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    (Original post by Scootaloo)
    Oh wow you're so lucky, I've always wanted to go to Japan and I hope furthering my education would take me there some day.

    I did want to do biology course as part of Japan's Global 30 programm but then I realised that I'd have very little financial support plus they don't offer genetics directly

    あなたが日本にどこ 住 ん で い ますか?
    You can always go there after uni, that's what I did. I studied science at uni but got a job through the JET Programme.

    私は 埼玉県に住んでいます. アパートから 東京まで は45分だけ かかりますよ!
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    (Original post by atheistwithfaith)
    You can always go there after uni, that's what I did. I studied science at uni but got a job through the JET Programme.

    私は 埼玉県に住んでいます. アパートから 東京まで は45分だけ かかりますよ!
    Adding 'Do JET Program' to my bucketlist'
    I think I'll do that afterwards, take a year out of studying and then return to studying once I've finished.

    Does your teaching position have you speaking a lot of Japanese?
    Also what are the children you teach like?
    Teaching younger people that are unenthusiastic and rude is the suckiest thing ever...
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    Hey, I just signed up or some JLPT prep classes at the SOAS language centre. But I didn't find where I could sign up to actually take the exam. Does anyone who has taken it (or is planning to take it) know?
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    (Original post by miniteen)
    Hey, I just signed up or some JLPT prep classes at the SOAS language centre. But I didn't find where I could sign up to actually take the exam. Does anyone who has taken it (or is planning to take it) know?
    It depends on where you live.

    The list is here: http://www.jlpt.jp/e/application/overseas_list.html

    You need to contact one of the institutions close to you. You'll then register with them to one of their exams.
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    It depends on where you live.

    The list is here: http://www.jlpt.jp/e/application/overseas_list.html

    You need to contact one of the institutions close to you. You'll then register with them to one of their exams.
    Hey, will you be taking the JLPT?
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    (Original post by miniteen)
    Hey, will you be taking the JLPT?
    I took N4 last year. I might try N3 in the December 2013 session after my year abroad but I don't intend to take the exam this year.

    Are you taking N2 or N1?
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I took N4 last year. I might try N3 in the December 2013 session after my year abroad but I don't intend to take the exam this year.

    Are you taking N2 or N1?
    Aiming for N1 as the course I took this year was between N2 and N1 and I got a a first on the course (and a 76 in the exam! =D) I am a little worried though as I've tried some sample questions and I find them extremely hard (i.e. haven't managed to answer any correctly ><.) Hopefully Chinese will help though! (And I'm hoping to sit in on Japanese Literature classes this year!)
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    (Original post by miniteen)
    Aiming for N1 as the course I took this year was between N2 and N1 and I got a a first on the course (and a 76 in the exam! =D) I am a little worried though as I've tried some sample questions and I find them extremely hard (i.e. haven't managed to answer any correctly ><.) Hopefully Chinese will help though! (And I'm hoping to sit in on Japanese Literature classes this year!)
    I heard N1 was really hard, yeah, especially on grammar so Literature classes could help I guess. Fortunately you only have to answer correctly on about half the questions to pass!
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I heard N1 was really hard, yeah, especially on grammar so Literature classes could help I guess. Fortunately you only have to answer correctly on about half the questions to pass!
    Yeah.. Just had a look at the vocab. T.T'''' I think I'll take it twice this year, but realistically will only pass in about 11 months time. Y.Y'''
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    I heard N1 was really hard, yeah, especially on grammar so Literature classes could help I guess. Fortunately you only have to answer correctly on about half the questions to pass!
    Actually, what percentage of the questions you have to get correct in order to pass isn't known in advance. It's determined once the test has been taken, based on the scores of all of the applicants. If the average score increases, the pass mark also increases.

    N1 is only hard if you're not ready for it. If you're good at Japanese, then it's easy. I did worse on N2 than I did on N1.
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    (Original post by Azimuth)
    Actually, what percentage of the questions you have to get correct in order to pass isn't known in advance. It's determined once the test has been taken, based on the scores of all of the applicants. If the average score increases, the pass mark also increases.
    You're right, I forgot about that detail!
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    Lol. Thanks guys. You're basically saying we need to be in the top 30% of all applicants taking the exam to pass. (That's the average amount of applicants who passed last time.) ><''' Well, I just printed out the vocab list for JLPT 1. I know quite a few words, but most of them I do not know. I've separated the list into 7 blocks of 25 pages, each page with about 20 words. If I can learn about one list per week, I should be able to know all the vocab in 2 months. That's 500 words of vocab a week, and my university units this year are all Chinese and Korean. I wonder how I'm ever going to manage. I might just pass it twice, in December as a practice, and in July as the real "goal." Oh my god, what am I getting myself into... Azimuth, how good were you in Japanese when you passed it? I've spent three months in Japan, but in the meantime I lived in China and my head is filled with other languages. I did take a Higher intermediate course in Japanese at SOAS last year though (and I got an overall grade of 75 so... I mustn't have been that bad) but I'm still pretty worried. @[email protected]'''
    Any tips you could give me?
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    (Original post by miniteen)
    Lol. Thanks guys. You're basically saying we need to be in the top 30% of all applicants taking the exam to pass. (That's the average amount of applicants who passed last time.) ><''' Well, I just printed out the vocab list for JLPT 1. I know quite a few words, but most of them I do not know. I've separated the list into 7 blocks of 25 pages, each page with about 20 words. If I can learn about one list per week, I should be able to know all the vocab in 2 months. That's 500 words of vocab a week, and my university units this year are all Chinese and Korean. I wonder how I'm ever going to manage. I might just pass it twice, in December as a practice, and in July as the real "goal." Oh my god, what am I getting myself into... Azimuth, how good were you in Japanese when you passed it? I've spent three months in Japan, but in the meantime I lived in China and my head is filled with other languages. I did take a Higher intermediate course in Japanese at SOAS last year though (and I got an overall grade of 75 so... I mustn't have been that bad) but I'm still pretty worried. @[email protected]'''
    Any tips you could give me?
    I think that that's overkill. You don't need to know the entirety of the vocab list; only a tiny minority of those words are actually going to come up, and at this level, you should be able to figure out a good amount of unfamiliar words via context and/or kanji. I didn't actually study for N1 beyond going through the list of grammar points on the morning of the exam, but if you really wanted to study something, I'd recommend going through that. There's plenty of unguessable stuff on there, but again only a tiny amount of it actually comes up.

    The best way to be ready for the JLPT is to be used to Japanese. If you're reading and listening to Japanese in your daily life, you're doing the right thing. I mean, if you really want to go through the vocab list, it's not like it's going to harm you, but I would say not to do it at the expense of actually using (reading, mostly) real Japanese.

    When I passed N1 I'd been studying for a bit over three years, and I'd been in Japan for about three months.
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    こんばんは!

    I was wondering if someone could help me out a bit. I'm just beginning to learn the language, and so following some advice I saw on here, I've been learning ひらがな and been doing ok with it. I guess next up I'll try to get to grips with かたかな (to put it in perspective just writing these words out is taking me an awful long time!). What I wanted to know was, when should I start trying to actually learn some vocab / grammar? Should I try and get the syllabaries down perfectly and then go, or should I be jumping in now?

    I have access to げんきbut it's sort of hard to know how to proceed. As another small question, in my book, こんばんは (as I wrote at the beginning) is transcribed as 'konbanwa'. Why is it not 'konbanha', or alternatively, こんばんわ?

    ありがとお ございます!
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    (Original post by Dann)
    こんばんは!

    I was wondering if someone could help me out a bit. I'm just beginning to learn the language, and so following some advice I saw on here, I've been learning ひらがな and been doing ok with it. I guess next up I'll try to get to grips with かたかな (to put it in perspective just writing these words out is taking me an awful long time!). What I wanted to know was, when should I start trying to actually learn some vocab / grammar? Should I try and get the syllabaries down perfectly and then go, or should I be jumping in now?

    I have access to げんきbut it's sort of hard to know how to proceed. As another small question, in my book, こんばんは (as I wrote at the beginning) is transcribed as 'konbanwa'. Why is it not 'konbanha', or alternatively, こんばんわ?

    ありがとお ございます!
    I think learning vocab/grammar is really important - but I would highly recommend mastering hiragana and katakana (and simple Kanji if you can bring yourself to it!) first, to stop yourself using romaji. It's up to you in what order you learn I suppose - I don't proclaim to know the key to linguistics - but I've found it helpful to learn grammar points, as then it is easier to incorporate vocab you can pick up quickly, as opposed to the other way around.

    For your second question, the 'wa' sound in konnichiwa/konbanwa actually acts as a particle - wa as a particle is always written as は, that's just how it is. The konnichi and konban actually translate to 'this day' and 'this evening' on their own, so the particle just turns it into the greeting. Hope that helps slightly?
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    (Original post by Paramore<3)
    I think learning vocab/grammar is really important - but I would highly recommend mastering hiragana and katakana (and simple Kanji if you can bring yourself to it!) first, to stop yourself using romaji. It's up to you in what order you learn I suppose - I don't proclaim to know the key to linguistics - but I've found it helpful to learn grammar points, as then it is easier to incorporate vocab you can pick up quickly, as opposed to the other way around.

    For your second question, the 'wa' sound in konnichiwa/konbanwa actually acts as a particle - wa as a particle is always written as は, that's just how it is. The konnichi and konban actually translate to 'this day' and 'this evening' on their own, so the particle just turns it into the greeting. Hope that helps slightly?
    That's great, thanks so much!
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    (Original post by Dann)
    ありがとお ございます!
    Also, that is written as ありがとう with a 'u' at the end, not an o. Usually, long 'oh' vowels are written with an extra 'u' at the end, not an 'o'. (but there are some exceptions, like とおい (遠い) [far] so be careful ね!)
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    can only speak 1 word of japanese and its Taicho which i believe means captian :cookie:
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    (Original post by Dann)
    こんばんは!

    I was wondering if someone could help me out a bit. I'm just beginning to learn the language, and so following some advice I saw on here, I've been learning ひらがな and been doing ok with it. I guess next up I'll try to get to grips with かたかな (to put it in perspective just writing these words out is taking me an awful long time!). What I wanted to know was, when should I start trying to actually learn some vocab / grammar? Should I try and get the syllabaries down perfectly and then go, or should I be jumping in now?

    I have access to げんきbut it's sort of hard to know how to proceed. As another small question, in my book, こんばんは (as I wrote at the beginning) is transcribed as 'konbanwa'. Why is it not 'konbanha', or alternatively, こんばんわ?

    ありがとお ございます!
    I don't think you need to have mastered the kana to start learning vocab and grammar.

    As long as you know the kana, even if it takes you a second or two to remember it, you should be able to begin studying grammar and vocab - that is, if your lessons are in kana.

    If they are, then it'll give you some reading and writing practice, allowing you to perfect your kana while learning the basics of grammar and some vocab.

    Ultimately it's your choice though, I don't think in this particular case one is better than the other. As Paramore said, the primary objective is to avoid relying on romaji and get used to kana.
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    オッ~ス! ハハ, 僕の日本語はめっちゃ 悪いだ! ロシア人だから, ロシアの学校でロシア 語と英語とドイツ語を 学んだ. 僕は日本と日本の ミュジックを大好きな ので, この外国語 を自分自身で 学んだ.
    とにかく, それらのすべては やっぱりまずい. ハァァァ.
    A2lv.を終えた後, ドイツ語と日本語を勉 強したい!

    ok, that was hard. if anyone pointed out any mistakes I made here, it would be great
 
 
 
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