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    If a 4 marker came up on 'outline synaptic transmission through neurons' what 4 marking points would you state?
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    (Original post by THESTRESS)
    Yeah i do not think we do...we just need to know the process
    Thank god ahahh
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    (Original post by Mephestic)
    Ahh cool - whos your psychology teacher? I use to have a teacher called Mrs Philpot (if i recall) - doubt she will be there anymore.
    I dont know her lol and mine is Mr Dajee
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    (Original post by Mina_)
    If a 4 marker came up on 'outline synaptic transmission through neurons' what 4 marking points would you state?
    1. An electrical impulse travels along an axon.
    2. This triggers the nerve-ending of a neuron to release chemical messengers called neurotransmitters.
    3. These chemicals diffuse across the synapse (the gap) and bind with receptor molecules on the membrane of the next neuron.
    4. The receptor molecules on the second neuron bind only to the specific chemicals released from the first neuron. This stimulates the second neuron to transmit the electrical impulse.
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    (Original post by Mina_)
    If a 4 marker came up on 'outline synaptic transmission through neurons' what 4 marking points would you state?
    What an awfully worded question. This is about synapses though, so I'd just describe what happens there.

    I'd probably state:
    A synapse is a junction between two neurons.
    At the presynaptic neuron an electrical impulse, called an action potential, stimulates the release of chemicals called neurotransmitters (e.g. serotonin) stored in vesicles to exit the presynaptic neuron via exocytosis into a gap - called the synaptic cleft.
    The neurotransmitter diffuse across the synaptic cleft and bind to specific receptors on the postsynaptic neuron.
    Depending on the neurotransmitter this can be inhibitory (decrease the likelihood of action potential in the postsynaptic neuron), or excitatory (increase the likelihood of an action potential postsynaptic neuron).
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    Will we need to know about Watson? Or would Wundt be enough?
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    (Original post by ellabailey2701)
    Will we need to know about Watson? Or would Wundt be enough?
    Try your best to learn about both of them - it'd be important to write about Wundt in a question asking about the emergence of psychology as a science, but equally important to write about Watson in a question about the behaviourist approach.
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    Hi
    Could someone briefly talk me through the cognitive approach in case it comes up as a 12 marker?
    I don't need a full essay - just some of the key points. The cognitive approach is my weakest point
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    The only thing that I hate about psychopathology is OCD and the behavioural approach to explaining and treating OCD. This is the only thing I left out as it's really long and so complicated. I really hope it doesn't come up!! Who thinks it's likely to come up??
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    What about the 4 definitions of abnormality? And their evaluations 😩 I'm dreading them.
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    (Original post by hopeless.student)
    The only thing that I hate about psychopathology is OCD and the behavioural approach to explaining and treating OCD. This is the only thing I left out as it's really long and so complicated. I really hope it doesn't come up!! Who thinks it's likely to come up??
    These are predictions from loopa

    http://www.loopa.co.uk/unit-2-new-spec-predictions-as-psychology-may-2016
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    (Original post by kaykaayy)
    What about the 4 definitions of abnormality? And their evaluations 😩 I'm dreading them.
    Failure to function adequately
    Strengths
    Matches sufferer's perspective
    Assesses degree of abnormality
    Checklist
    Weakness
    Abnormality is not always accompanied by a dysfunction e.g. psychopaths
    Subjective
    Normal abnormality e.g. mourning
    Personally rewarding abnormality e.g. attention for bulimia sufferers

    Deviation from ideal mental health
    Weakness
    Over-demanding criteria
    Subjective
    Changes over time
    Cultural variation
    Strengths
    Positivity
    Goal setting
    Holistic - considers individual as a whole person

    Deviation from social norms
    Strengths
    Helps people
    Situational and developmental norms
    Clear difference between normal/abnormal behaviour
    Weakness
    Subjective
    Changes over time
    Individualism
    Ethnocentric bias in diagnosis

    Statistical infrequency
    Strengths
    Objective
    No value judgement
    Evidence for assistance
    Based on real data
    Weakness
    Not sure where to draw the line (most agree on 5%)
    Not all infrequent behaviours are abnormal
    Not all abnormal behaviours are infrequent
    Cultural factors (some cultures will have certain behaviour traits that we will find to be 'abnormal'


    Hope this helps!
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    can anyone please " Describe and evaluate the biological approach" (12 marks)
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    Thanks, I already saw them, I'm abit skeptical of these predictions though as anything could come up to be honest :-/ and it's a new spec so predictions are harder to make
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    Will we need to know the different areas of the brain for the cognitive approach?
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    I really don't get the biological approach overall, can someone please explain as I'm anxious of it coming up as a 12 marker😫
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    (Original post by ramseyisbuff)
    can anyone please " Describe and evaluate the biological approach" (12 marks)
    AO1:
    The biological approach emphasises the influence of a persons genes on their behaviour. This can be shown with twin studies, where concordance rates are compared between mono-zygotic twins and di-zygotic twins. Because MZ twins have the same genetic make up, if their concordance rate is higher then it suggests that there is a genetic influence on behaviour.
    The biological approach also explains behaviour in terms on the functioning of the nervous system, including the central nervous system (spinal cord and brain) and the PNS. Neurotransmitters carry chemical messages from one neuron to another across a synapse. As a result, this can influence behaviour, for example, a deficit in serotonin is linked to the symptoms of depression.
    Evolutionary psychologists claim that human behaviour have evolved over time the same way our bodies have as they have been adapted to our stone age environment.

    AO3: [copied]The biological approach isscientific, the use of experimental methods such as lab experiments allows theresearcher rigorous ways of collecting and evaluating evidence. Therefore theresult of a controlled environment is the ability to establish a cause andeffect relationship thus making the research conclusive.
    The biological approach has many practicalapplications, for example the development of drugs to correct chemicalimbalances.
    However the biological approach isreductionist, the approach argues human behaviour can be explained throughgenes and neurotransmitters, it ignores the idea of other factors such ascognitions or emotions.
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    Quite excited for this paper tbh. These topics are my best because there isn't as much evaluation (thank God).
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    What researchers do we need to know specifically, like the ones it tells you on the specification that you have to mention?
    Also what glands do we need to know specifically?
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    (Original post by Mina_)
    AO1:
    The biological approach emphasises the influence of a persons genes on their behaviour. This can be shown with twin studies, where concordance rates are compared between mono-zygotic twins and di-zygotic twins. Because MZ twins have the same genetic make up, if their concordance rate is higher then it suggests that there is a genetic influence on behaviour.
    The biological approach also explains behaviour in terms on the functioning of the nervous system, including the central nervous system (spinal cord and brain) and the PNS. Neurotransmitters carry chemical messages from one neuron to another across a synapse. As a result, this can influence behaviour, for example, a deficit in serotonin is linked to the symptoms of depression.
    Evolutionary psychologists claim that human behaviour have evolved over time the same way our bodies have as they have been adapted to our stone age environment.

    AO3: [copied]The biological approach isscientific, the use of experimental methods such as lab experiments allows theresearcher rigorous ways of collecting and evaluating evidence. Therefore theresult of a controlled environment is the ability to establish a cause andeffect relationship thus making the research conclusive.
    The biological approach has many practicalapplications, for example the development of drugs to correct chemicalimbalances.
    However the biological approach isreductionist, the approach argues human behaviour can be explained throughgenes and neurotransmitters, it ignores the idea of other factors such ascognitions or emotions.
    Biological also needs to include the explanations of the genes, genotype and phenotype which THEN you can elaborate on twin studies along with biological structures, neurotransmitters (excitatory and inhibitory) and finally hormones.

    Other than that everything else seems fine!
 
 
 
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