!”, as if that was supposed to make things any better. The cliff seemed to stretch up forever, and clambering up the steep and very narrow dirt path with John’s warning about the plants in my head was rather unnerving. And, when I’d got about halfway up, my lungs were killing me. I could hardly breathe and felt weak, and this was certainly NOT the best time for that to happen.

    Finally though, I made it to the top of the cliff! But Kate and John were off again, so I didn’t really have time to get my breath back. Fortunately, after scrambling down an impossibly steep and muddy path, we ended up on another beach, where Kate and John told us we’d be having lunch. The sun had come out, and because we were all dressed in lots of layers, waterproofs and hats, we were all beginning to boil. Rachel and I sat down on a grassy patch and took out our sandwiches. I had asked for tuna and mayo, but for some reason I’d received a chicken and mayo one instead.

    After we’d all eaten and had a rest, Kate and John stood up and described what our next task was. They explained that we had to draw a geological map of the beach, including labels with measurements, angles and rock types and structures. Rachel, Josh and I formed a team and set off to the end of the beach away from everyone else, to begin making our map. The first thing we immediately established was that we had absolutely no idea where to start. All of the rocks looked the same, and we didn’t really know what we were supposed to be drawing. After a while, John came over and asked us how we were getting on. We hadn’t done much, so he tried to help us by pointing out where the dykes were and how to spot any faults. With John’s guidance, we were able to produce some sort of map, although what we’d drawn still didn’t make much sense.

    When we’d completed our maps, Kate and John took us on another walk. They took us up to the mouth of a cave, called King’s Cave, where we put on our hard hats and ventured inside. I’d hoped it was going to be a proper cave with stalactites and stalagmites, but there weren’t any, nor were there any long tunnels to explore or small spaces to squeeze into. Instead, the cave only extended backwards away from the entrance for 20m or so, and the only things to look at were some cave paintings. That might have been interesting for archaeologists or historians, I thought, but not to geologists.

    We spent about fifteen minutes looking at the cave paintings before heading back out. We trekked along the coastline for another half hour before we came to our next stop. As we made our way along the uneven, narrow dirt path, the shoreline got further away and soon we were surrounded by grass instead of pebbles and sand. Kate pointed out a particularly impressive sill running the length of the cliff, and eventually we stopped on a grassy area between the cliff and the beach. John split us into groups of about 10, and Kate took each group in turn off into the bushes close to the cliff.

    When it was my group’s turn to go, Kate took us to see a dinosaur footprint which was visible in the rock face. We had to climb over a small waterfall to get to it, and when we got there, I was a little disappointed with how small it was. After looking at it for five minutes or so, we clambered back down the waterfall and re-joined the others. By then the sun had gone in again and the wind was picking up. Rachel and I chatted to Josh, who told us that he’d sat on an ants nest at lunch. “I sat on an ants nest earlier. I don’t think they’ve all gone though because I can still feel some tickles on my legs and tummy”, he laughed, attempting to scratch himself through his many layers of clothing.

    We continued our journey along the coastline, with Kate and John pointing out different rocks and structures along the way. In the distance, I could see the path making a sharp turn up the cliff. “There’s no way I’m walking up that” I whispered to Rachel, recalling our previous cliff-climbing experience.

    Just as I’d feared, we DID have to walk up the cliff, and it was just as difficult as the last time. This time though, it wasn’t just me who struggled. Some of the other kids were obviously having a hard time too, which made me feel a little better. We stopped briefly halfway up to make sure no one was getting left behind, which I was grateful for. “Don’t have a heart attack, Pete” I heard Tom say, to Peter who was lying on the ground on his back, panting and groaning.

    After getting to the top of the cliff, we continued to walk across a couple of fields. The ground was incredibly boggy though, and we had to be careful not to step in the mud. At one particularly boggy spot, I misjudged where the more solid ground was, and my right walking boot got sucked into the mud. That was a little bit embarrassing and I could hear the others giggling, but at least I hadn’t fallen right over!

    We trudged through the fields for another 15 minutes or so, and stopped opposite Drumadoon sill. It was an impressive sight, with huge columns of basalt stretching off into the distance. Kate asked us to get out our field notebooks and draw a sketch of it. Kate and John checked each of our sketches to make sure we’d labelled everything correctly, and pointed out any extras we could add to help us prepare for our coursework.

    When we’d all had our sketches checked, we carried on walking across the fields, through a golf course and down onto the road. My blisters were killing me, but by that point I was past caring. We wondered along the road for a while before Kate and John turned off to take a ‘short cut’ across another bog. We staggered off the road and back towards the beach. Gradually the grass turned to sand and rock pools began popping up. Rachel, Josh and I walked together, chatting about how awful the trip had been so far and how much we’d like to go home.

    As we walked further along the beach, the sand graded into pebbles. “The clasts have arrived” commented Josh, as we stumbled along far behind everyone else. Josh bent down and picked up a piece of beach glass, remarking “Oh look, I’ve found some pretty beach glass to remind me of the horror”. Rachel and I laughed as he went on to say “and to be honest by now I’ve probably trodden on a jellyfish”. Rachel suddenly let out a small squeak as she accidentally stepped into a stream of water running down the beach, and shook her leg to try and get most of the water off. Josh looked wistfully towards the sea, saying “I wish we could go into town and get some ice creams and relax. Then we could go back to the centre later and say we got lost, and take the bus most of the way there as well”.

    We finally reached the end of the beach and got back onto the road. We had to walk in single file as the road was narrow, and we found ourselves outside a little shop next to a playground. Kate and John told us we were going to wait there for a bus to arrive to take us back to the centre, which was met by a cheer from everyone.

    After waiting for about half an hour, Kate got a phone call from the centre. It turned out that the bus was going to be late, so she told us we could go into the shop and buy some souvenirs or ice cream if we wanted to. The wind was getting increasing chilly, so I stayed outside while Rachel and Josh went to get ice creams. They returned a short while later; Rachel had bought a vanilla ice cream, while Josh had bought two tubs, a small one and a large one. When Josh opened the lid of the smaller tub, he took out the little wooden spoon provided to eat with. It didn’t really look like a spoon though; it was just a flat, rectangular piece of wood with no actual scoop. “This isn’t a spoon, it’s a thing”, he said, looking puzzled. He polished off the small tub in no time at all, and opened the lid of the bigger tub. “The bigger tub doesn’t have one so I’ll have to use this”, waving the ‘spoon’ in annoyance. Josh was about halfway through the larger tub when Kate and John noticed what he was doing.
    “How on earth are you able to eat so much ice cream? Don’t you feel sick, Josh?” John asked, quizzically.
    Josh replied, “I’m eating it all now because I realised I don’t have a freezer, so I can’t really do anything else with it”.
    “Fair enough then!” John called back. Disappointingly, Josh didn’t finish the larger tub of ice cream. He was so cold that he was shaking, and decided that he’d better not eat any more just in case.

    About 20 minutes later, the bus finally turned up. There was a mad rush to get onto it, and Rachel and I ended up getting separated from Josh. My legs were so sore that the pain was almost unbearable, even sitting down didn’t ease it. The journey back took about half an hour, and when the time came to get off, I could hardly find the strength to stand up.

    Dinner consisted of spicy carrot soup for a starter, which annoyingly I somehow managed to dip my sleeve into, followed by burger and chips. The burgers were really flat and rubbery, and I didn’t manage to finish mine, but I didn’t feel too bad since it looked like a lot of other people didn’t finish theirs either.

    During evening class, Kate and John talked about metamorphism and asked us all to colour in a geological map of Britain. When evening class was over, we staggered through the howling wind and rain back to the main building, and went to bed with little hesitation.

    The photos:
    The sea, in the one time the sun came out during the whole week
    A pair of seabirds
    More sea (I wasn't sure how else to describe it)
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    When we’d completed our maps, Kate and John took us on another walk. They took us up to the mouth of a cave, called King’s Cave, where we put on our hard hats and ventured inside. I’d hoped it was going to be a proper cave with stalactites and stalagmites, but there weren’t any, nor were there any long tunnels to explore or small spaces to squeeze into. Instead, the cave only extended backwards away from the entrance for 20m or so, and the only things to look at were some cave paintings. That might have been interesting for archaeologists or historians, I thought, but not to geologists.

    We spent about fifteen minutes looking at the cave paintings before heading back out. We trekked along the coastline for another half hour before we came to our next stop. As we made our way along the uneven, narrow dirt path, the shoreline got further away and soon we were surrounded by grass instead of pebbles and sand. Kate pointed out a particularly impressive sill running the length of the cliff, and eventually we stopped on a grassy area between the cliff and the beach. John split us into groups of about 10, and Kate took each group in turn off into the bushes close to the cliff.

    When it was my group’s turn to go, Kate took us to see a dinosaur footprint which was visible in the rock face. We had to climb over a small waterfall to get to it, and when we got there, I was a little disappointed with how small it was. After looking at it for five minutes or so, we clambered back down the waterfall and re-joined the others. By then the sun had gone in again and the wind was picking up. Rachel and I chatted to Josh, who told us that he’d sat on an ants nest at lunch. “I sat on an ants nest earlier. I don’t think they’ve all gone though because I can still feel some tickles on my legs and tummy”, he laughed, attempting to scratch himself through his many layers of clothing.
    Aww I remember this! The cave was indeed disappointing but the therapod footprint was great but you'd have no idea it's there if nobody specifically pointed it out to you because it's just in the middle of bushes and trees! Josh should be glad that he hadn't sat on a tick swarm unlike somebody in my year...

    Sounds like you did practically the same thing as we did on one of our days, did you follow the porphyritic dolerite dykes that filled up the Drumadoon?
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Aww I remember this! The cave was indeed disappointing but the therapod footprint was great but you'd have no idea it's there if nobody specifically pointed it out to you because it's just in the middle of bushes and trees! Josh should be glad that he hadn't sat on a tick swarm unlike somebody in my year...

    Sounds like you did practically the same thing as we did on one of our days, did you follow the porphyritic dolerite dykes that filled up the Drumadoon?
    Ah really?! Yeah, the cave was disappointing! Haha, it makes you wonder why on earth anyone went up there where the footprint was in the first place! Oh gosh, ticks are awful aren't they?

    I can't remember honestly! I remember we were following a large sill in one of the cliffs though!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Oh gosh, ticks are awful aren't they?
    Yeah. I fortunately didn't get one but I got so paranoid. One person in my year literally got hundreds on his arm. Aghhhhhhhhh.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Yeah. I fortunately didn't get one but I got so paranoid. One person in my year literally got hundreds on his arm. Aghhhhhhhhh.
    I don't blame you, I would've been paranoid too! I was paranoid about bedbugs instead!
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    Just posting one more Arran photo, as you guys seem to like them!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
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    Hi, this sounds like a lot of fun!:yep:Climbing up those cliffs sure does sound very terrifying but I'm sure you have a great sense of accomplishment afterwards. This was very well written as usual and very interesting to read. I really like the pictures too!
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    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Hi, this sounds like a lot of fun!:yep:Climbing up those cliffs sure does sound very terrifying but I'm sure you have a great sense of accomplishment afterwards. This was very well written as usual and very interesting to read. I really like the pictures too!
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    Haha, it was quite the opposite! Climbing up the cliffs was certainly nerve wracking!

    Thank you! I'm glad you like them!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Haha, it was quite the opposite! Climbing up the cliffs was certainly nerve wracking!

    Thank you! I'm glad you like them!
    Ohh I see! No worries, thanks for sharing

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    OMG. These pictures are pleasure to my eyes 😱😭😭😭😍😍😍😍 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍 😍😍 Nice read as usual thanks for sharing :lovehug:
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    (Original post by FrenchUnicorn)
    OMG. These pictures are pleasure to my eyes 😱😭😭😭😍😍😍😍 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍😍 😍😍 Nice read as usual thanks for sharing :lovehug:
    I'm really happy you like them! There are 3 short chapters left to upload here, then I'll be posting about France!
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    Hey guys! It's only a short chapter tonight! I hope you enjoy it

    2nd April – Day 3 – (Not) The 9 Mile Walk

    This morning when I woke up, I felt truly awful. I had one of the worst sore throats I’ve ever had, and my whole body was so achy that I honestly didn’t think I’d be able to get out of bed. At breakfast, I developed overwhelming nausea and knew I wouldn’t be able to cope with another day of walking, especially as I knew that today we were meant to go on a 9 mile hike.

    I bumped into Kate on the way back to our room, and told her that I didn’t feel well. Thankfully, she wasn’t mad at me at all and told me that I could stay at the centre for the day if I wanted to.

    It turned out that I wasn’t the only one sitting out that day. Peter from my field group and another girl were also staying behind at the centre due to illness. We sat in the staff lounge for most of the morning, answering questions out of the geology textbook. It was incredibly tedious, but I was extremely grateful that I wasn’t outside. The weather was terrible, and as usual, it was freezing.

    After completing a few pages of questions, we were allowed to go back to our rooms. I decided to eat my lunch and listen to some music, which I hadn’t done for the last few days and I was really starting to miss. My sandwich turned out to be chicken mayo again, even though I’d asked for tuna mayo instead. While I was doing my best to eat my sandwich without throwing up, a guy wandered into the room with a bin bag, who’d come to empty our bin. “Oops, sorry!” he said, seeing me and swiftly shuffling out again. I sat there for a while longer, and then I had an idea. I got my pack of hand warmers out of my suitcase and opened one. The instructions said to shake the hand warmer until it was warm, so I shook it a bit. Nothing was happening though, so I shook it a little harder. It still wasn’t getting warm, so I looked at the instructions again. It didn’t specify how long to shake it for, so I continued, thinking it would start to warm up soon. After half an hour of shaking though, I’d only managed to get it lukewarm, so I decided to give up. It’s a good thing I wasn’t trying to use one while climbing up a mountain, I thought, because I probably would’ve died of hypothermia by then.

    My field group returned after another couple of hours. Rachel told me how tiring the walk was, and that crossing the boulder field was horrible. I knew I’d made the right decision to stay at the centre, since walking had become agonisingly painful (I almost had to walk on my heels due to the pain from my blisters), and the pain in my throat seemed to get worse each time I swallowed. “You know the food’s bad when you walk miles and still don’t want to eat it” said Tom at dinner, which happened to be pork with gravy and vegetables.
    “Yeah” replied Charlotte, pushing the not-quite-cooked carrots around her plate with her fork.

    During evening class, Kate and John made us do this thing called “speed dating”, where we had to identify a series of rocks as quickly as possible. I don’t remember which group won that, but it definitely wasn’t mine!
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
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    Where was that walk? It wasn't by any chance from near Holy Isle to Brodick was it?
 
 
 
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