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    I look at the readings, but I feel studying them alone is worthless; I will just forget anyway because then I won't have a context to help me remember them. Well, except if the kanji has one single reading, like 員 (イン).

    And there are always the compounds which aren't based on the readings, like 今日 og 土産...
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    (Original post by stifa)
    I look at the readings, but I feel studying them alone is worthless; I will just forget anyway because then I won't have a context to help me remember them. Well, except if the kanji has one single reading, like 員 (イン).

    And there are always the compounds which aren't based on the readings, like 今日 og 土産...
    土産? What's that? どさん?Oh but they said it isn't based on the readings... wtf is it? Ohhh みやげ!
    ↑Me just now lol.

    And then I looked in the dictionary and it actually can also be read as どさん lol.
    ど‐さん【土産】
    《「とさん」とも》
    1 その土地の産物。
    2 みやげもの。 みやげ。

    Japanese is fun XD
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    (Original post by Ash S)
    土産? What's that? どさん?Oh but they said it isn't based on the readings... wtf is it? Ohhh みやげ!
    ↑Me just now lol.

    And then I looked in the dictionary and it actually can also be read as どさん lol.
    ど‐さん【土産】
    《「とさん」とも》
    1 その土地の産物。
    2 みやげもの。 みやげ。

    Japanese is fun XD
    Considering the f'd up spelling of English, that is kind of acceptable in my opinion.
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    Do you want to say you have been studying since 4 year ago? If so you should write 私は4ねん前から. Also, usually people don't use を for べんきょうする.

    Did you want to write よわらない? But I feel like that doesn't make sense "My katakana and kanji are not weak".
    :adore: ARIGATOU! Gosh I had a feeling I sounded nonsensical in some parts (Google you seem a little less credible in checking what I've written now...) and I'm glad you corrected me. Yeah I have been learning for 4 years but doing it by yourself with lack of correction is incredibly difficult as you have pointed out with my mistakes. I think I would have written My Katakana and Kanji are weak (because I do suck at Katakana and Kanji) and I actually have no idea what I've written now ...
    No No Now I do: I meant wakaranai: Kanji to Katankana wakaranai. I have no idea where the yo came from

    That's a good way to remember the kanji, but not actually the true etymology! The top bit of that kanji didn't used to be 人 at all but was actually a plant (the same radical that you see at the top of 英 in 英語 [and also many others like flower 花])

    One of the reasons it's so hard to guess what many kanji mean just by looking at it is because they have changed ALOT since they were first created. Even as recently as 1946 they were still changing the shape of kanji
    Oh okay, I just remember seeing it somewhere in one of those ideogram books that uses pictures to morph into Kanji to help you remember but I didn't know that wasn't the correct etymology, thank you for telling I shall no longer pass on that lie hahaha.

    Wow you seem really knowledgeable in Japanese? How long have you been learning

    (P.S anata no namae ga daisuki. )
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    I was wondering if anyone could help me with a problem

    Suppose I search for 'blame' on an online dictionary, I get the result ''seme, tenka, hinan, kyuudan''
    Is there any dictionary that shows which of the results are the most common in terms of usage? :beard:
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    (Original post by eterna)
    I was wondering if anyone could help me with a problem

    Suppose I search for 'blame' on an online dictionary, I get the result ''seme, tenka, hinan, kyuudan''
    Is there any dictionary that shows which of the results are the most common in terms of usage? :beard:
    I recommend this dictionary, Denshi Jisho (Electronic Dictionary ) and I've linked the word you want below

    http://jisho.org/words?jap=&eng=blame&dict=edict

    Its a good dictionary because you can only choose to show common used words plus it has sentences with the word used, well most of the time.

    Lightening quick response in early times of the morning! I should be doing an essay now but oh weelllll

    Hope that helps ^^
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    (Original post by Scootaloo)
    I recommend this dictionary, Denshi Jisho (Electronic Dictionary ) and I've linked the word you want below

    http://jisho.org/words?jap=&eng=blame&dict=edict

    Its a good dictionary because you can only choose to show common used words plus it has sentences with the word used, well most of the time.

    Lightening quick response in early times of the morning! I should be doing an essay now but oh weelllll

    Hope that helps ^^
    ah thanks! That's a much better dictionary :five:
    so in that list, is it ordered by usage?
    Because while watching anime, I often hear semeru and not kyuudan. :beard:
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    (Original post by eterna)
    I was wondering if anyone could help me with a problem

    Suppose I search for 'blame' on an online dictionary, I get the result ''seme, tenka, hinan, kyuudan''
    Is there any dictionary that shows which of the results are the most common in terms of usage? :beard:
    The words are way different lol.
    転嫁 is like shifting your own blame/responsibility onto somebody else
    非難 is like general blame, criticizing somebody for a mistake or whatever.
    糾弾 is much more serious like for corruption or something with serious responsibility. A good translation would probably be 'denounce'.

    edit: and remember the last two and 責める are not blame as in "you are the one who did this. it's your fault", they are more like to criticise or attack somebody (over something they did).
    If you mean to blame as in establishing who is at fault you could use among other expressions ~~~のせいにする
    ex. お前のせいだ! - It's your fault!
    それを 俺のせいに しないでくれ! - Don't blame me for that!
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    What is the most difficult, when I begin to learn Japanese? the letters? the pronunciation? vocabularies? others? Do you learn Japanese letters from the beginning or later on?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    What is the most difficult, when I begin to learn Japanese? the letters? the pronunciation? vocabularies? others? Do you learn Japanese letters from the beginning or later on?
    There are no letters in Japanese but syllables.

    I would suggest learning the syllabaries first before anything which will allow you to get used to the kana while you learn the grammar and to avoid romaji.

    As for what's the hardest, it depends on the learner but I don't think people have trouble with the pronunciation, mainly the kanji and/or vocabulary.
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    I learnt the 'letters' including all the general use kanji before I started properly trying to learn the rest of the language. Knowing the meaning of the kanji definitely helps with remembering vocabulary, I find.
    If we make a distinction between pronunciation and accent/intonation then we can say that pronunciation is relatively easy but the pitch-accent might take a bit of getting used to.
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    There are no letters in Japanese but syllables.
    (...)
    I see. Those are Japanese ideographs and not letters, right?

    (Original post by Xurvi)
    (...)
    I would suggest learning the syllabaries first before anything which will allow you to get used to the kana while you learn the grammar and to avoid romaji.
    (...)
    Is romaji a dialect in Japan or what is that? How much dialects are there in Japan?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I see. Those are Japanese ideographs and not letters, right?

    Is romaji a dialect in Japan or what is that? How much dialects are there in Japan?
    Romaji is Japanese written using the roman alphabet. There are around 14 dialects in Japan
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    (Original post by Im_a_cyborg)
    Romaji is Japanese written using the roman alphabet. There are around 14 dialects in Japan
    Do I have this right that kanji is writing with Japanese ideographs whereas romanji contains roman letters which are use by European people?
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Does I have right this that kanji is writing with Japanese ideographs whereas romanji contains roman letters which are use by European people?
    Yes, kanji is made up of ideographs (pictures with a meaning) whereas romaji is an anglicised version of Japanese.


    Also, your English doesn't make much sense. "does i have right" should be written as "do i have this right" or "is this right"

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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    I see. Those are Japanese ideographs and not letters, right?



    Is romaji a dialect in Japan or what is that? How much dialects are there in Japan?
    Letters represent a sound (a phoneme : a vowel or consonant) but Japanese uses syllables (a mora : consonant+vowel compound) with the exception of the ん which is a single consonant n. Those syllabaries (the proper name of "alphabets" that contains syllables instead of letters) are called hiragana ひらがな and katakana カタカナ and form the writing system of the kana.
    The more complex characters are the kanji 漢字, imported from China around the 4th or 5th century if I recall right.
    More info on wikipedia.

    Romaji is the transcription of Japanese using roman letters. There are a few systems, like the one called Hepburn, that will transcribe things differently.
    Example:
    Enyou
    En'you
    Enyō
    En'yō
    ... are all valid transcriptions for
    援用 - えんよう
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    Romaji is the transcription of Japanese using roman letters. There are a few systems, like the one called Hepburn, that will transcribe things differently.
    Example:
    Byouin
    Byou'in
    Byōin
    Byō'in
    ... are all valid transcriptions for
    病院 - びょういん
    What are the systems that use a ' between vowels like that? I've never seen that before.
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    (Original post by stifa)
    初めまして ティムさん! 元気ですか?

    (and use spaces occationally, or else TSR will replace some of your kana/kanji with those ?-diamonds...
    はい、元気です、ども
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