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The Physics PHYA2 thread! 5th June 2013 Watch

  • View Poll Results: What mark do you think you got out of 70?
    0-20
    6
    3.00%
    21-40
    12
    6.00%
    41-50
    29
    14.50%
    51-60
    79
    39.50%
    61-70
    74
    37.00%

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    (Original post by Boop.)
    Did anyone notice that the drawing graph question was the same as Q3b on this June 2009 paper? http://www.gcephysics.com/past-paper...W-QP-JUN09.PDF
    Yeah I knew it had come up before and I could remember doing it so I was very happy.

    (Original post by Tuya)
    Anyways, this is my proposal for the graph. The elements they are looking for (I think) although can be exaggerated a little are...
    1. A straight line to the oil ( or a very slight bend towards the end, as you never know, the air could be really humid, etc...)
    2. Sudden drop in acceleration, can be over a small period of time I guess, but mine was vertical
    3. Terminal velocity reached in oil, quicker, and lower than that in air ( and then maybe a sudden drop to finish?)
    Attachment 223717
    I think this is 3 but, you never know...
    I've exaggerated a little, but as I said, depending on conditions I don't see why this couldn't happen...


    Posted from the TSR iPad app
    I think they're going to want a line of constant gradient up to T1, a sloping drop off as it decelerates in the oil and then a flat line to show terminal velocity (and then possibly a vertical line to 0 when it hits the bottom). Or, possibly a line which curves upwards into the flat if you want to argue that the ball would accelerate even in the oil which is unlikely but could be given.

    (Original post by Aarongreatbanks)
    I think I lost 18-14 so that's 52-56/70
    (Original post by Aarongreatbanks)

    I think I need about 92 UMS so a 90-94 range to get an A in AS physics as I got 42 on my ISA (should be a B =42ums) and 106 UMS on unit 1!

    What is the range of grades for those marks about and will I get 92 UMS?

    I'd think those marks will be around 94-96 UMS. With your Unit 1 I'd think you'll get an A overall.
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    (Original post by 1029384756)
    Nope it was accelerating and acceleration decreased to 0. I completely messed up and said the deceleration was decreasing like in a past paper
    It was the same question as a past paper. It is definitely deceleration
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    (Original post by HenryD)
    Yeah I knew it had come up before and I could remember doing it so I was very happy.


    I think they're going to want a line of constant gradient up to T1, a sloping drop off as it decelerates in the oil and then a flat line to show terminal velocity (and then possibly a vertical line to 0 when it hits the bottom). Or, possibly a line which curves upwards into the flat if you want to argue that the ball would accelerate even in the oil which is unlikely but could be given.


    I'd think those marks will be around 94-96 UMS. With your Unit 1 I'd think you'll get an A overall.
    I thought that but I can't see the grade boundary being above 50 for an A
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    Anyone got a copy of this paper?
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    (Original post by ClarkyC...)
    It was the same question as a past paper. It is definitely deceleration
    That's what I thought but think about it the gradient is acceleration and its ALWAYS positive until it levels off. If it decelerated the gradient would be negative
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    I counted 43 squares for the area under the graph, would this be wrong?
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    (Original post by masryboy94)
    0.44N

    Edit: sorry realised what you just said.

    i think they said that the diameter of a sphere metal ball was  2.2\times10^-2 and that the density was  8100 kgm^-3 and you had to use v = \frac{4}{3}\pi(\frac{D}{2})^3 and then you use  m = vp then final answer you then times by 9.81 to get 0.44N
    Oh darn I can't seem to get 0.44 I did all the working but I think I might have done a calculator error somewhere, how many marks do you lose?
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    For the question on define frequency ..

    i said it is the reciprocal of time period .. but also i wrote something wrong like it the number of waves passing a point per cycle... will they ignore the second bit ... and will i get the mark.
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    (Original post by trentjoseph007)
    For the question on define frequency ..

    i said it is the reciprocal of time period .. but also i wrote something wrong like it the number of waves passing a point per cycle... will they ignore the second bit ... and will i get the mark.
    What you want them to do it ignore the first bit the second bit's right
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    (Original post by 1029384756)
    That's what I thought but think about it the gradient is acceleration and its ALWAYS positive until it levels off. If it decelerated the gradient would be negative
    It's not, it's negative when it hits the oil
    http://www.gcephysics.com/past-paper...W-QP-JUN09.PDF
    3B
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    (Original post by HenryD)
    It's not, it's negative when it hits the oil
    http://www.gcephysics.com/past-paper...W-QP-JUN09.PDF
    3B
    You talking about the graph? I'm on about the 6marker
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    (Original post by Tuya)
    Anyways, this is my proposal for the graph. The elements they are looking for (I think) although can be exaggerated a little are...
    1. A straight line to the oil ( or a very slight bend towards the end, as you never know, the air could be really humid, etc...)
    2. Sudden drop in acceleration, can be over a small period of time I guess, but mine was vertical
    3. Terminal velocity reached in oil, quicker, and lower than that in air ( and then maybe a sudden drop to finish?)
    Attachment 223717
    I think this is 3 but, you never know...
    I've exaggerated a little, but as I said, depending on conditions I don't see why this couldn't happen...


    Posted from the TSR iPad app
    That's what I got!
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    For the bullet one can you say:
    They hit the floor at the same time as the only force that acts is gravity and effects them the same amount. Therefore s=ut as a=0 and as B has smaller u it will have smaller s as t is same for both?
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    got phya4 in 7 days, i SERIOUSLY need to smash that, gonna need atleast 90 UMS :'(
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    Slightly irrelevant, but has anyone watched that mythbusters episode where they fire and drop a bullet at the same time, and try to prove they hit the ground at the same time... Which they do eventually I think


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    (Original post by masryboy94)
    got phya4 in 7 days, i SERIOUSLY need to smash that, gonna need atleast 90 UMS :'(
    You will definitely get it m8! Good luck!
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    What do people think the a,b,c grade boundaries will be?
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    (Original post by HenryD)
    It's not, it's negative when it hits the oil
    http://www.gcephysics.com/past-paper...W-QP-JUN09.PDF
    3B
    Possibly but I think that's specifically for that mystery liquid. Ball A didn't have an deceleration with oil, so I don't think B should either.
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    (Original post by 1029384756)
    That's what I thought but think about it the gradient is acceleration and its ALWAYS positive until it levels off. If it decelerated the gradient would be negative
    Hmm I'm not sure. I know what you mean but equally, I still think it would be decelerating
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    (Original post by Bookaky)
    For the graph about the ball and the oil I think it is debatable. Surely the ball would continue to accelerate in the oil for only a short period of time and then level off for terminal velocity?
    Thats what I put I think I remember it from an older past paper, I said that the ball didnt decelerate, but that it still accelerated in the fluid, the acceleration was decreasing with time, not sure if im right though..
 
 
 
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