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What's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels?

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    Don't spend all your revision time every day reading tsr revision threads go and revise right now

    [Edit: this was meant to be in all caps but my phone's acting up]
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    Personally, if you do not feel passionate about a subject, I would advise you to not take it. A Level's are on another level to GCSE's! What you do in GCSE's is just the tip of the iceberg. No seriously, A Level's literally take the prize, they completely blind side you with stuff you didn't even know existed! Unless you are completely confident with your decision, you; not your parents, not your friends, YOU should be the sole decider of what subjects to take.
    Also, if you want to take 4 subjects, and you are very confident with your abilities, then by all means, go for it! You should take challenges in life and take yourself out of your comfort zone. By doing so, you will be able to witness first hand how amazing of a person you are.
    Last but not least, the preparation tips are given above, but the sole most important survival trip is... BE PREPARED! I cannot stress this enough. I really wish I had drilled this into my head all throughout the 2 years rather than like a day or week before exams. Please don't be like me, learn from my mistakes. After each lesson, if it helps, buy a little A5 notebook and make notes on the topics you covered in that lesson so that you are on top of things. Try and do 1 past paper each month, build up your revision bit by bit, a tower of cards doesn't appear suddenly. Challenge and dare yourself, also produce a revision timetable of some sort that you can follow and after completing a task, give yourself a small reward, maybe a sweet or something that you are prepared to work for and give the stash to your parents or someone else to hide to resist the temptation of course.
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    Work most days for at least an hour and go over your stuff, don't cram for an exam (internal or the real thing)
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    This is aimed at hopeful medicine students

    * Don't have your heart set on getting multiple A* grades, you're just setting yourself up for disappointment.

    * Don't take psychology as your fourth, it's seen as soft. Don't take physics with the EPQ, choose between the two unless you're hardcore.

    * Do not go to your sixth form common room. Literally just don't step foot in there once. Spend your break and lunch time wisely.

    * Don't underestimate these exams, at all, ever. It doesn't matter if you're breezing through the past papers, these exams are very unpredictable and you could be in for a smack if you get big headed.

    * Make sure you've made notes on literally EVERYTHING in the syllabus. This year there was a 6 mark biology question on something that had only a paragraph in the revision book.

    * Your past paper ratio should be split 65/30/5 ... maths/chemistry/biology. You need to understand what mental capabilities the subjects require. Biology is heavily memory based and therefore you need to recall your NOTES rather than doing past papers. Mathematics is almost entirely problem solving, therefore you need to PRACTICE with many, many past papers. Do literally every single maths past paper there is. Before doing that, look up the past grade boundaries and omit the easy ones. Chemistry is in the middle and will be half memory half intuition.

    * Read, cover, look is the age old revision technique taught to you from primary school. It is essential that you can memorise the material learnt and be able to RECALL the material at any time off the top of your head. You can't be reliant on some sort of prompt.

    I could have probably come up with a few more, but here's a last one:

    If your revision isn't making you hate life, then you're probably not revising properly.
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    Start early! Make sure you are making notes throughout the 2 years of your a-level and revise over them that evening they were made. Whenever there's something you don't understand, even if it's something you think is minuscule, still get it clarified or it will come back and haunt you in the exams! Do tons of past papers but remember to stay balanced and don't over-work yourself. Be positive!
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    Two years of not slacking off will be totally worth it in the long run when you can relax a bit more. Don't leave everything until the last minute because that makes things harder to manage. Lastly, ask for help when you're stuck! Trying to teach yourself something isn't always a good idea.
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    Adding to what i posted before:

    Ignore teachers who tell you to do extra reading. Thats for uni. Stick to past papers and DOMINATE them i swear down there is a pattern THERE IS ALWAYS A PATTERN just figure it out and you will excel. Also, start A2 in the Summer after AS because lord knows you wont have enough time.

    Subject specific advice (for my subjects)

    AS Sociology - make flashcards and memorise till the flashcards become photographic memory - got a solid A this way, even though I had no teacher for the majority of the year

    AS/2 Biology - DONT underestimate the power of coursework


    AS/2 Chemistry - DONT underestimate the power of coursework


    AS/2 English Literature - DONT underestimate the power of coursework
    Love reading, because it seriously helps (so many people in my AS took eng lit when they didnt even enjoy reading and ended up dropping out of A2 with terrible AS results)
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    (Original post by Divine Turnip)
    Adding to what i posted before:

    Ignore teachers who tell you to do extra reading. Thats for uni. Stick to past papers and DOMINATE them i swear down there is a pattern THERE IS ALWAYS A PATTERN just figure it out and you will excel. Also, start A2 in the Summer after AS because lord knows you wont have enough time.

    Subject specific advice (for my subjects)

    AS Sociology - make flashcards and memorise till the flashcards become photographic memory - got a solid A this way, even though I had no teacher for the majority of the year

    AS/2 Biology - DONT underestimate the power of coursework


    AS/2 Chemistry - DONT underestimate the power of coursework


    AS/2 English Literature - DONT underestimate the power of coursework
    Love reading, because it seriously helps (so many people in my AS took eng lit when they didnt even enjoy reading and ended up dropping out of A2 with terrible AS results)
    Is there still course work In biology, which exam board did you do


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    I've just done my AS levels but here's some advice from me when starting out:

    -Be organised from the first month onward. Keep your notes in folders/notebooks (whichever you prefer) but make sure course content is separated into manageable chunks. End of year revision will be a lot easier if you have your notes done properly the first time round, as well as understanding content throughout the year.

    -Do wider reading. For most of my subjects this really helped with my understanding, extra quotes, and creating a good work ethic.

    -Make use of your frees! It is SO tempting to waste your free periods, but try and do something study-related.

    -Treat mock exams with respect. That way it will give a more realistic indication of where you're at, which can be useful.
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    Just don't, unless you want to have multiple mental breakdowns.
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    (Original post by She-Ra)
    Your A-levels are done, you're now officially a little bit older and a little bit wiser :moon:

    So what's the essential piece of advice you'd give to someone starting their A-levels?

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    Don't bother with Uni, it's a waste of money and time.
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    Make sure you are completely in love with the subjects that you are choosing. Being interested helps out a lot and you will not want to study a subject that you're not interested in and you're just doing for the prestige.

    Also - start revising at the very beginning of September in your first year. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you won't need to revise that early on - it will help you a lot.
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    (Original post by BRONZEMEDAL1)
    Don't bother with Uni, it's a waste of money and time.
    Why do you say that?
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    (Original post by B_9710)
    Why do you say that?
    Employers want experience, that is all. Qualifications are not highly esteemed because too many people hold degrees, you're looked down on if you get 2.2. If you get 2.1 that's decent. 1st degree will get your colleagues jealous, so don't mention it.

    Work experience is the only thing that contains value.
    Degrees are cheap now.
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    (Original post by BRONZEMEDAL1)
    Employers want experience, that is all. Qualifications are not highly esteemed because too many people hold degrees, you're looked down on if you get 2.2. If you get 2.1 that's decent. 1st degree will get your colleagues jealous, so don't mention it.

    Work experience is the only thing that contains value.
    Degrees are cheap now.
    Get as much work experience as you want in the medicine field but when you come to looking for a job, the people with qualifications will have a higher chance


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    (Original post by Divine Turnip)
    Ignore teachers who tell you to do extra reading. Thats for uni. Stick to past papers and DOMINATE them i swear down there is a pattern THERE IS ALWAYS A PATTERN just figure it out and you will excel. Also, start A2 in the Summer after AS because lord knows you wont have enough time.
    I wouldn't say this applies to all subjects - particularly language students should be reading as much of their foreign language as they can. Also extra reading has greatly helped me with my philosophy essays

    Though I agree that for the majority of subjects it isn't necessary.
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    Qualifications abd work experience are important, but qualifications are the first step because without these you may not even be considered for top jobs but if you have qualifications and no work experience, people with both will have an easier time


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    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Get as much work experience as you want in the medicine field but when you come to looking for a job, the people with qualifications will have a higher chance


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    Medicine!? True,
    but seriously man, how many people are studying medicine, it's only the rich elites who study medicine then they lose themselves up their own bum hole.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I wouldn't say this applies to all subjects - particularly language students should be reading as much of their foreign language as they can. Also extra reading has greatly helped me with my philosophy essays

    Though I agree that for the majority of subjects it isn't necessary.
    You can't get a good future with Philosophy. Sorry to bring you bad weather about your future. Languages yes, Philosophy is a deadweight.
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    (Original post by BRONZEMEDAL1)
    Medicine!? True,
    but seriously man, how many people are studying medicine, it's only the rich elites who study medicine then they lose themselves up their own bum hole.
    And a few other 'respected' jobs, what kind of jobs are you speaking about


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