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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    They do care.

    I disagree, the turnout rate would be quite high. It's the first time that age range would be allowed to vote, and so I think we'd be looking at similar turnout rates to the Scottish referendum where 16&17 year olds could vote(I think it was around 75% for 16-18)
    Which is why the 18-24 turnout is always so low even though for most of them they will be voting for the first time (talking about elections)

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    (Original post by saraxh)
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    I'd just like to say that i'm 16 and I don't pay taxes. But I've been to political conferences and I've gone to protests which have a strong meaning to me. I watch the news and debates. My teacher was shocked at how much I knew about politics I think 16 year old's voting is very debatable.
    Guess what, I'm 15. Me and you know that our peers don't have the same intersts as us. If we want 16+ to vote we must first get more interested into politics, or else what's the point?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    Which is why the 18-24 turnout is always so low even though for most of them they will be voting for the first time (talking about elections)

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    Not comparable. If 16-18 could vote, it would be the first ever that collectively they were given this right. Thus we'd see far greater turnout rates than amongst the 18-24.
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    They do care.
    Lol trust me they don't. When I start talking about politics they just stare at me with confusion.

    I disagree, the turnout rate would be quite high. It's the first time that age range would be allowed to vote, and so I think we'd be looking at similar turnout rates to the Scottish referendum where 16&17 year olds could vote(I think it was around 75% for 16-18)
    I disagree, the turnout rate wouldn't be as high as 75% because if you look at the this referendum the overall turnout was 72% while Scots was 80 odd percent. I'm pretty sure someone mentioned as you go down the age range to 18-24 the turnout gets lower. So 16-17 would be quite low still, even though it's the first time.

    As I said before, they would also need to make politics interesting in the first place to even get them to vote.
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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    Guess what, I'm 15. Me and you know that our peers don't have the same intersts as us. If we want 16+ to vote we must first get more interested into politics, or else what's the point?
    In my school most people talk about politics if something big occurs. Maybe teachers should try to teach us more about politics. Most 16 year old's don't even know what youth Parliament is because we were never told anything about it.
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    According to a poll conducted, 82% of 16-18 backed the remain campaign. Of course the turnout rate would not be 100%, but I think it would be 60+. We'd be looking at at least 700,000 more votes for remain. Although this would not be a win for the remain campaign like I thought, it would certainly have been a damn lot closer(49-51). The turnout rate could even have been a lot higher, maybe matching the 80% of the elderly. It pains me that we'll never know
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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    Not comparable. If 16-18 could vote, it would be the first ever that collectively they were given this right. Thus we'd see far greater turnout rates than amongst the 18-24.
    A one off slightly higher before it plunges back to, what, maybe 20%

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    (Original post by MrMackyTv)
    Lol trust me they don't. When I start talking about politics they just stare at me with confusion.
    Which idiots do that? I care about politics. I thought many others did too.
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    (Original post by Kryptonian)
    Which idiots do that? I care about politics. I thought many others did too.
    Agreed, I hate it when people stereotype 16/17 year olds as "dumb" or "not caring about politics" of course some people wouldn't care about politics, you can say that for every other age groups so what makes us different from them?
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    I hate people who stereotype us. I'm not quite 16 (Wednesday is my birthday), however we should vote. Many of us are well informed and know what we're talking about, and this will affect our future. If we're old enough to have sex, start a family, join the army, pay tax, work full time, and have just completed our GCSEs that will affect our A-Levels and, in turn, our university degrees, hell yes we should have a vote for this referendum
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    (Original post by EnglishMuffin29)
    I hate people who stereotype us. I'm not quite 16 (Wednesday is my birthday), however we should vote. Many of us are well informed and know what we're talking about, and this will affect our future. If we're old enough to have sex, start a family, join the army, pay tax, work full time, and have just completed our GCSEs that will affect our A-Levels and, in turn, our university degrees, hell yes we should have a vote for this referendum
    What would you give too society to earn your right to vote?
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    You lost you sore losers.
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    (Original post by TrueDetective01)
    What would you give too society to earn your right to vote?
    Considering I work 3 jobs, help out at primary schools and our local care home, and do pretty much everything that I can to make my community a better place, I'd like to think that I should have a right to vote in the referendum. I work so much so I can save money for university, as I was originally planning on studying abroad. I'm bilingual, and wanted to move to Spain and teach English there. Now, it will cost so much money and my future will be affecting and honestly, I'm not sure if I have enough to pay for it without borrowing off of my family, which i definitely do not want to do.

    It's not what I give to society, it's the fact that it's my future and my generation's future that will be the most affected, and we will have to deal with the aftermath of a decision that we didn't even want, yet didn't have a voice to say that.

    Besides, Mr/Miss High and Mighty, what do you give to society?
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    "I don't like democracy so will demean the people who disagree with me to justify why democracy is broken"

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    (Original post by teenhorrorstory)
    According to a poll conducted, 82% of 16-18 backed the remain campaign. Of course the turnout rate would not be 100%, but I think it would be 60+. We'd be looking at at least 700,000 more votes for remain. Although this would not be a win for the remain campaign like I thought, it would certainly have been a damn lot closer(49-51). The turnout rate could even have been a lot higher, maybe matching the 80% of the elderly. It pains me that we'll never know
    Why is that of any significance whatsoever? I get it; you don't like the result.. but it make absolutely no difference what the win margin was. A majority is a majority.
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    (Original post by EnglishMuffin29)
    Considering I work 3 jobs, help out at primary schools and our local care home, and do pretty much everything that I can to make my community a better place, I'd like to think that I should have a right to vote in the referendum. I work so much so I can save money for university, as I was originally planning on studying abroad. I'm bilingual, and wanted to move to Spain and teach English there. Now, it will cost so much money and my future will be affecting and honestly, I'm not sure if I have enough to pay for it without borrowing off of my family, which i definitely do not want to do.

    It's not what I give to society, it's the fact that it's my future and my generation's future that will be the most affected, and we will have to deal with the aftermath of a decision that we didn't even want, yet didn't have a voice to say that.

    Besides, Mr/Miss High and Mighty, what do you give to society?
    I don't vote and I cannot vote in the UK albeit I do pay my fair share myself + I am trilingual but too lazy to learn a fourth . I understand your concerns regarding economic uncertainty and the sheer chaos it will cause in the coming years.

    I still maintain that the only people who should be allowed to vote are the people only in full-time jobs yet I don't think TSRians will agree with me on that.
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    (Original post by TrueDetective01)
    I don't vote and I cannot vote in the UK albeit I do pay my fair share myself + I am trilingual but too lazy to learn a fourth . I understand your concerns regarding economic uncertainty and the sheer chaos it will cause in the coming years.

    I still maintain that the only people who should be allowed to vote are the people only in full-time jobs yet I don't think TSRians will agree with me on that.
    So most students, those on benefits, part time workers, new mothers, and pensioners shouldn't be allowed to vote?
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    (Original post by TrueDetective01)
    I don't vote and I cannot vote in the UK albeit I do pay my fair share myself + I am trilingual but too lazy to learn a fourth . I understand your concerns regarding economic uncertainty and the sheer chaos it will cause in the coming years.

    I still maintain that the only people who should be allowed to vote are the people only in full-time jobs yet I don't think TSRians will agree with me on that.
    I can accept that you have a different opinion than me
    On another hand, 3 languages?! Haha I'm impressed, I'm in the midst of learning German and Afrikaans for my family/godmother/boyfriend, and then after that hopefully expanding my Italian knowledge...I kinda forgot how fun learning a language was!
    Out of curiosity, which languages do you speak?
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    (Original post by Blue_Mason)
    Oh please, most 16 - 18 year olds are clueless when it comes to politics and making important decisions.
    You'd be surprised how many of us are aware. Almost everyone I know (of the 16 and 17 year olds) would have voted stay. We have minds of our own.
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    Terrible idea. There are some people of this age that can make a well informed decision having done actual research but most people screaming about how if they had the vote we would have remained are saying that because saying remain seemed like the trendy thing to say and if you said leave you were a racist. Also people of this age will just go on facebook, read some badly written lefty crap from something like buzfeed or the lad Bible and think they are a political expert.
 
 
 
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