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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    It's legit you having to work from the minute you do your first lesson. revise over what you have gone over in that lesson and do that throughout the year. It means so when you come to exam time you're not over loaded. Also the topics ( A2) are ALOT longer ie sociology. In my opinion history isn't too hard, but then again that maybe becos I know all the dates. Anyways just be committed and remember it's up you and nothing is impossible.
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    It entirely depends on your work ethic.

    I was one of those people who, at GCSE level, could get away with doing absolutely no revision, and still get good grades. They were just good though, B's and C's. I was definitely capable of getting A's but I didn't try hard enough.If you're like me, then A levels will be pretty horrible. I don't cope well under the stress of learning because I've never experienced it until I got to college.

    If you end up having WJEC as your exam board, good luck to you; for many things, they're the hardest. OCR chemistry is horrible.

    One thing I will say, is from day one, revise. Seriously, that can't be stressed enough. If you don't revise, YOU WILL FAIL. The end.Revision is boring as hell, everyone thinks that - because it is. Don't let that be your reason not to revise though, because you'll kick yourself for it on results day.

    Make a revision timetable. Revise when you have free slots on your regular timetable, so that there's more free time at home.This sounds excessive, but aim for 5 hours of revision per subject, per week. That's A levels though.

    They're very hard work and require pretty much 100% commitment. You will most likely suffer panic attacks, many get depression and other mental illnesses as a result of studying A levels, but there's help available online, here and in your college.I thought it'd be better for you to read all of this than to just say "oh they're awful" or "you'll be fine as long as you revise" because they're only part of the truth.

    A levels are probably the hardest part of education, many say harder than uni. You're social life will dwindle in that time. But it's just two years of your education and your life, but they're so important. Make them count!!
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    They're not as bad as people might make out. I mean, they're quite bad (try not to cry too much over them), but not awful. I'm just about to do A2, so I'll give you my advice!
    You have to remember that when you did GCSEs, SATs looked easy, and when you do AS, GCSEs will look easy, but also that when you do A2, AS will look easy. It's a bit down to perspective. And remember you have a whole year to get to know how to answer questions properly etc., you'll be fine!
    It'll really help if you make revision material you can keep. Don't make notes before each test and then recycle them, but make things like mind maps and flash cards that you can use over and over. It will save soooo much time when you get to the exams! In my opinion having these kind of things ready for when you have to properly start revision for the real exams is more important than memorising everything as you go along. Trust.
    Also, don't start by thinking they'll be horrible because you'll probably enjoy them more than GCSEs because you're no longer doing subjects you hate, hopefully! At least, A Levels, although more stressful (actually saying that GCSE art nearly killed me), have been a better time at school for me than doing GCSEs was.
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    As long as you don't take easy subjects like Media Studies (this is coming from someone who did AS media before having to move out), then they are hard. Just don't take Media, it teaches you nothing; no any valuable skills, and no knowledge at all (unless you've been living under a rock your entire life) 😂😅


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    How can they be this hard? Like I don't understand how this is possible. If you want to get 4 A*s and revise from day one is that possible? Or are these kind of grades not possible for mere mortals ?
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    start revising early and they'll be piss easy
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    Honestly what are the best A-levels. I always hear people say don't do this don't take that but they did the same to me when I was picking my GCSEs and I'm happy with the choices I made. Which A levels are hard or boring and which are interesting and easy to understand
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    I found AS levels were a whole lot more manageable and doable than A2. Also, all of my subjects have been similar from GCSE apart from english literature. Many of the things that were drilled into us at GCSE were reversed at A level
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    Wow, whoever is telling you that must have lived a very sheltered life :') there are a billion things in life that are tougher. Yeah, A-levels are hard work, but then again most things take some effort. This is a major exaggeration, it won't be like getting a limb amputated without anaesthetic or anything. You'll be fine
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    (Original post by alevez2ez)
    They are extremely easy. 80% of people who take Spanish AQA get an A*. Saw this on their website.
    Ok, languages are not easy. The reason why this figure is so high is because A LOT of the people taking languages at A-level are native speakers. Yeah.

    Further Maths A-level also has a very high A* rate, but that's just because the people who stay on to A2 tend to be strong mathematicians (all of my Further Maths A2 class are predicted A* at Maths A-level, then all are B or above for their Further Maths). And yet, Further Maths is so much harder than Maths .....
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    1. Start revising from September
    2. DON'T FALL BEHIND ON NOTES
    3. CHRISTMAS BREAK IS NOT A HOLIDAY. NEITHER IS EASTER.
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    (Original post by adegunt)
    1. Start revising from September
    2. DON'T FALL BEHIND ON NOTES
    3. CHRISTMAS BREAK IS NOT A HOLIDAY. NEITHER IS EASTER.
    4. DO ALL THE EXAM PAPERS
    5. CONSISTENCY IS KEY
    6. ASK YOUR TEACHER EVERYTHING, EVEN THE DUMBEST QUESTIONS

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    (Original post by Bernie2016)
    How hard would an A* in Further Maths be at A-Level? (Presuming some people here probably have obtained that grade)
    I'm sitting my A2 Further Maths exams in about 2 weeks. I've done every past paper in every module, and it's tough. FP3 is the toughest module I've ever done. To get an A* you have to work hard and be prepared to get beaten up by the modules but it's not impossible, I've gotten A*s in most of my mocks now, but at the start I was getting D's. I feel AS further maths was *relatively* easy but A2 has been difficult. Still an amazing A-Level to take though!
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    Well they're harder than GCSE's definetly, for most of the year you could hardly put any work in and still get decent grades in GCSE's, but you can't do that for A levels.

    Als depends on the A levels you do, I do Maths and Further Maths, and I know people who got A's and A*'s at GCSE for maths and got D's or E's at AS level, so it's definitely a step up, with some people not being able to handle the jump in difficulty. But as long as you put it in the work from the beginning of the year you should be fine, but unlike GCSE's you can't really wing it.
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    Compared to any other level 3 qual they are solid, such as a BTEC level 3 is really, really easy compared to any A Level. A levels are considered the most stretching of qualifications. (Depends on subject as well)
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    Im going to be all controversial and say I've almost finished A-Levels and have actually found them easier than GCSE. I got very average GCSE results (2A*, 3As and 7Bs) but came out of my first year at A-Level with AAAB. Some people would say this is because i took so called easy subjects (Film, Media, English Language and Drama) but i suppose thats what makes the process so subjective. If you know what you're good at and stick to it with your options you'll be fine.
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    I'm currently at the end of my AS year. In my opinion, they are not as horrible as some make them out to be. Sure the workload is much bigger, but
    If you are an exceptional or a good student, they are still wingable.

    However, when I say you could wing it, I mean like B/C standard, maybe an A if you're really good. But if you want to do well, or you're a more average student- you WILL have to work for it.

    Of course A2, especially now things are linear is going to be much harder.

    I've maintained the opinion throughout this entire year that if all I had to do was pass, I wouldn't be stressed. I personally could easily get straight Bs in my subjects having only crammed the night before (I take English Lit, Law, Psychology, History).
    But of course cramming is not this effective for everyone. And I have the idiotic dream of going to Cambridge, so I haven't gone down the cramming route this year 🙈

    It really depends on your organisation, intellectual ability, and work ethic as to how difficult A Levels are going to be I think. Good luck!
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    (Original post by Gold-Confetti)
    I'm currently at the end of my AS year. In my opinion, they are not as horrible as some make them out to be. Sure the workload is much bigger, but
    If you are an exceptional or a good student, they are still wingable.

    However, when I say you could wing it, I mean like B/C standard, maybe an A if you're really good. But if you want to do well, or you're a more average student- you WILL have to work for it.

    Of course A2, especially now things are linear is going to be much harder.

    I've maintained the opinion throughout this entire year that if all I had to do was pass, I wouldn't be stressed. I personally could easily get straight Bs in my subjects having only crammed the night before (I take English Lit, Law, Psychology, History).
    But of course cramming is not this effective for everyone. And I have the idiotic dream of going to Cambridge, so I haven't gone down the cramming route this year 🙈

    It really depends on your organisation, intellectual ability, and work ethic as to how difficult A Levels are going to be I think. Good luck!
    (Original post by shaunnaob)
    Im going to be all controversial and say I've almost finished A-Levels and have actually found them easier than GCSE. I got very average GCSE results (2A*, 3As and 7Bs) but came out of my first year at A-Level with AAAB. Some people would say this is because i took so called easy subjects (Film, Media, English Language and Drama) but i suppose thats what makes the process so subjective. If you know what you're good at and stick to it with your options you'll be fine.
    (Original post by Numero Uno)
    Compared to any other level 3 qual they are solid, such as a BTEC level 3 is really, really easy compared to any A Level. A levels are considered the most stretching of qualifications. (Depends on subject as well)
    (Original post by ajay1998)
    Well they're harder than GCSE's definetly, for most of the year you could hardly put any work in and still get decent grades in GCSE's, but you can't do that for A levels.

    Als depends on the A levels you do, I do Maths and Further Maths, and I know people who got A's and A*'s at GCSE for maths and got D's or E's at AS level, so it's definitely a step up, with some people not being able to handle the jump in difficulty. But as long as you put it in the work from the beginning of the year you should be fine, but unlike GCSE's you can't really wing it.
    (Original post by Dino-unicorn)
    I'm sitting my A2 Further Maths exams in about 2 weeks. I've done every past paper in every module, and it's tough. FP3 is the toughest module I've ever done. To get an A* you have to work hard and be prepared to get beaten up by the modules but it's not impossible, I've gotten A*s in most of my mocks now, but at the start I was getting D's. I feel AS further maths was *relatively* easy but A2 has been difficult. Still an amazing A-Level to take though!
    I'm sure all of you will be fine. Don't worry too much.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Moeen_Nawazish

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education...12-months.html


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    What was the process to apply privately?
    (Original post by Yasdyxo)
    I finished year13 last year.. got accepted into the university i wanted but i deferred this year. Most likely will be going this September (90% yes 10% still no) lol
    And i'm currently re-sitting some of my a level units as a private student... but clearly i didnt learn my lesson from 2 years at school.
    I would only do private exams/candidate if you are strict with yourself, well disciplined. But yeah it is possible to do it privately.
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    (Original post by Wan Hury)
    Wagwan. I was wondering if I could get some honest feedback of how life is like whilst studying for your A-levels. I'm starting them in September (hopefully) and I wanted to know what people think of it. I already know it's one of the toughest things anyone could ever do, but other than that, is there anything else? Thanks
    Start looking at mark schemes for exams such as biology as they give you a really good insight into what they're expecting out of the wording of questions and when they give you a graph ect.
 
 
 
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