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    Well, my school found out today that Ofsted are coming in tomorrow...

    Obviously it shouldn't affect me too much as a student teacher, so I'm not particularly worried, but I expect it's going to be a tense couple of days. Should be interesting just to see how the process goes and what they think of the school though.
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    My first year clases just gets worse. It's mixed ability, which makes life difficult. I feel like giving up.


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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    My first year clases just gets worse. It's mixed ability, which makes life difficult. I feel like giving up.
    Behaviour is my biggest struggle this placement as well. My first school was much older pupils (14-18) and I didn't really have to do much about behaviour management - a sharp glance at the offending pupil was normally enough to shut them up - so I was mostly focusing on developing my lesson pace, range of activities, questioning, etc.

    I'm now in a lower school, teaching pupils aged 11-14, and my behaviour management is rubbish. I spend so much of my lesson time waiting for them to be quiet, rather than actually teaching.

    I was observed by Ofsted today (didn't really expect to be, as a student teacher) and they said the bit of lesson they observed was "requires improvement", primarily because of my behaviour management which they said disrupted the flow of the lesson.

    I keep being told I'm doing well, but I feel like I can't do half of what I want to because of my behaviour management issues.

    Some of my classes are getting better, because I'm plugging away with sanctions and they're starting to realise that if they keep talking when I'm talking they will come back at break. But in some classes there are so many rude and disruptive kids that I just can't tell who I'm supposed to be sanctioning - it's really difficult.

    Hopefully we'll get there soon...
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Behaviour is my biggest struggle this placement as well. My first school was much older pupils (14-18) and I didn't really have to do much about behaviour management - a sharp glance at the offending pupil was normally enough to shut them up - so I was mostly focusing on developing my lesson pace, range of activities, questioning, etc.

    I'm now in a lower school, teaching pupils aged 11-14, and my behaviour management is rubbish. I spend so much of my lesson time waiting for them to be quiet, rather than actually teaching.

    I was observed by Ofsted today (didn't really expect to be, as a student teacher) and they said the bit of lesson they observed was "requires improvement", primarily because of my behaviour management which they said disrupted the flow of the lesson.

    I keep being told I'm doing well, but I feel like I can't do half of what I want to because of my behaviour management issues.

    Some of my classes are getting better, because I'm plugging away with sanctions and they're starting to realise that if they keep talking when I'm talking they will come back at break. But in some classes there are so many rude and disruptive kids that I just can't tell who I'm supposed to be sanctioning - it's really difficult.

    Hopefully we'll get there soon...
    :hugs: I'm scared of being observed. I almost cracked at the beginning of the year because my primary kids were so bad. I don't think I have any idea what I'm doing because I haven't been formally trained.


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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Behaviour is my biggest struggle this placement as well. My first school was much older pupils (14-18) and I didn't really have to do much about behaviour management - a sharp glance at the offending pupil was normally enough to shut them up - so I was mostly focusing on developing my lesson pace, range of activities, questioning, etc.

    I'm now in a lower school, teaching pupils aged 11-14, and my behaviour management is rubbish. I spend so much of my lesson time waiting for them to be quiet, rather than actually teaching.

    I was observed by Ofsted today (didn't really expect to be, as a student teacher) and they said the bit of lesson they observed was "requires improvement", primarily because of my behaviour management which they said disrupted the flow of the lesson.

    I keep being told I'm doing well, but I feel like I can't do half of what I want to because of my behaviour management issues.

    Some of my classes are getting better, because I'm plugging away with sanctions and they're starting to realise that if they keep talking when I'm talking they will come back at break. But in some classes there are so many rude and disruptive kids that I just can't tell who I'm supposed to be sanctioning - it's really difficult.

    Hopefully we'll get there soon...
    What were your teachers doing letting you be observed?! Getting out of it I presume? They should have been teaching their classes shouldn't they? Unless the logic is that ofsted see what's happening, no 'shows'... In that case I need to get me a PGCE student!


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    (Original post by noodles!)
    What were your teachers doing letting you be observed?! Getting out of it I presume? They should have been teaching their classes shouldn't they? Unless the logic is that ofsted see what's happening, no 'shows'... In that case I need to get me a PGCE student!
    We were told just to carry on as normal, other than that the teachers should be formally observing me rather than sitting outside the classroom getting on with some marking, which they often do.

    No-one expected Ofsted to genuinely observe me though - the assumption was that they'd pop in briefly, realise I was a student (I actually went and told one inspector while the pupils were doing a group task) and then leave after a couple of minutes.

    But tomorrow the teachers are all taking their classes back off me in case Ofsted come to see them - so far I'm the only person in the school who's been observed teaching my subject, which is rather ridiculous.
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    (Original post by noodles!)
    What were your teachers doing letting you be observed?! Getting out of it I presume? They should have been teaching their classes shouldn't they? Unless the logic is that ofsted see what's happening, no 'shows'... In that case I need to get me a PGCE student!


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    I got told by my uni that Ofsted can observe us teach, but the grade isn't for us it's the grade that they are giving your mentor/the school because they are responsible for us.

    However, if your uni/training provider is being observed by Ofsted, you may also get observed teaching and this time the grade does apply to you.

    It's all very confusing!
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    Ah fair enough, I thought it may be permissible but seems bad form to me!


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    (Original post by noodles!)
    Ah fair enough, I thought it may be permissible but seems bad form to me!


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    It depends as well about lesson plans... If the trainee's got the lesson planned and is ready to go then it might make less sense to switch and plan it all again overnight. But it depends if your trainee is good! I an pretty sure I'd come out at needs improvement, as above a lot would be my behaviour management as in this second school I find it much harder. I'd be terrified if I had to do it, I think it's pretty unfair to the schools. They're supposed to be helping you improve but that doesn't mean you'll be excellent straight away. If anything they should look at the feedback they've given you etc, much more relevant to show if they're supporting you. But then I guess if you were doing really badly the school would ask you not to teach that day.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by myrtille)
    Behaviour is my biggest struggle this placement as well. My first school was much older pupils (14-18) and I didn't really have to do much about behaviour management - a sharp glance at the offending pupil was normally enough to shut them up - so I was mostly focusing on developing my lesson pace, range of activities, questioning, etc.

    I'm now in a lower school, teaching pupils aged 11-14, and my behaviour management is rubbish. I spend so much of my lesson time waiting for them to be quiet, rather than actually teaching.

    I was observed by Ofsted today (didn't really expect to be, as a student teacher) and they said the bit of lesson they observed was "requires improvement", primarily because of my behaviour management which they said disrupted the flow of the lesson.

    I keep being told I'm doing well, but I feel like I can't do half of what I want to because of my behaviour management issues.

    Some of my classes are getting better, because I'm plugging away with sanctions and they're starting to realise that if they keep talking when I'm talking they will come back at break. But in some classes there are so many rude and disruptive kids that I just can't tell who I'm supposed to be sanctioning - it's really difficult.

    Hopefully we'll get there soon...
    To the bolded - if it is any help - I have the EXACT same problem. I get through about half a lesson plan.
    In my school, they don't even bother turning up to formal detentions, so there is no point keeping them back at break time.
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    (Original post by smartarse1983)
    To the bolded - if it is any help - I have the EXACT same problem. I get through about half a lesson plan.
    In my school, they don't even bother turning up to formal detentions, so there is no point keeping them back at break time.
    I'm in quite a nice school though, behaviour overall isn't bad, but it is in those classes and particularly in my subject area (when I observed those groups before starting teaching, I already had concerns about their behaviour as some are extremely rude). The fact that kids in the school are generally quite well-behaved just makes me feel rubbish about myself.

    They do normally turn up to a breaktime detention (otherwise they get a formal school detention with the deputy head, and that's a big deal in my school), but it doesn't seem to deter them from being just as bad the following lesson.

    Today I gave a kid an OKish score on their report card (they'd worked well but shouted out a few times, which was nothing compared with the rest of the class) and my mentor (who was sitting just outside the classroom) said afterwards that she thought he'd been really bad and had been making sily noises. I hadn't even realised because another pupil had been making noises and someone else was banging on the table a load of others were chatting...

    3 of my groups are absolutely fine, but I'm finding the other 4 really challenging. 2 of the difficult groups are ones I only see once a week, so it's not easy to build up consistency. I've taught them 3 times so far, compared with 12 times for some of my other groups, so that isn't helping. Also, 3 out of 4 of the difficult groups are Year 9s, which I'm sure doesn't come as a surprise to anyone!
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm in quite a nice school though, behaviour overall isn't bad, but it is in those classes and particularly in my subject area (when I observed those groups before starting teaching, I already had concerns about their behaviour as some are extremely rude). The fact that kids in the school are generally quite well-behaved just makes me feel rubbish about myself.

    T
    Today I gave a kid an OKish score on their report card (they'd worked well but shouted out a few times, which was nothing compared with the rest of the class) and my mentor (who was sitting just outside the classroom) said afterwards that she thought he'd been really bad and had been making sily noises. I hadn't even realised because another pupil had been making noises and someone else was banging on the table a load of others were chatting...
    This sounds exactly like me ( though my school is not a nice school). When I observed the group before starting, the normal class teacher was having issues.

    Teachers had started leaving me alone with them, but behaviour became so bad ( even though I am giving out bad behaviour points, detentions) that they have had to revert to sitting in the back of the room again, so that they are on hand to park at least 1 pupil per lesson to another room.

    There always seems to be some kind of behaviour mishap that I do not notice (name calling/contra-band mobile phone use/not working) because I am generally stuck battling the rude and defiant ones at the top of the room

    All I keep hoping is that next year - I can start from September, go over my own ground rules on Day One, and the fact that I will be a 'proper' teacher should have some clout. I hope!
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    (Original post by smartarse1983)
    This sounds exactly like me ( though my school is not a nice school). When I observed the group before starting, the normal class teacher was having issues.

    Teachers had started leaving me alone with them, but behaviour became so bad ( even though I am giving out bad behaviour points, detentions) that they have had to revert to sitting in the back of the room again, so that they are on hand to park at least 1 pupil per lesson to another room.

    There always seems to be some kind of behaviour mishap that I do not notice (name calling/contra-band mobile phone use/not working) because I am generally stuck battling the rude and defiant ones at the top of the room

    All I keep hoping is that next year - I can start from September, go over my own ground rules on Day One, and the fact that I will be a 'proper' teacher should have some clout. I hope!
    My HoD hung around outside the classrooms I taught in on Friday afternoon and hauled some pupils out to have a go at them. One of the classes was actually better than usual (I'd just put them in a new seating plan and gone through ground rules again) but there were a few boys being really silly and off-task. Now she's spoken to them I'm going to move them to sit on their own, and hopefully they'll be less likely to question me since the HoD is involved.

    At the end of the day we had a long chat, and I had a bit of a cry, and the department is arranging for me to do some observations in other departments, with teachers who they think are particularly good at behaviour management. Also they've talked to me about other strategies (getting form tutors and heads of year involved, putting them on department report, etc.) that I haven't used yet.

    I think next week is going to be a real battle as I really try to get a grip on this, but hopefully it will be worth it in the long run. And like you, I'm really hoping that when I have my own classes things will be easier. I'm finding the whole "but that's not how Miss_____ does it!" thing really frustrating at the moment.
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    (Original post by myrtille)
    I'm finding the whole "but that's not how Miss_____ does it!" thing really frustrating at the moment.
    You tell them firmly, "I am clearly not Miss_____, so I will be doing it my way. If anyone has a problem, see me after the lesson." No one ever wants to do that!

    Behaviour management is an ongoing struggle for most teachers, even the most experienced will have issues. I have classes I can control amazingly, some classes full of the most challenging pupils, and other classes - some you wouldn't expect, that I completely let fall apart and walk all over me. Sometimes you can try every trick in the book, and it just doesn't work. Often you can blame some of it on the time of the day, or the lesson content, or something happening outside the classroom. Remember that whenever a pupil is rude to you, they almost NEVER mean it. It's something external that has made them blow up at you.

    Just keep trying, you're still learning. It will get easier, and observing teachers who are good at behaviour management is a very good idea. Best of luck
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    Does anyone else feel like they are working weekends too?
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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Does anyone else feel like they are working weekends too?
    Probably every teacher in the country at the moment! I think I'm gonna end up with rickets the way things are going!


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    (Original post by sunfowers01)
    Does anyone else feel like they are working weekends too?

    I am in a course lull (finished first school, not started second, done last essay) so all I have to do right now is plan a couple of interventions, catch up on 2 of my reflective tasks and job stuff! Which is scary but so much less work than normal. It's amazing! I actually went to a friends house for a BBQ yesterday!!!

    On the weekends note, in the school I'm about to go in to they actually WERE working weekends before Easter. They were expecting ofsted any day and they were coming in 7 days a week. Oftsed didn't come so now I'm pretty scared about when I go back there, I don't know if I'll be able to cope working weekends PLUS fitting in all the planning I'd usually do somewhere especially considering KS1 planning was taking me longer than the actual lessons, so with an increased timetable I don't know what will happen anyway!

    xxx
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    (Original post by Kidders)
    I'm doing Secondary English so having all the fun associated with that
    You can be a hero if you teach the kids how to spell its/it's and your/you're, etc.
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    I hate my school. I actually hate it.

    I do not know what is wrong - I am following the school discipline policy to the letter, I am giving merits and praise, detentions and bad behaviour points. But for some reason, every single class I teach has decided to stop listening to me. I thought it was just because last week was the first week back, but it has carried on into this week too.

    I had a pupil walk out in all 3 of my lessons today. I was called a ***** in year 8, a **** by year 9 and told to f-off in year 7. In year 7 I spent all lesson trying to explain the present tense, and every single one of them said 'I don't get it' because NONE of them were listening at one point, and then those that were couldn't hear over the top of those that were refusing to shut-up.
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    (Original post by smartarse1983)
    I hate my school. I actually hate it.

    I do not know what is wrong - I am following the school discipline policy to the letter, I am giving merits and praise, detentions and bad behaviour points. But for some reason, every single class I teach has decided to stop listening to me. I thought it was just because last week was the first week back, but it has carried on into this week too.

    I had a pupil walk out in all 3 of my lessons today. I was called a ***** in year 8, a **** by year 9 and told to f-off in year 7. In year 7 I spent all lesson trying to explain the present tense, and every single one of them said 'I don't get it' because NONE of them were listening at one point, and then those that were couldn't hear over the top of those that were refusing to shut-up.

    I am in a tough school in my NQT year so I completely empathise with you.

    Are you getting support with kids swearing at you? That should be an exclusion. What is your mentor doing about it?
 
 
 
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