Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by luckyu)
    that means you had ignored the reaction of the table right?? because i done the same thing.. and then just put the inequality sign in
    lol
    so
    we
    scrwed
    up?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by luckyu)
    that means you had ignored the reaction of the table right?? because i done the same thing.. and then just put the inequality sign in
    HA, i did exactly that :P oh well...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Men
    Am still having mighty nightmares about that paper...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    lol its funny how we all do the same mistake.. wel in the exam i did put the reaction of the table when resolving verticaly but then i crossed it out lol because it wasnt working out and i never thought about putting r is greater or equal to zero.. but if loads of us did the mistake and plus got the intergration wrong that means the boundaries wil have to drop dont u lots think?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    50 i want
    shudnt be higher than 55
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Seriously guys have you lot finished your exams. Those who have enjoy and leave this thread. Those who havent finished, what can I say.

    Anyways majority is authority.

    .A.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Okies, one last thing to clear up for me. I'm getting very confused about question 5c, the vertical circular motion question where the particles have joined up and you have to find the angle they reach when they stop.

    Sounds like most people have agreed on 20.4 degrees. This isn't anything like what I got (41.4). Here's how I did it:

    GPE at start --> GPE at end.
    mga --> 4mgh
    Therefore h = a/4
    This means the angle will be arcos(3/4) right?
    =41.4

    I don't see how this is wrong as there is no other energy to take into account. As far as I see the particle doesn't lose or gain any energy by picking up the second particle.

    EDIT: or is there a loss of energy caused by the impact? Argh, I'm doing badly enough without losing 6 marks on such an easy question. If I got this wrong and then the tension wrong because of it would I lose all 6?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by AlphaWulf)
    I don't see how this is wrong as there is no other energy to take into account. As far as I see the particle doesn't lose or gain any energy by picking up the second particle.

    EDIT: or is there a loss of energy caused by the impact? Argh, I'm doing badly enough without losing 6 marks on such an easy question. If I got this wrong and then the tension wrong because of it would I lose all 6?
    I think it is an inelastic collision so you have to use CLM (conservation of linear momentum).

    You will almost certainly get follow-through marks for the next part of the question.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I think it is an inelastic collision so you have to use CLM (conservation of linear momentum).

    You will almost certainly get follow-through marks for the next part of the question.
    I severely hope so, losing enough marks here as it is. If we assumed that the A boundary was about 55 marks, do you have any idea what the B boundary would be?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AlphaWulf)
    I severely hope so, losing enough marks here as it is. If we assumed that the A boundary was about 55 marks, do you have any idea what the B boundary would be?
    A is probably going to be higher mate, even though we wish it isn't.
    B would be about 5-7 marks below the A.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by AlphaWulf)
    I severely hope so, losing enough marks here as it is. If we assumed that the A boundary was about 55 marks, do you have any idea what the B boundary would be?
    In June 2005, it was 54 for an A and 47 for a B. I hope it's the same this year.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    In June 2005, it was 54 for an A and 47 for a B. I hope it's the same this year.
    That paper was ridiculously difficult. This paper was hard but not anywhere close as hard as that paper, imo.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by The Sherminator)
    That paper was ridiculously difficult. This paper was hard but not anywhere close as hard as that paper, imo.
    In January 2007, it was 56 for an A and 49 for a B. And I found that paper much easier than the one we did.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    In January 2007, it was 56 for an A and 49 for a B. And I found that paper much easier than the one we did.
    Well I think even this sounds high marks. You've got to bear in mind that about 70% of people won't have been able to do that final 7-mark question, and even the rest of the paper was quite hard. I think 56 and 49 sounds a bit high, but it's probably likely.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    In January 2007, it was 56 for an A and 49 for a B. And I found that paper much easier than the one we did.
    Thats very true as well, and the same goes for Jan 08.
    We still have a light at the end of the tunnel.
    And why are you worried anyway? In all the discussion, I haven't seen you make one mistake yet!!
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by The Sherminator)
    Thats very true as well, and the same goes for Jan 08.
    We still have a light at the end of the tunnel.
    And why are you worried anyway? In all the discussion, I haven't seen you make one mistake yet!!
    That's because I haven't posted about the mistakes I made (such as the tension question, where I somehow got T = mg when it was at an angle which is obviously wrong, but I had no time to change it). I'm not worried about getting an A, but I would like something over 95% so that I don't need many marks in FP1 and FP2.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    That's because I haven't posted about the mistakes I made (such as the tension question, where I somehow got T = mg when it was at an angle which is obviously wrong, but I had no time to change it). I'm not worried about getting an A, but I would like something over 95% so that I don't need many marks in FP1 and FP2.
    Ahh the perfectionist :p:

    Anything about 70% is good for me... Although the more the merrier, for the same reason as you, although for FP2 and FP3 instead of FP1
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by .A.)
    Seriously guys have you lot finished your exams. Those who have enjoy and leave this thread. Those who havent finished, what can I say.

    Anyways majority is authority.

    .A.
    SAME GOES FOR YOU MISTER A
    hahahaha
    i got phys 4 5 6 and FP1 left
    one day shud be enough for an A
    for all
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: June 10, 2008

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.